Confessions from the Principals Chair

Confessions from the Principals Chair

4.6 8
by Anna Myers
     
 

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In Denver, Robin (a.ka. Bird) is in with the cool clique. They wear the same clothes, talk the same way, and pick on the same girls. But when her Mom hears about a cruel prank against a less popular girl, she isnt going to tolerate the Queen Bee behavior. Within 24 hours, she pulls up stakes and moves them both to Prairie Dog, Oklahoma. Bird is positively furious, and…  See more details below

Overview

In Denver, Robin (a.ka. Bird) is in with the cool clique. They wear the same clothes, talk the same way, and pick on the same girls. But when her Mom hears about a cruel prank against a less popular girl, she isnt going to tolerate the Queen Bee behavior. Within 24 hours, she pulls up stakes and moves them both to Prairie Dog, Oklahoma. Bird is positively furious, and shes going get revenge on her hippy artist mother. In fact, revenge is the only thing keeping her going in the remote town. How shes going to get it, though, shes not sure yet.

When she goes to register at the local middle school, shes mistaken for the interim school principal. Who is Bird to correct the mistake when a prank like this will really get payback on her mom? Though she wont be able to pull this off forever, Birds determined to make her mark on the middle school before shes found out. But life in the principals chair is going to give her quite an unexpected change in perspective.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Janet L. Rose
Chicken fever: one chicken picks on another and draws blood; all the rest of the chickens gang up and pick on the hurt one. In a similar situation, at her previous school Robin was a member of the "six-pack," a clique that mercilessly picked on another student. Her mother, convinced the influence of the other girls was not healthy, pulled her from the school and moved to a small town in another state. Walking into her new school, Robin is mistaken for the temporary principal. In her new role she must deal with another picked-on student and the group of girls that instigate it. Trying to act like an adult, her thinking is still that of an eighth grader. For help she calls the Psychic Emergency Line, which actually does give her some good advice. Being 13-years-old Robin sides with the students, letting them have a water balloon fight, agreeing the cafeteria food is horrible, and allowing tank tops and shorts. She also helps the picked-on girl gain confidence and she convinces other students to side with her and not let the clique get the upper hand. The characters are caring, the story funny, and the bullying situation all too common. This is a great book for middle school students.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-This version of every kid's fantasy can be fun although it's sitcom thin and unbelievable, and its approach to bullying is unrealistic. After Robin and her group of eighth-grade friends, known as the Six Pack, are caught mistreating a classmate, Robin's mother moves them from Denver to Prairie Dog Town, OK. Dressed in a tailored suit chosen to bother her free-spirited mother, Robin goes to enroll in her new middle school and is mistaken for the substitute principal who (surprise!) has the same name. During her two days in office, she encounters a girl who is constantly tormented by a clique, gains insight into the victim's perspective, and works to empower her and address harassing behavior. She also watches soaps with the easygoing Coach Pickle, dials a psychic hotline for advice, and falls for a good-looking boy. By the time the real principal arrives, Robin has shared her story with the Opal television show and convinced them to come to town to do a special on bullying. Readers might enjoy this over-the-top book, but it's strictly additional when compared to James Howe's The Misfits (S & S, 2001), Doug Wilhelm's The Revealers (Farrar, 2003), and Judy Blume's Blubber (Random, 1976), all of which have fully developed characters, plausible plots, and lots more heart.-Tina Zubak, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In a distinct change of pace, Myers turns in a screwball comedy. In full adolescent-rebellion mode after her mom, Rendi, determinedly yanks her away from her classmate-harassing, dress-alike, eighth-grade clique and sets off in search of a fresh start, Robin dishes out the Silent Treatment, writes kidnap notes and makes a cold suggestion-which Rendi unexpectedly takes up-to settle down in Prairie Dog Town, Okla. There, she refuses to wear anything but business attire to her new school. When she is mistaken for the new temporary principal, Robin suddenly finds herself on the other side of the desk, saddled with a local clique and their harassment victim. With some help from a Psychic Hotline, Robin gets herself, the students and even Rendi straightened out during a reign that lasts but two days. Then she sells the whole episode as an anti-bullying human interest story to the national Opal Gentry TV show. Though some twists, such as Robin's pursuit of hunky student Kash Edge while still supposedly in charge, aren't all that funny, her chatty narrative and sometimes-misplaced self-confidence keep the tone light. (Fiction. 11-13)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802721457
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
07/15/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
File size:
813 KB
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt

Confessions from the Principal's Chair


By Myers, Anna

Walker Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2006 Myers, Anna
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0802795609

I was about to get stuck in some brand-new school. I rolled myself into a fetal position (I read that in a book), you know, like a baby in the womb. I remembered what it had been like when I started middle school, me not knowing anyone from before and walking down those halls all alone. In elementary school, the halls had been friendly, even in new schools, but I can tell you middle schools do not have friendly halls. In elementary, the halls are all decorated with frogs and rabbits and pictures of presidents and stuff. Not in middle school. Those halls are like prison halls, except I guess they don't have lockers in prisons. Anyway, I've never seen any lockers in prison movies, but I can tell you that the eyes that watch you in middle school halls are just as unfriendly as the eyes of all those murderers, rapists, and thieves. Those eyes (you know, at middle school) are as cold as the steel the lockers are made from. Wait a minute, I'm not sure that the lockers are made of steel. Maybe they are tin, but then, I guess you get the point about how cold the eyes were when I started middle school.


Continues...

Excerpted from Confessions from the Principal's Chairby Myers, Anna Copyright © 2006 by Myers, Anna. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Anna Myers is the author of more than one dozen books for Walker & Company, including Tulsa Burning, a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age, Flying Blind, an Oklahoma Book Award finalist, and Assassin, an Oklahoma Book Award winner. This is her first foray into contemporary humor. Anna lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with her husband John. Visit her Web site at www.annamyers.info.
Anna Myers is the author of more than one dozen books, including Tulsa Burning, a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age, Flying Blind, an Oklahoma Book Award finalist, and Assassin, an Oklahoma Book Award winner. Anna lives in Oklahoma.  annamyers.info

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