×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Confessions of a British Doctor (The Confessions Series)
     

Confessions of a British Doctor (The Confessions Series)

3.5 11
by Benjamin Daniels
 

See All Formats & Editions

THE UK’S BESTSELLING EBOOK OF 2011.Benjamin Daniels is angry. He is frustrated, confused, baffled and, quite frequently, very funny. He is also a GP. These are his confessions.A woman troubled by pornographic dreams about Tom Jones. An 80-year-old man who can't remember why he's come to see the doctor. A woman with a common cold demanding (but not receiving)

Overview

THE UK’S BESTSELLING EBOOK OF 2011.Benjamin Daniels is angry. He is frustrated, confused, baffled and, quite frequently, very funny. He is also a GP. These are his confessions.A woman troubled by pornographic dreams about Tom Jones. An 80-year-old man who can't remember why he's come to see the doctor. A woman with a common cold demanding (but not receiving) antibiotics. A man with a sore knee. A young woman who has been trying to conceive for a while but now finds herself pregnant and isn't sure she wants to go through with it. A 7-year-old boy with 'tummy aches' that don't really exist.These are his patients.Confessions of a GP is a witty insight into the life of a family doctor. Funny and moving in equal measure it will change the way you look at your GP next time you pop in with the sniffles.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780007512195
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/30/2013
Series:
The Confessions Series
Sold by:
HarperCollins Publishers
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
766,749
File size:
666 KB

Meet the Author

Benjamin Daniels is a GP. That is about as much as we can reveal about him.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Confessions of a GP 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
EBrightman More than 1 year ago
Visiting the doctor can be a nerve-wracking business and so, even without ever having had to have a consultation about a condition that would qualify me for Embarrassing Bodies, I tend to prefer to think of my GP as some sort of living embodiment of medical knowledge rather than a regular person who is baffled by my boils or is counting down the minutes until lunch break. With this in mind, I probably wasn’t the idea audience for a book which is very much about the human face of the medical profession and the way doctors perceive their patients. However, Confessions of a GP was recommended to me by a friend whose opinion I trust and so, at the risk of never being able to visit my own GP again, I decided to give it a go and, overall, I’m pleased that I did. Benjamin Daniels has a nice, clear writing style and, while I did disagree with some the of the points he made [from a non-medical point of view; I’m not convinced by his views on the diagnosis of certain psychological conditions], he came across as generally likeable and well-informed. Despite the book being called Confessions of a GP, much of the book is comprised of anecdotes and discussions about Daniels’ patients rather than secrets/revelations about his own work as a GP. With GPs getting to see their patients warts and all [as it were] it’s no surprise that Daniels has quite a few peculiar tales to recount – the woman with the Tom Jones fantasies etc – and so the book does feature plenty of laughs. Sometimes you get to laugh at the patients [which is perhaps not always the kindest thing to do] and sometimes at Daniels himself. Confessions of a GP isn’t a humour book though as, in common with every GP do doubt, Daniels’ career involves quite a bit of sadness. From the people with terminal conditions to the lonely elderly and from troubled kids to those unable to care for themselves, there are plenty of moving stories too. Although he is clearly ready to spin some tall tales and describe patients in an amusing manner, Daniels does come across as a generally caring and empathetic professional. Overall then, Confessions of a GP was a very enjoyable book. It is an extremely quick read and the short chapters sometimes felt rather disjointed. The various stories, trials and tribulations could perhaps have been better served by more “filler” passages that would have helped the book to hang together better as a whole. Still, a recommended short read for those wondering what it is like to be a GP and those who just wish to have a few laughs and learn a bit about the medical profession.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am not too impressed with this book. Perhaps, I am not impressed with the National Health Service since I live in the USA. This GP sounds only slightly better qualified than the average educated middle class patient. His job seems to be seeing 40 patients every day and to give them an aspirin and send them home quickly. His job is to meet time and money constraints for the government. Maybe only Brits should read this book. I would like a serious GP really write from serious point of view so that I could be educated in National Health Service since USA seems to be headed in that direction under Onamacare.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Dr Daniels" seems to be a very compassionate doctor. His book was full of very insightful remarks, not only about his patients, but also about why he went into medicine and why he stays in his chosen career path.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lala21559 More than 1 year ago
Very good book, shows you life on the other side of the examining table. Excellent book, well written, giving you the real flavor of being a doctor, from medical school onwards. Really gives you a feel for what the medical profession goes through, written with emotion, humor and compassion. Very enjoyable book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
a waste of money
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok a quick read. A bit boring.