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The Confessions of Saint Augustine
     

The Confessions of Saint Augustine

3.4 17
by Saint Augustine
 

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In his Confessions, Saint Augustine reflects upon his life in the light of scripture and the presence of God. He begins with his infancy, pondering the many sins of his life before his conversion, and he confesses not only his sins but even more the greatness of God. This work presents a wonderful contrast between the Holy God who created all things and whom heaven

Overview

In his Confessions, Saint Augustine reflects upon his life in the light of scripture and the presence of God. He begins with his infancy, pondering the many sins of his life before his conversion, and he confesses not only his sins but even more the greatness of God. This work presents a wonderful contrast between the Holy God who created all things and whom heaven and earth cannot contain, and a commonly sinful man who has joyfully received God's loving salvation and mercy.

Many scholars consider Saint Augustine to be among the greatest and most influential fathers of the early church. And as you read his Confessions, you will find the confident humility that is common among those whom Jesus calls "great in the kingdom of heaven." Augustine writes as a common man, and so his words span time and tradition. May his Confessions guide you to the One whom he confesses.

This edition features an artistic cover, a new promotional introduction, and a hierarchical table of contents which makes it possible to navigate to any part of the book with a minimum of page turns.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013195684
Publisher:
Christian Classics Ethereal Library
Publication date:
08/03/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Accepted by most scholars to be the most important figure in the ancient Western church, St. Augustine was born in Tagaste, Numidia in North Africa. His mother was a Christian, but his father remained a pagan until late in life. After a rather unremarkable childhood, marred only by a case of stealing pears, Augustine drifted through several philosophical systems before converting to Christianity at the age of thirty-one. At the age of nineteen, Augustine read Cicero's Hortensius, an experience that led him into the fascination with philosophical questions and methods that would remain with him throughout his life. After a few years as a Manichean, he became attracted to the more skeptical positions of the Academic philosophers. Although tempted in the direction of Christianity upon his arrival at Milan in 383, he turned first to neoplatonism, During this time, Augustine fathered a child by a mistress. This period of exploration, including its youthful excesses (perhaps somewhat exaggerated) are recorded in Augustine's most widely read work, the Confessions.

During his youth, Augustine had studied rhetoric at Carthage, a discipline that he used to gain employment teaching in Carthage and then in Rome and Milan, where he met Ambrose who is credited with effecting Augustine's conversion and who baptized Augustine in 387. Returning to his homeland soon after his conversion, he was ordained a presbyter in 391, taking the position as bishop of Hippo in 396, a position which he held until his death.

Besides the Confessions, Augustine's most celebrated work is his De Civitate Dei (On the City of God), a study of the relationship between Christianity and secular society, which was inspired by the fall of Rome to the Visigoths in 410. Among his other works, many are polemical attacks on various heresies: Against Faustus, the Manichean; On Baptism; Against the Donatists; and many attacks on Pelagianism and Semi-Pelagianism. Other works include treatises On the Trinity; On Faith, Hope, and Love; On Christian Doctrine; and some early dialogues.

St. Augustine stands as a powerful advocate for orthodoxy and of the episcopacy as the sole means for the dispensing of saving grace. In the light of later scholarship, Augustine can be seen to serve as a bridge between the ancient and medieval worlds. A review of his life and work, however, shows him as an active mind engaging the practical concerns of the churches he served.

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The Confessions of Saint Augustine 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
regirene More than 1 year ago
As a fan of St. Augustine I purchased this nook book without first checking it out. The "wherewiths, withers, thees, thou, knoweths" and adding -est to SO many words makes it tiresome reading. Then throw in some "whences" & "thences". If you can get through all of that, more power to you. I've read translations that use more contemporary wording and suggest to future readers of Augustine to compare before committing to any book. St. Augustine's spirituality is as powerful as ever, just difficult to read in this format.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Your sample of this book does not provide even one page of Ryan's translation - which would be the only reason I would be interested in the book. I am NOT interested in the prelude and etc.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was written so long ago, yet it could have been written this year. The style and thought are very current, very insightful. Augustine writes so eloquently. His struggles can easily be our struggles, and his style is so forceful, yet poetic. Strongly recommend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It would be most useful to see some of the English translation in the free sample of the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mess you may find. Religious confessions like born again usually are best from a gladiator where you are liable to be swatted one if disrespectful duribg the sermon
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was NOT Maria Boulding's translation. The cover shows her book and even mentioned her name, my husband has a hard copy, so I was able to compare with his and thought I was downloading the same version. This translation is much harder to read and understand. Wish I would have bought the real book instead of this download.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is what much of the Catholic dogma is based on!
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