The Confessions of St. Augustine [NOOK Book]

Overview


"Augustine never thought of God without thinking of his sin, nor of his sin without thinking of Christ."

St. Augustine grates hard against "the anatomy of evil" while dealing succinctly and honestly with his own proneness toward sin. From his infatuation with its initial beauty to the discounting of his previously wasted life, Augustine leaves little to the imagination regarding his need to be saved from himself.

Most of Augustine's ...

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The Confessions of St. Augustine

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Overview


"Augustine never thought of God without thinking of his sin, nor of his sin without thinking of Christ."

St. Augustine grates hard against "the anatomy of evil" while dealing succinctly and honestly with his own proneness toward sin. From his infatuation with its initial beauty to the discounting of his previously wasted life, Augustine leaves little to the imagination regarding his need to be saved from himself.

Most of Augustine's Confessions are spent in a nearly catastrophe tug of war. From insult and injury to passion, lost love, and the arts--this work leads through and beyond a world where God's timing is absolutely perfect. Nothing has really changed since then. Sin is still sin--and God is still
God.

Moody Classics
Of all the factors influencing our spiritual growth and development, pivotal books play a key role. Learning from those who have walked the path and fought the fight brings wisdom and strengthens resolve. And hearing the familiar chords of kingdom living sung by voices from other times can penetrate cultural barriers that limit our allegiance to the King. To this end, Moody Publishers is honored to introduce the first six volumes in what is to be an ongoing series of spiritual classics. Selected for their enduring influence and timeless perspective,
these new editions promise to shape the lives of spiritual pilgrims for generations to come.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802480675
  • Publisher: Moody Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Series: Moody Classics
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 865,581
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO (354-430) was one of the foremost philosopher-theologians of early Christianity and the leading figure in the church of North Africa. He became bishop of Hippo in 396 and held that position until his death. Before becoming a Christian, Augustine lived a very secular life. His mother Monica prayed for him diligently and at age 32, during a trip to Milan, Augustine heard the preaching of St. Ambrose, was convicted by the Holy Spirit, and became a Christian. His numerous written works, the most important of which are his Confessions and City of God, shaped the practice of biblical exegesis and helped lay the foundation for much of medieval and modern Christian thought.
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Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION / 9

THE FIRST BOOK / 19
Confessions of the greatness and unsearchableness of
God-Of God's mercies in infancy and boyhood, and
human willfulness-Of his own sins of idleness, abuse
of his studies,
and of God's gifts up to his fifteenth year.

THE SECOND BOOK / 44
Object of these confessions-Further ills of idleness
developed in his sixteenth year-Evils of ill society,
which betrayed him into theft.

THE THIRD BOOK / 58
His residence at Carthage from his seventeenth to his
nineteenth year-Source of his disorders-Love of
shows-Advance in studies, and love of wisdom-
Distaste for
Scripture-Led astray to the Manichaeans-
Refutation of some of their tenets-Grief of his mother,
Monnica, at his heresy, and prayers for his conversion-
Her vision from God, and answer through a Bishop.

THE FOURTH BOOK / 78
Augustine's life from nineteen to twenty-eight-
Himself a Manichaean, and seducing others to the same
heresy-Partial obedience amidst vanity and sin, consulting
astrologers,
only partially shaken herein-Loss
of an early friend, who is converted by being baptized
when in a swoon-Reflections on grief, on real and unreal
friendship,
and love of fame-Writes on "the fair
and fit," yet cannot rightly, though God had given him
great talents, since he entertained wrong notions of God;
and so even his knowledge he applied ill.

THE FIFTH BOOK / 102
Augustine's twenty-ninth year-Faustus, a snare of
Satan to man, made an instrument of deliverance to St.
Augustine, by showing the ignorance of the Manichees
on those things wherein they professed to have divine
knowledge-Augustine gives up all thought of going further
among the Manichees-Is guided to Rome and
Milan, where he hears St. Ambrose-Leaves the
Manichees, and becomes again a Catechumen in the
Catholic
Church.

THE SIXTH BOOK / 126
Arrival of Monnica at Milan-her obedience to St.
Ambrose, and his value for her-St. Ambrose's habits-
Augustine's gradual abandonment of error-Finds that
he has blamed the Catholic Church wrongly-Desire of
absolute certainty, but struck with the contrary analogy
of God's natural
Providence-How shaken in his worldly
pursuits-God's guidance of his friend Alypius-
Augustine debates with himself and his friends about
their mode of life-His inveterate sins, and dread of
judgment.

THE SEVENTH BOOK / 153
Augustine's thirty-first year-Gradually extricated from
his errors, but still with material conceptions of God-
Much aided by an argument of Nebridius-Sees that the
cause of sin lies in free-will, rejects the Manichaean
heresy, but cannot altogether embrace the doctrine of
the Church-Recovered from the belief in Astrology, but
miserably perplexed about the origin of evil-Is led to
find in the Platonists the seeds of the doctrine of the
Divinity of the Word, but not of His humiliation-
Hence he obtains clearer notions of God's majesty, but,
not knowing Christ to be the
Mediator, remains
estranged from Him-All his doubts removed by the
study of
Holy Scripture, especially St. Paul.

THE EIGHTH BOOK / 183
Augustine's thirty-second year-He consults
Simplicianus, from him hears the history of the conversion
of Victorinus, and longs to devote himself entirely
to God, but is mastered by his old habits-Is still further
roused by the history of St. Anthony,
and the conversion
of two courtiers-During a severe struggle, hears a voice
from heaven, opens Scripture, and is converted, with his
friend Alypius-His mother's vision fulfilled.

THE NINTH BOOK / 212
Augustine determines to devote his life to God, and to
abandon his profession of Rhetoric, quietly, however-
Retires to the country to prepare himself to receive the
grace of Baptism, and is baptized with Alypius, and his
son Adeodatus-At Ostia, on his way to Africa, his
mother,
Monnica, dies, in her fifty-sixth year, the thirtythird
of Augustine-Her life and character.

THE TENTH BOOK / 243
Having in the former books spoken of himself before his
receiving the grace of Baptism, in this Augustine confesses
what he then was-He inquires by what faculty
we can know God at all, when he enlarges on the mysterious
character of the memory, wherein God, being
made known,
dwells, but which could not discover Him
-Examines his own trials under the triple division of
temptation, "lust of the flesh, lust of the eyes, and
pride,"-what
Christian continency prescribes as to
each-On Christ the Only Mediator, who heals and will
heal all infirmities.

NOTES / 299

TO THINK ABOUT / 304

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 61 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    Bad Scan

    Bad Scan

    Like so many of the free books available for the Nook, this is a Google scan & book is very poor. Pagination and printing is off. This is not the way to read a book.

    It is not worth the trouble, and I am deleting it.

    I guess you really do get what you pay for¿

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Life Changing

    I first came across St. Augustine's "Confessions" when I was a freshman in college. It was a monumental experience in terms of both the content of his writing and the freshness and relevance of his writing style. After re-reading them again recently, I am still struck with how contemporary the book feels. Aside from many of its 4th century particularities, the concerns that St. Augustine had and the way he frankly and honestly dealt with them could be lifted from almost any contemporary tell-all autobiography. The biggest exception is the fact that "Confessions" is a quintessentially and irreducibly a religious text, and in an age when religious considerations are largely pushed towards the margins of their life stories, it is refreshing and uplifting to see what would a life look like for someone who took them very seriously and committed himself to reorganizing one's whole life around the idea of serving God wholly and uncompromisingly. "Confessions" is a very accessible text, and for the most part it does not deal with theological and philosophical issues. The exception is the latter part of the book, which are almost exclusively dedicated to those topics. You may want to skip those at the first reading, but I would encourage you to read them nevertheless. Maybe the very inspiring and uplifting story of St. Augustine's conversion to Christianity can lead you into deeper considerations about your faith or the meaning of life in general. I cannot think of a better introduction to those topics than "Confessions," nor of a better guide than St. Augustine.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 12, 2012

    Recommended

    Take TIME to read this spiritually helpful book. A page or two a day is easier to comprehend and apply to our life. This book is a four star rate in my opinion.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Great book - bad scan

    This book is an amazing read, but it is really hard to read this ebook because of all the errors.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2010

    Different book than is shown on page.

    The book that you receive when you download this title is an archaic version of the Confessions and is missing the last three chapters. I called Customer Service and they were very helpful. They were very courteous and refunded my purchase.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Confessions of St Augustine (Large Print)

    What a great book that is now available in large print for those of us who need a bit larger print than the fine print usually reserved for legal documents! ha!
    St Augustine draws us in to his world and his travels as he walks the road towards the City of God. His reflections offer so much hope and inspiration in a world so desperately in need of affirming voices.
    In BX 9 the death of his Mother Monica is a beautiful tribute to her faith and her charity among the godly. This is a book that will never be out of style or grow stale. We are all faced with the same challenges as we walk our won pilgrim way. It is definetealy a companion for the journey. It's a great read in your early years and a must in your later years.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2012

    Highly recommended - you mut check it out

    I attend bible class and need to be aquainted with the Confessions of St. Augustine. The History of Early Church is quite interesting and informative.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Another great book I read in college!

    Great read another great book for your reading collection!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2013

    Highly recomended! Really, check it out

    I like reading this in bits. It's easy to read but more importantly the message needs to be digested and internalized. It's such an insightful look at how we all realy are.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    An old translation? too old??

    This probably does give a flavor of the manner of reasoning of St. Augustine, a saint who lived when people evidently had a lot more time for navel-gazing. The language is archaic and the reasoning obtuse. I would have preferred a more "helpful" - dumbed down? - translation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted January 22, 2010

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