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Conflict of Interest
     

Conflict of Interest

4.5 2
by Lauryn Christopher
 
It’s a bad idea to piss off a professional assassin, and Meg Harrison -- corporate spy and sometimes assassin -- is definitely pissed off. Not only has a new, and very irritating client hired her to kill her own sister, but to top it all off, Meg didn't even know she *had* a sister. For Meg, this is a contract that hits a little too close to home.

Overview

It’s a bad idea to piss off a professional assassin, and Meg Harrison -- corporate spy and sometimes assassin -- is definitely pissed off. Not only has a new, and very irritating client hired her to kill her own sister, but to top it all off, Meg didn't even know she *had* a sister. For Meg, this is a contract that hits a little too close to home.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012714169
Publisher:
Camden Park Press
Publication date:
12/04/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
465 KB

Meet the Author

Lauryn Christopher writes crime and mystery stories, often from the bad-guy's point of view. You can find more of her work at Camden Park Press (www.camdenparkpress.com)

Customer Reviews

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Conflict of Interest 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
BigAl70 More than 1 year ago
Corporate spies, assassins and hit-men (or women) are such staples of certain fictional genres that readers are accustomed to the premise and suspension of disbelief is easy, regardless of how prevalent we believe they are (or aren't) in the real world. Once we buy into the initial premise, the stories fall into a few basic formulas. How well the author executes the formula while making it feel unique is what sets one book apart from the others and determines the best reads. "Conflict of Interest" has a couple things that made the story unique. First is the protagonist, Meg Harrison. The stereotypical hit-person is a lone-wolf man. He'll be amoral (almost a requirement for the job), or a psychopath as well as cold and unemotional. He'll often live off-the-grid or, if not, have a cover completely separate from his life as a assassin, with frequent "business trips" as an explanation for his disappearances to perform his contract killings. Meg's situation couldn't be more different from the stereotype. Not only are there the obvious differences we'd expect because of gender, but her approach itself is much different. She operates as a business, with legitimate (although not totally unrelated) legal activities filling the time between her more clandestine jobs. This has many advantages with easy laundering of the money from her illegal activities one of the biggest. Although largely unemotional about what she does, we find Meg doesn't fit the norm, as she discovers the identity of her latest victim-to-be. As a reader we're setup to want Meg's assignment to be successful, with the story conflict turning out to be just how she should define success this time around. With "Conflict of Interest,: Christopher turns the hit-man formula on its head, and in doing so gives us a surprising and entertaining read. **Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **
Anonymous More than 1 year ago