Confucianism and Human Rights / Edition 1

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Overview

Is the Confucian tradition compatible with the Western understanding of human rights? Are there fundamental human values, regardless of cultural differences, common to all peoples of all nations? At this critical point in Communist China's history, eighteen distinguished scholars address the role of Confucianism in dealing with questions of universal human rights.

Columbia University Press

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Editorial Reviews

International Studies in Philosophy - Dale Maurice Riepe

This engaging book is propaedeutic to a study of how Confucianism might contribute to decisions respecting rights.

Choice

The essays explore such vital subjects as the normative foundation of human rights claims, the relationship of the individual to the nation-state, rites as rights, due process, harmony versus freedom of thought, constitutionalism, and the rule of law.... each one does stand on its own as a solid piece of scholarship.

International Studies in Philosophy
This engaging book is propaedeutic to a study of how Confucianism might contribute to decisions respecting rights.

— Dale Maurice Riepe

Asian Affairs - Stefan B. Polter

An ambitious book, dealing with human nature, according to classical Confucian philosophers, analogies between rights and rites, and Confucian influences in 20th-century China.

Asian Thought and Society - Edward Friedman

This rich volume, a feast for the mind, a joy to the soul, is so wise in seeing that the human rights discourse is not the singular fruit of a peculiar liberal individualistic Western tradition, not the unique genetic child of Jews or Christians or Greeks.

China Quarterly - Lynn Struve

It reduces the lack of clarity that has characterized discussions of this subject to date.

Asian Affairs
An ambitious book, dealing with human nature, according to classical Confucian philosophers, analogies between rights and rites, and Confucian influences in 20th-century China.

— Stefan B. Polter

Asian Thought and Society
This rich volume, a feast for the mind, a joy to the soul, is so wise in seeing that the human rights discourse is not the singular fruit of a peculiar liberal individualistic Western tradition, not the unique genetic child of Jews or Christians or Greeks.

— Edward Friedman

China Quarterly
It reduces the lack of clarity that has characterized discussions of this subject to date.

— Lynn Struve

Choice

The essays explore such vital subjects as the normative foundation of human rights claims, the relationship of the individual to the nation-state, rites as rights, due process, harmony versus freedom of thought, constitutionalism, and the rule of law.... each one does stand on its own as a solid piece of scholarship.

Edward Friedman
This rich volume, a feast for the mind, a joy to the soul, is so wise in seeing that the human rights discourse is not the singular fruit of a peculiar lieberal individualistic Western tradition, not the unique genetic child of Jews or Christians or Greeks.
Charles Horner
A serious, energetic, and deeply informed discussion.
Lynn Struve
It reduces the lack of clarity that has characterized discussions of this subject to date.
Choice
The essays explore such vital subjects as the normative foundation of human rights claims, the relationship of the individual to the nation-state, rites as rights, due process, harmony versus freedom of thought, constitutionalism, and the rule of law. . . . each one does stand on its own as a solid piece of scholarship.
Times Literary Supplement
A significant and laudable collection, not only because of the timeliness of the subject but also for its numerous useful suggestions on how to discuss human rights in terms of traditional East Asian discourse.
Stefan B. Polter
Confucianism and Human Rights is an ambitious book, dealing with human nature, according to classical Confucian philosophers, analogies between rights and rites, and Confucian influences in 20th-century China.
Booknews
Taking as their point of departure the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, eighteen specialists<-->lead by De Bary (founding director, Columbia U. Center for the Study of Human Rights) and Weiming (Chinese history and philosophy, Harvard U.)<-->present a range of viewpoints on whether and how ancient Confucian norms may be reconciled with Western ideals of human rights, contemporary Chinese ideology, and cultural relativism. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231109376
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 4/29/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Wm. Theodore de Bary is the author or editor of more than two dozen works on Asian civilizations, including Sources of Chinese Tradition and Sources of Japanese Tradition.Tu Weiming is the editor of China in Transformation and author of Living Tree: The Changing Meaning of Being Chinese Today, and Way, Meaning and Politics: Essays on the Confucian Intellectual.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

1. The Chinese Tradition in Antiquity1. The Oracle-Bone Inscriptions of the Late Shang DynastyDavid N. Keightley2. Classical Sources of Chinese Tradition Burton Watson, by David S. Nivison, Irene Bloom3. Confucius and the AnalectsIrene Bloom4. Mozi: Utilitarianism, Uniformity, and Universal Love, by Burton Watson5. The Way of Laozi and Zhuangzi6. The Evolution of the Confucian Tradition in Antiquity7. Legalists and Militarists8. The Han Reaction to Qin Despotism9. Daoist Syncretisms of the Late Zhou, by Qin, and Early Han10. The Imperial Order and Han Syntheses11. The Economic Order Burton Watson, by Wm. Theodore deBary12. The Great Han Historians Burton Watson3. Later Taoism and Mah?y?na Buddhism in China13. Learning of the MysteriousRichard John Lynn, by Wing-tsit Chan, Irene Bloom14. Daoist ReligionFranciscus Verellen, by Nathan Sivin, et al.15. The Introduction of Buddhism16. Schools of Buddhism17. Schools of Buddhism4. The Confucian Revival and Neo-Confucianism18. Social Life and Political Culture in the Tang19. The Confucian Revival in the Song20. Neo-Confucianism: The Philosophy of Human Nature and the Way of the Sage21. Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucian Program Wm. Theodore deBary22. Ideological Foundations of Late Imperial China23. Neo-Confucian Education24. Continuity and Crisis in the Ming

Columbia University Press

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