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Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson
     

Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson

by Paul Finkelman (Editor), Donald R. Kennon (Editor)
 

In 1815 the United States was a proud and confident nation. Its second war with England had come to a successful conclusion, and Americans seemed united as never before. The collapse of the Federalists left the Jeffersonian Republicans in control of virtually all important governmental offices. This period of harmony—what historians once called the Era of

Overview


In 1815 the United States was a proud and confident nation. Its second war with England had come to a successful conclusion, and Americans seemed united as never before. The collapse of the Federalists left the Jeffersonian Republicans in control of virtually all important governmental offices. This period of harmony—what historians once called the Era of Good Feeling—was not illusory, but it was far from stable. One-party government could not persist for long in a vibrant democracy full of ambitious politicians, and sectional harmony was possible only as long as no one addressed the hard issues: slavery, race, western expansion, and economic development.

Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson inaugurates a new series for the United States Capitol Historical Society, one that will focus on issues that led to the secession crisis and the Civil War. This first volume examines controversies surrounding sectionalism and the rise of Jacksonian Democracy, placing these sources of conflict in the context of congressional action in the 1820s and 1830s. The essays in this volume consider the plight of American Indians, sectional strife over banking and commerce, emerging issues involving slavery, and the very nature of American democracy.

Contributors:
Michael Les Benedict
Daniel Feller
Robert P. Forbes
William W. Freehling
Tim Alan Garrison
Jan Lewis
Peter S. Onuf
Jenny B. Wahl

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The essays are interesting, sophisticated, and nuanced explorations that have new things to say and new ways of thinking about the topics they discuss.… In many of these pieces the authors flesh out our understanding, in others they challenge the usual understanding.”
The Journal of American History

“Whether readers ultimately judge Jackson great or flawed, they will certainly benefit from the insights of the historians in this book.”
The Historian

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780821417836
Publisher:
Ohio University Press
Publication date:
05/28/2008
Series:
Perspective History of Congres Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author


Paul Finkelman is President William McKinley Distinguished Professor of Law and Public Policy at Albany Law School and Senior Fellow in the Government Law Center. He is the author of many articles and books, including His Soul Goes Marching On: Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid and the Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference.

Donald R. Kennon is the chief historian of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. He is the general editor of the society’s publication program with Ohio University Press, which includes this series and Perspectives on the Art and Architectural History of the United States Capitol.

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