Connectivity in Antiquity: Globalization as a Long-Term Historical Process

Overview

Today's political minds assure us that the more connected societies are the less danger they pose to global stability-but is this a new idea or one that is as old as history itself? Trade networks that began as far back as human prehistory were responsible for exchanges of ideas as well as goods and the ripple effects of these networks were the expansionist compulsions of historical States and empires. These papers tell us that the civilizations of the ancient past may have had more in common with modern global ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $99.69   
  • New (4) from $99.69   
  • Used (1) from $102.80   
Sending request ...

Overview

Today's political minds assure us that the more connected societies are the less danger they pose to global stability-but is this a new idea or one that is as old as history itself? Trade networks that began as far back as human prehistory were responsible for exchanges of ideas as well as goods and the ripple effects of these networks were the expansionist compulsions of historical States and empires. These papers tell us that the civilizations of the ancient past may have had more in common with modern global enterprises than was ever before imagined. Two concepts that have great immediacy and have now become the current watchwords for the media as well as for academia, globalization and long-term historical processes, are brought together in this interdisciplinary volume of papers based upon Manuel Castells' massive work The Network Society. Oystein S. LaBianca is Professor of Anthropology and Senior Director, International Development Program, at Andrews University, Michigan. Sandra Arnold Scham is Lecturer and Research Development Specialist, Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland and Coordinator, Negev Bedouin Identity Project, Howard University.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Oystein S. LaBianca is Professor of Anthropology and Senior Director, International Development Program, at Andrews University, Michigan. Sandra Arnold Scham is an archaeologist, the current Washington Correspondent for Archaeology Magazine and the former editor of the journal Near Eastern Archaeology. In addition to teaching the archaeology of the Ancient Near East at the University of Maryland and Catholic University she has also taught at Jerusalem University College in Israel. Sandra has done archaeological work in Israel, Jordan and Southeastern Turkey. For four years between 2001 and 2005, she was the co-director of an Israeli and Palestinian cooperative heritage project funded by the U.S. Department of State-the first such project ever undertaken. From 2008 to 2010 she has been serving as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow in which capacity she is advising the United States Agency for International Development on development strategies in the Middle East and Asia.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Ancient Network Societies? (Oystein LaBianca and Sandra Arnold Scham)

Section One: The Space of Flows in Antiquity:
1. Grand Narratives, Technological Revolutions and the Past: Deep-Time Studies of Metallurgy and Social Evolution in the Eastern Mediterranean (Thomas E. Levy, UCSD)

2. Emerging State Connectivity: Dynamic Urban and Economic Growth in Third Millennium BCE West Syrian Societies (William Collins, UC Berkeley)

3. Trade Pulsations, Collapse and Reorientation in the Ancient World (William R. Thompson, Indiana University)

Section Two: Cognitive Globalization in History:
4. The Globalizing Effects of Hajj in the Medieval and Modern Eras (Bethany J. Walker, Oklahoma State University)

5. Connectivity: Transjordan during the Persian Period (Paul J. Ray, Jr., Andrews University)

6. The Organic Globalization and Socialization of Civilization (Sheldon Lee Gosline, Sangri-La Press)

Section Three: Antiquity and the Power of Identity:
7. Connectivity in the Longue Duree: Hadramis from South Yemen in an Indian Ocean World (Leif Manger, University of Bergen)

8. Perceptions of Antiquity and the Formation of Modern Resistance Identities (Sandra Arnold Scham)

9. Foreign Self and Familiar Other: The Impact of Global Connectivity on New Kingdom Egypt (Jenny Cashman, Oxford University)

10. Comments and Conclusions (Manuel Castells, UC Berkeley)

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)