The Conquest of New Spain

The Conquest of New Spain

4.9 7
by Bernal Diaz Del Castillo
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Vivid, powerful and absorbing, this is a first-person account of one of the most startling military episodes in history: the overthrow of Montezuma's doomed Aztec Empire by the ruthless Hernan Cortes and his band of adventurers. Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing

Overview

Vivid, powerful and absorbing, this is a first-person account of one of the most startling military episodes in history: the overthrow of Montezuma's doomed Aztec Empire by the ruthless Hernan Cortes and his band of adventurers. Bernal Díaz del Castillo, himself a soldier under Cortes, presents a fascinatingly detailed description of the Spanish landing in Mexico in 1520 and their amazement at the city, the exploitation of the natives for gold and other treasures, the expulsion and flight of the Spaniards, their regrouping and eventual capture of the Aztec capital.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140441239
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/1963
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
330,583
Product dimensions:
5.07(w) x 7.78(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Spanish historian Bernal Diaz del Castillo (c.1492-1584) was a soldier in the army of the conquistador Cortes in the attack on the Aztecs.

J M Cohen translated widely from French and Spanish, including for Penguin Classics Montaigne's Essays and Cervantes' Don Quixote.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Conquest of New Spain 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
castiliansaint More than 1 year ago
At first I was debating on whether or not to get this book.Boy am I glad i did.Diaz writes in a manner that will keep you glued to the pages.This book speaks to me as part of my history.My father was Mexican American and my mother is of Andalucian decent so this book is pure gold about the two cultures. For sure will I read this adventurous book to my kids when then are a little older.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BruceStores More than 1 year ago
Of all of the writers of history, none may be as accurate in their accounts as are actual witnesses to the events being chronicled. Yet at the same time, we're all aware that honest witnesses to crimes and accidents often give contradicting testimony to what they believe they have seen. But it is for more than this that should give us caution when reading this book. Bernal Díaz didn't begin to write the memoirs of his experiences as a conquistador until about 35 years following those events. How many senior citizens reading this can remember so much detail from their experiences 35 years ago? How well could Bernal accurately quote from the mouth of Cortés, Montezuma and many others? Every reader must wonder to what extent three and a half decades might have affected the accuracy of Diaz's writing. But even with the above in mind, The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico has the privilege of being written by an actual witness of events as they happened. Whether it was the slick-talking Hernan Cortes smoothing over his artful cheating of his own men for personal gain, the emotions felt when entering the Aztec city Tenochtitlan, describing the treasures of the new world, witnessing human sacrifices, his many voyages, or the bloody description of fierce combat, Díaz was there, writing from his own experience. It is likely that there is hardly a book as rich in description with such relevance to the history of the Americas as is this narrative by one of Hernan Cortes's foot soldiers. Bruce Stores has lived in Mexico since 1995, currently residing in the city of Oaxaca. He is author of the historical fiction book, "THE ISTHMUS: Stories from Mexico's Past, 1495 to 1995", iUniverse, 2009
LoveTheSpurs More than 1 year ago
I was assigned this book in college several years ago and was completely engrossed from the beginning. This is a fabulous book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My father read this book 30 years ago and always spoke of it. After searching on-line, I gave it to him for Fathers Day 'he was so delighted it still existed!!'. I had to read it first, then my husband... Reading history books is different than reading personal accounts! Bernal Diaz spoke plainly, descriptively and with such clarity of memory that we laughed, cried, was completely repulsed right along with him. Not great for young teens or younger because of graphic discriptions of certain religious rites & extremes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of Mexico. Written from a first hand account, a hapless Spaniard records historic events in Mexico from first hand experience. Written with the intensity and imagination of a movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book 28 years ago when I was living for a few months in Mexico. That area came alive for me. I will never forget it! I now live in New Mexico and am studying the history of that state. I'm impressed with what a good foundation this book gave me to my current studies. Its a wonderful read!