Conservation Agriculture: Environment, Farmers Experiences, Innovations, Socio-Economy, Policy

Overview

In large parts of the developed and developing worlds soil tillage by plough or hoe is the main cause of land degradation leading to stagnating or even declining production levels and increasing production cost. It causes the soil to become more dense and compacted, the organic matter content to be reduced and water runoff and soil erosion to increase. It also leads to droughts becoming more severe and the soil becoming less fertile and less responsive to fertiliser. There is a growing number of experiences in ...

See more details below
Paperback (Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2003)
$270.16
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$319.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $234.63   
  • New (6) from $234.63   
  • Used (1) from $326.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

In large parts of the developed and developing worlds soil tillage by plough or hoe is the main cause of land degradation leading to stagnating or even declining production levels and increasing production cost. It causes the soil to become more dense and compacted, the organic matter content to be reduced and water runoff and soil erosion to increase. It also leads to droughts becoming more severe and the soil becoming less fertile and less responsive to fertiliser. There is a growing number of experiences in conditions of both mechanised and un-mechanised agriculture, on small and large farms in both temperate and tropical zones that further and significant improvements in conservation-effective agriculture are indeed possible, and acceptable to farmers, in addressing these varied concerns now strongly indicate that sustainable production systems can be achieved when the basic principles of good farming practice are applied. The terminology being adopted for such systems by FAO, ECAF and other organisations is "Conservation Agriculture". This implies conformity with all three of the following general principles: no mechanical soil disturbance, direct seeding or planting; and permanent soil cover, making particular use of crop residues and cover crops; judicious choice of crop rotations. This book brings together the key notes lectures and other outstanding contributions of the I World Congress on Conservation Agriculture and provides an updated view of the environment and economic advantages of CA and of its implementation in diferent areas of the World.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789048162116
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 12/9/2010
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2003
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 516
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.08 (d)

Table of Contents

I. Conservation agriculture global improvements.- Conservation agriculture: global environmental benefits of soil carbon management.- Factors affecting the uptake of no-tillage in Australia, Asia and New Zealand..- Conservation agriculture and the rural women. Breaking barriers for a new horizon.- Agriculture and natural resource management. The role of conservation agriculture.- II. Farmer experiences with conservation agriculture.- No till, the stubble and the soil nutrition.- Argentine agriculture: an innovative experience.- The soil, agriculture and I.- Farmers’ and experts’ opinion on no-tillage in Western Europe and Nebraska (USA).- Experiences with farmer clubs in dissemination of zero tillage in Tropical Brazil.- III. International networks for conservation agriculture.- Conservation agriculture in Europe: current status and perspectives.- Direct seeding on plant cover: sustainable cultivation of our planet’s soils.- Survival farming.- Latin American conservation agriculture network — RELACO.- The african conservation tillage network enhancing conservation tillage in Africa.- Need for establishment of South Asian conservation agriculture network.- A strategy for soil conservation farming in Northern Kazakhstan.- FAO’s Role in promoting conservation agriculture.- Western Australian no-tillage farmers association.- A world of conservation agriculture.- ICARDA’s network on conservation agriculture in Central Asia.- Conservation agriculture for the rice-wheat systems of the indogangetic plains of South Asia: A case study from India.- Zero tillage in Switzerland: the bernese incentive program.- IV. Recent innovations on conservation agriculture.- Conservation tillage, no-tillage and related technologies.- Cover crop management.- Weeds and conservation agriculture.- Non-inversion tillage in integrated farming concepts: prospects and constraints of cropping systems in the southwest of Germany.- Conflicts between conservation agriculture and livesk over the utilisation of crop residues.- “Improved cereal production technology” FAO project on conservation agriculture in Mongolia.- Development of an animal drawn zero tillage seeder for small grains.- No-till management intensity zones for Pennsylvania.- V. Adaptation of the agricultural industry to conservation agriculture.- Farm machines for large-scale conservation agriculture.- No-tillage equipment for small farms in Brazil.- Integrated pest management for conservation agriculture.- Perspectives of precision agriculture in conservation agriculture.- VI. Influence of conservation agriculture on environment.- Tillage-induced CO2 emissions and carbon sequestration: effect of secondary tillage and compaction.- Long-term effects of agricultural practices on microbial community.- Tillage and soil compaction.- Soil moisture conservation.- No-tillage visions — protection of soil, water and climate and influence on management and farm income.- Environmental impacts of zero tillage in Brazil — a first approximation.- Watershed conservation farming “a friendly solution to soils degradation”.- Carbon dioxide fluxes from arable soils as affected by temperature and moisture.- The role of draft animal power in soil and water conservation.- The use of powerful machines in different soil tillage systems.- A rapid, immediate, farmer-usable method of assessing soil structure condition to support conservation agriculture.- Soil conservation options for olive orchards on sloping land.- Development of the biological activity in different tillage systems.- Adaptation of sowing techniques to maintain important lumbricid biomasses in the hydromorphic soils of Normandy.- Soil management systems to support soil microbial biomass in vineyards.- Conservation agriculture as a tool to reduce emission of greenhouse gasses. A case from southern Brazil.- Agrochemical leaching and water contamination.- VII. Socio-economic perspectives and policy implications for development.- Economic globalisation and conservation agriculture: the case of Mercosur.- Strategies for international cooperation.- Investing in conservation agriculture.- Win-win options for food security: conservation agriculture soil fertility, soil biodiversity and carbon sequestration nexus.- Conservation farming among small-holder farmers in E. Africa: adapting and adopting innovative land management options.- Land use planning: a key to sustainable agriculture.- The development and transfer of a new no-tillage technology.- Conservation tillage options for the poor, small landholders in South Asia.- An innovative approach to develop conservation agriculture programs and funding.- Adoption of no-till by small farmers: understanding the generation of complex technologies.- Developing soil protection in the EU.- Author Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)