Conservation Science: Heritage Materials

Conservation Science: Heritage Materials

5.0 1
by B Des Barker
     
 

This book provides an essential guide and reference source for those working in all areas of heritage conservation.See more details below

Overview

This book provides an essential guide and reference source for those working in all areas of heritage conservation.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A useful tool for students.......This book should definitely be of great use for conservators and conservations scientists during their professional life.
Materials Today
It brings together a thorough description of wide range of heritage materials in one comprehensive volume.... a very good introduction to conservation science.
The Nautical Archaeology Society
A detailed read of this book provides new and interesting information even for a veteran conservator of shipwreck materials...a wonderful commentary on contemporary collection practices including materials such as leather, stone, plastics and wall paintings.
Chemistry World
A useful tool for students.......This book should definitely be of great use for conservators and conservations scientists during their professional life.
25 June 2007 (Yvette Staelens) Chemistry and Industry
I can envisage this book being relevant to these museum students and a range of heritage disciplines. The Book will also serve the needs of conservation professionals seeking well researched accessible information on materials....general reader with basic science knowledge should have no difficulty in following the text.A good mix of theoretical and practical perspectives.Throughout there is a great deal of 'how to' and 'how not to' field-tested advice. I fully expect that it will have a long life on the shelves of graduates, professionals and science enthusiasts.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780854046591
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry, The
Publication date:
01/30/2007
Series:
Rsc Paperbacks Series
Pages:
390
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Meet the Author

Eric May is Reader in Microbiology in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Portsmouth. He has worked on stone deterioration for 20 years and recently coordinated a EU study to assess the value of biotechnology for remediation of altered stone in buildings. He organised (with Mark Jones at the Mary Rose Trust) an international heritage meeting HMS 2005 in Portsmouth in June 2005.

Mark Jones is Head of Conservation at the Mary Rose Trust, responsible for the treatment of the Tudor warship, The Mary Rose, and her artefacts. Part-time Lecturer in conservation at the Universities of Portsmouth and Southampton, he has an MSc in the biodeterioration of materials and a PhD in marine fouling.

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