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Constellations: A Glow-in-the-Dark Guide to the Night Sky

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Reach for the stars, with this beautiful glow-in-the-dark guide to the science and mythology behind the constellations.

Children will see the stars shining brightly right in their own room with this glow-in-the-dark introduction to the night sky. Each constellation sparkles brilliantly on the page, thanks to the special ink that illuminates the lush artwork. And even as the luminous illustrations encourage stargazing, the kid-friendly text presents a perfect mix of simple ...

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Overview

Reach for the stars, with this beautiful glow-in-the-dark guide to the science and mythology behind the constellations.

Children will see the stars shining brightly right in their own room with this glow-in-the-dark introduction to the night sky. Each constellation sparkles brilliantly on the page, thanks to the special ink that illuminates the lush artwork. And even as the luminous illustrations encourage stargazing, the kid-friendly text presents a perfect mix of simple science and storytelling. Along with very basic astronomical facts about our galaxy and the major constellations are the world myths of the gods and heroes whose names grace today’s star maps. Take the tale of Andromeda—the princess sacrificed to save her father’s kingdom who lives in the long, curved “V” of stars best seen in late fall. With information on constellations from Cygnus the Swan to Orion the Hunter, it’s an appealing, interactive approach to a popular subject.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sally J. K. Davies
This is a very appealing way to introduce the constellations to children. The illustrations have big bright glow-in-the-dark stars right on top of the drawing to match a particular constellation creature. Of course, the reader can only read the text if the lights are on and cannot see the glowing stars unless the lights are off. The illustrations are stylized and elegant, with beautiful misty patterns and swirls in the background texture. This perfectly matches the starry nighttime theme and the grand, heroic legends that the illustrations depict. Most of the popular constellations are included in this book, as well as lesser known ones. Ursa Major; Ursa Minor; Draco, the dragon; Cassiopeia; Orion, the hunter; Taurus, the bull; Andromeda, the Greek princess chained to a rock; Perseus, the hero who rescues Andromeda; Pegasus, the winged horse; Cygnus, the swan; Aquila, the eagle; Hercules; Leo; Gemini; Lyra, the harp; Bootes, the bear driver from the Micmac Indian legends; Canis Major, the greater dog; Sagittarius, the archer; and Scorpius, the scorpion are all featured. Each constellation has a double page illustration with a brief synopsis of the legend related to the particular star formation. In some cases, the author gives tales from other parts of the world to show how different cultures created different stories from the same star clusters. Mostly, it is the ancient Greek legends that are depicted. However, the author includes stories from Japan, China, and North American Native and Inuit traditions. Some tales are from as far away as the Mauri of New Zealand. The back matter contains a few constellation activities that readers can try, as well as an index.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-This slim book tells the mythology behind 19 constellations, including Taurus, Andromeda, and Lyra. Large, colorful illustrations of the various "star pictures" spill over the two pages devoted to each one. Back matter includes instructions for three activities. The brief, clear text serves as a simple introduction to the night sky.-Linda Wadleigh, Haymon-Morris Middle School, Winder, GA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Boiling down content from his more comprehensive Constellations: Stars and Stories (2001), Sasaki presents scattershot references to mythological tales from various cultures associated with 11 constellations, which are depicted in heavily mannered portraits festooned with jagged, fingernail-sized, un-labeled glow-in-the-dark stars. Like nature, Flinn abhors a vacuum, filling background star fields with abstract swirls, spirals, color changes and geometric shapes around puppet-like figures that range from a charging Taurus to lounging representations of Andromeda and Cassiopeia. Though closing with a trio of doable craft projects, this is more a novelty item than a useful guide to the storied heavens-and in a darkened room less like the real thing than the illustrations in C.E. Thompson's Glow In The Dark Constellations: A Field Guide For Young Stargazers (1989) or Nicholas Harris's Glow In The Dark Book Of Space (2002). (Nonfiction. 7-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402703850
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 6/28/2006
  • Pages: 48
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Worthless

    I am absolutely discouraged by the direction that this book along with others of its ilk. Stars, especially the naked-eye visible planets and Constellations are magnicent no matter where you are in the world. When my aircraft went down in the middle of a jungle in South Vietnam on New Year's eve of 1971, in a tidal swamp, with all electronics lost...stars and my knowledge of them saved my life. That information was learner from my Grandfather and it was taught me through the use of the old Greek myths. I knew the Constellations by name, new their position in the ecliptic, knew how the ecliptic seemed to turn as the earth rotated, had a roughly accurate estimate of time based on position and movement, and did not feel alone because the one constant I had was the heavens. I could not have learned that from this book. There are other similar bbbks I would like to see taught but this one just doesn't cut it. Stars are magnificent navigational aid. Learn to use them and know them well. Teach them to your children. Teach them how they rise, how they move, and how they set. In any case, teach them something worth recalling should they ever need the information. Your memory will be blessed.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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