Constraint Theory: Multidimensional Mathematical Model Management / Edition 1

Constraint Theory: Multidimensional Mathematical Model Management / Edition 1

by George Friedman
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1441936262

ISBN-13: 9781441936264

Pub. Date: 12/06/2010

Publisher: Springer US

At first glance, this might appear to be a book on mathematics, but it is really intended for the practical engineer who wishes to gain greater control of the multidimensional mathematical models which are increasingly an important part of his environment. Another feature of the book is that it attempts to balance left- and right-brain perceptions; the author has

Overview

At first glance, this might appear to be a book on mathematics, but it is really intended for the practical engineer who wishes to gain greater control of the multidimensional mathematical models which are increasingly an important part of his environment. Another feature of the book is that it attempts to balance left- and right-brain perceptions; the author has noticed that many graph theory books are disturbingly light on actual topological pictures of their material. One thing that this book is not is a depiction of the Theory of Constraints, as defined by Eliyahu Goldratt in the 1980’s. Constraint Theory was originally defined by the author in his PhD dissertation in 1967 and subsequent papers written over the following decade. It strives to employ more of a mathematical foundation to complexity than the Theory of Constraints. This merely attempts to differentiate this book from Goldratt’s work, not demean his efforts. After all, the main body of work in the field of 1 Systems Engineering is still largely qualitative .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781441936264
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
12/06/2010
Series:
IFSR International Series on Systems Science and Engineering, #23
Edition description:
Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2005
Pages:
188
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.36(d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Motivations 1

What Is Constraint Theory And Why Is It Important?

1.1 Trends and Problems in System Technologies

1.2 An Example of Low Dimension

1.3 The Manager and Analyst Continue their Dialogue

1.4 Preliminary Conclusions

1.5 A Little Window into Future Chapters

1.6 Problems for the Curious Reader

Chapter 2 The Four-Fold Way 25

How to Perceive Complex Mathematical Models and Well-Posed Problems

2.1 Prologue: The Manager and Analyst Discuss the Origins of Multidimensional Models and Well-Posedness

2.2 The First View: Set Theoretic

2.3 The Second View: Family of Submodels

2.4 The Third View: The Bipartite Graph

2.5 The Fourth View: The Constraint Matrix

2.6 Model Consistency and Computational Allow Ability

2.7 The Manager and Analyst Continue their Dialogue

2.8 Chapter Summary

2.9 Problems for the Interested Student

Chapter 3 General Results 49

From Protomath to Math to Metamath

3.1 Language and Mathematics

3.2 Most General Trustworthy Results

3.3 Classes of Relations

3.4 Manager and Analyst Revisited

3.5 Chapter Summary

3.6 Problems for the General Student

Chapter 4 Regular Relations 61

Searching for the Kernels of Constraint

4.1 Cognitive Barriers to Circuits

4.2 Node, Knot and Basic Nodal Square Sanctification

4.3 Useful Properties of Bapartite Graphs

4.4 Cornering the Culprit Kernels; Ten Easy Pieces

4.5 Continuing the Pursuit Inside the Circuit Clusters (CC)

4.6 Locating the BNSs in Minutes, Not University Lifetimes

4.7 Comparison of Computational Complexity; Trillions and Trillions of Times Faster

4.8 Zero Constraint All Along the Computational Path

4.9 Recapitulation of Computational Flow

4.10 General Procedure for Determining Consistency and Allow Ability in a Model of Regular Relations

4.11 Summary of Chapter and Constraint Theory Toolkit

4.12 Queries for the Regular Student

Chapter 5 Discrete and Interval Relations 111

The Diminished Utility of Metamodels

5.1 Metamodel Issues and Perspectives

5.2 The General Taxonomy and Primary Property of Discrete Relations

5.3 Bolean Relations

5.4 Topological Implications

5.5 Allowability of Discrete Computations

5.6 Inequality Relations

5.7 Summary

5.8 Problems for the Discrete Student

Chapter 6 The Logical Structure of Constraint Theory 129

A Compact Summary

6.1 Overview

6.2 Postulates and Philosophical Assumptions

6.3 Definitions

6.4 Theorems

6.5 Graphs of the Logical Structure of Constraint Theory

6.6 Completeness

Chapter 7 Examples of Constraint Theory Applied to Real-World Problems 137

7.1 Apologies Not Required

7.2 Cost as an Independent Variable (CAIV)

7.3 The Kinematics of Free-Fall Weapons

7.4 The Deflection of an Earth-Threatening Asteroid Employing Mass Drivers

Chapter 8 Manager and Analyst Meet Again 157

Gists and Schizophrenia

Appendices

Appendix A Computational Request Disappointments; Results of the USC Allowability Project 163

Appendix B Graph Theory Overview 171

Appendix C The Logic of "IF" and "IF and Only IF" 175

Appendix D Vector Spaces Applied to Graph Theory 177

References 181

Index 183

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