Consumer's Guide to Alternative Medicine: A Close Look at Homeopathy, Acupuncture, Faith Healing and Other Unconventional Treatments

Overview

Butler disposes of the myths and madness perpetrated by fringe practitioners, bogus nutritionists, "health pornographers," and the "quackery mafia." Laying bare the absurdities and dangers of some popular diets and the unethical behavior of health gurus, he also shows how some unscientific "healing cults" are getting their dogma written into state law, defrauding the public and siphoning off billions of healthcare dollars.

After decades of bestselling books that ...

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Overview

Butler disposes of the myths and madness perpetrated by fringe practitioners, bogus nutritionists, "health pornographers," and the "quackery mafia." Laying bare the absurdities and dangers of some popular diets and the unethical behavior of health gurus, he also shows how some unscientific "healing cults" are getting their dogma written into state law, defrauding the public and siphoning off billions of healthcare dollars.

After decades of bestselling books that promote killer diets, worthless supplements, dangerous self-care regimens, and assorted health misinformation, the time has come for a book that clarifies the issues and sets straight the facts on homeopathy, acupuncture, faith-healing, and other unconventional treatments.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Butler, no stranger to fraudulent health claims and quackery (he was founder and president of the Quackery Action Council) here presents a rogue's gallery of physicians, pseudo-scientists and self-appointed guardians of health, contending that they have taken Americans for the proverbial ride through rip-offs, health misinformation and just plain fraud. Although attacks on these people--who include Stuart Berger, M.D., Gary Null, Earl Mindell and Lendon Smith, M.D.--are hardly new, Butler's message of prevalent health fraud in alternative therapies does bear repeating. In addition to taking swipes at various alternative and New Age therapies, from homeopathy to crystal and faith healing and Christian Science, Butler bears down especially hard on chiropractors, calling them ``masters of doubletalk and weasel wording.'' The media, he says--the Phil Donahues, Oprahs, Larry Kings and Geraldo Riveras--are also to blame for quackery. He hits on consumer magazines, names publishers who in the past have published books he believes are detrimental to health and chides Publishers Weekly book reviews for allegedly promoting suspect alternative therapies. Butler makes helpful suggestions about how to be a smart but skeptical health-care consumer, as well as about what other professionals (nurses, dentists, physicians, pharmacists, ethical chiropractors, librarians) can do. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Butler, a nutritionist, attacks just about every alternative therapy in existence, including crystal healing, aromatherapy, and astrological counseling. Much of his data can be found in other works ( The Health Robbers , edited by Stephen Barrett and Gilda Knight, LJ 12/1/76), but he provides hard-to-find information refuting ultra-fringe therapies like firewalking and live cell analysis. Librarians may not appreciate his list of ``book publishers to beware of,'' his suggestions that they place warning labels in books promoting unconventional therapies, or his allegation that many book reviews in Library Journal and Publishers Weekly ``are done by non-experts who cannot tell the difference between a fact and a piece of nonsense.'' This is an extremely one-sided book mainly for libraries that collect heavily in alternative medicine. Others need more balanced viewpoints.--Natalie Kupferberg, Montana State Univ. Lib., Bozeman
Booknews
An assault on bogus healing claims, certainly a justifiable campaign. Detracting from the credibility of the author's itemization of unproven cures is his failure to explore the holes and fallacies of conventional medicine. Many people who've experienced the discrepancy between what conventional medicine "knows" and what it really knows will continue to seek help elsewhere. At least this compendium can alert seekers to some snake oil sales techniques. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780879757335
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 6/28/1992
  • Pages: 1
  • Product dimensions: 5.88 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 0.94 (d)

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