Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the United States, 2005–2008

Consumption of Sugar Drinks in the United States, 2005–2008

by Cynthia L. Ogden, Brian K. Kit, Margaret D. Carroll
     
 
Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States has increased over the last 30 years among both children and adults (1–3). Sugar drinks have been linked to poor diet quality, weight gain, obesity, and, in adults, type 2 diabetes (4,5). U.S. dietary guidelines issued in 2010 recommend limiting the consumption of foods and beverages with added sugars (6).

Overview

Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States has increased over the last 30 years among both children and adults (1–3). Sugar drinks have been linked to poor diet quality, weight gain, obesity, and, in adults, type 2 diabetes (4,5). U.S. dietary guidelines issued in 2010 recommend limiting the consumption of foods and beverages with added sugars (6). Moreover, the American Heart Association has recommended a consumption goal of no more than 450 kilocalories (kcal) of sugar-sweetened beverages—or fewer than three 12-oz cans of carbonated cola—per week (7). This brief presents the most recent national data on sugar-drink consumption in the United States. Results are presented by sex, age, race and ethnicity, and income. Where sugar drinks are consumed and obtained is also presented.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013863729
Publisher:
The Delano Max Wealth Institute, LLC.
Publication date:
12/12/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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