Contagious Holiness: Jesus' Meals with Sinners

Overview

Honored in 2006 as a "Year's Best Book for Preachers" by Preaching magazine.

One of humanity's most basic and common practices--eating meals--was transformed by Jesus into an occasion of divine encounter. In sharing food and drink with his companions, he invited them to share in the grace of God. He revealed his redemptive mission while eating with sinners, repentant and unrepentant alike.

Jesus' "table fellowship" with sinners in the Gospels ...

See more details below
Paperback
$20.56
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$24.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $10.49   
  • New (3) from $14.60   
  • Used (4) from $10.49   
Sending request ...

Overview

Honored in 2006 as a "Year's Best Book for Preachers" by Preaching magazine.

One of humanity's most basic and common practices--eating meals--was transformed by Jesus into an occasion of divine encounter. In sharing food and drink with his companions, he invited them to share in the grace of God. He revealed his redemptive mission while eating with sinners, repentant and unrepentant alike.

Jesus' "table fellowship" with sinners in the Gospels has been widely agreed to be historically reliable. However, this consensus has recently been challenged, for example, by the claim that the meals in which Jesus participated took the form of Greco-Roman symposia--or that the "sinners" involved were the most flagrantly wicked within Israel's society, not merely the ritually impure or those who did not satisfy strict Pharisaic standards of holiness.

In this excellent and thorough study, Craig L. Blomberg engages with the debate and opens up the significance of the topic. He surveys meals in the Old Testament and the intertestamental period, examines all the Gospel texts relevant to Jesus' eating with sinners, and concludes with contemporary applications.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

D.A. Carson
"Dr. Blomberg not only addresses current disputes about the 'table fellowship' practices of the historical Jesus, but also traces out the historical and theologically laden implications of table fellowship across the canon of Scripture, and issues a call to contemporary Christians to reform their habits in this matter."
D. A. Carson
"Dr. Blomberg not only addresses current disputes about the 'table fellowship' practices of the historical Jesus, but also traces out the historical and theologically laden implications of table fellowship across the canon of Scripture, and issues a call to contemporary Christians to reform their habits in this matter."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780830826209
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press
  • Publication date: 8/2/2005
  • Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology
  • Pages: 216
  • Sales rank: 1,349,455
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Craig L. Blomberg (Ph.D., Aberdeen) is Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary in Denver, Colorado. His books include Interpreting the Parables, Neither Poverty nor Riches, Jesus and the Gospels: An Introduction and Survey, The Historical Reliability of John's Gospel, commentaries on Matthew and 1 Corinthians, Making Sense of the New Testament: 3 Crucial Questions and Preaching the Parables.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Series preface
Author's preface
Abbreviations1. The current debate
"Sinners who need no repentance"
Did Jesus really eat with the wicked?2. Forming friendships but evading enemies
Meals in the Old Testament
The Pentateuch
The historical books
The Wisdom literature
The prophets
Conclusion3. Contagious impurity
Intertestamental developments
Old Testament Apocrypha
The pseudepigrapha
Qumram and the Dead Sea Scrolls
Greco-Roman symposia
Conclusions4. Jesus the consummate party animal?
Jesus' eating with sinners in the Gospels I: material not distinctive to Luke
Levi's party: Mark 2:13-17 and parallels
Feasting in the wilderness: Mark 6:30-44 and parallels
A repeat miracle: Mark 8:1-10 and parallels
How not to win friends and influence people: Matthew 8:11-16 and parallel
A glutton and a drunkard: Matthew 11:19 and parallels
Tax collectors and prostitutes: Matthew 21:31-32
The joy of new wine: John 2:1-11
A meal of reinstatement: John 21:1-14
Summary and conclusion5. Pervasive purity
Jesus' eating with sinners in the Gospels II: material distinctive to Luke
A "sinner in the city": Luke 7:36-50
Hospitality versus holiness: Luke 10:38-42
A meal turned sour: Luke 11:37-54
A cagey host and a rude guest: Luke 14:1-24
A scandalous summary: Luke 15:1-32
Zacchaeus short-changed? Luke 19:1-10
Cleopas and company: Luke 24:13-35
Summary and conclusion6 The potential of contemporary Christian meals
Conclusions and applications
Summary
Applications
Bibliography
Index of modern authors
Index of Scripture references
Index of ancient sources
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)