Contemporary Britain / Edition 2

Contemporary Britain / Edition 2

1.0 1
by John McCormick
     
 

ISBN-10: 0230002145

ISBN-13: 9780230002142

Pub. Date: 10/16/2007

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

A British native, McCormick (political science, Indiana U., Indianapolis) has lived much of his life elsewhere, including much of the past 17 years in the U.S. He presents a concise overview of contemporary Britain, examining how and why it is a different nation from that of the past, and the causes and effects of recent changes in the UK. Coverage includes an

Overview

A British native, McCormick (political science, Indiana U., Indianapolis) has lived much of his life elsewhere, including much of the past 17 years in the U.S. He presents a concise overview of contemporary Britain, examining how and why it is a different nation from that of the past, and the causes and effects of recent changes in the UK. Coverage includes an historical overview, focusing on postwar history; geography and resources; the social class system; politics and government; civil society; the economy; culture and lifestyle; and Britain's place in the world. Written for students, but accessible to the general reader, the text assumes no previous knowledge on the topic. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780230002142
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
10/16/2007
Series:
Contemporary States and Societies Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 8.61(h) x 0.61(d)

Table of Contents


List of Illustrations, Maps, Figures, Tables and Boxes     vii
Preface and Acknowledgments     x
List of Abbreviations     xii
Introduction     1
The Historical Context     7
The Emergence of the British State     8
Postwar Adjustment, 1945-79     18
The Thatcher Revolution, 1979-90     25
Blair and Beyond     28
Land and People     34
The Geography of Britain     35
Natural Resources     39
The Environment     44
The People of Britain     48
Nationalism and Regionalism     52
Immigration and Race     58
The Social System     62
Social Class     63
The Changing Family     69
Social Services and Health Care     71
Education     78
Law and Order     84
Government and the Political System     89
Principles of Government     90
The Constitution     93
The Monarchy     96
Prime Minister and Cabinet     100
Parliament     106
The Judiciary     111
The Bureaucracy     112
Local Government     114
Politics and Civil Society     118
Political Culture     119
Elections     126
Political Parties     131
Interest Groups     139
The Media     142
The Economy     147
The Structure of the Economy     148
From Hands-off to Hands-on, and Back Again     156
Britain in the International System     165
The Economic Implications of Europe     169
Culture and Lifestyle     176
Culture     177
The Identity of Britain     181
The Arts     184
Sports and Leisure     193
Religion     198
Britain and the World     203
The Changing British Role in the World     204
The Commonwealth     206
The Atlantic Alliance     210
Britain and the European Union     215
The Changing Role of the British Military     226
Conclusions     232
Recommended Reading     236
Britain Online     240
Bibliography     242
Index     253

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Contemporary Britain 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
John McCormick is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). Brought up in Kenya, he went to private school in Britain, university in South Africa, and has lived in the USA since 1986. He aims to give a brief and accessible account of Britain, but is not objective. As he writes, the book makes two core arguments, that claims of decline are overblown, and that our future lies with the European Union. His chapters cover Britain¿s history, land and people, social system, government, politics and civil society, the economy, culture and lifestyle, and Britain and the world. He notes and applauds the recent rise in immigration from the new EU member states. He distinguishes classes by the kind of work done, i.e. both manual and non-manual workers have to work for a living. So `middle class¿ is just a posh, banal, term for non-manual workers. He argues that social mobility is increasing, and then cites evidence that proves that it isn¿t. His is the conventional, establishment, point of view. He describes the trade union movement as an interest group, and does not even mention industry in the index. He claims that there have been three big influences on post-war Britain - the end of empire, the EU and Thatcherism - and concludes, ¿the changes that have come out of these three broad forces have been overwhelmingly positive.¿ His blatant passion for Thatcher and capitalism leads straight to his passion for the EU. He sums up, ¿Whether they like it or not, and many do not, the British are daily being further integrated into the networks that have pulled the states of Europe closer together since the early 1950s. European law permeates British law. European policy plays a central role in areas as diverse as agriculture, consumer protection, the environment, fisheries, trade, transport and working conditions ¿ Eventual membership of the euro is all but inevitable, as are the creation of a European military force and the development of common European foreign and security policies.¿ He is one of the chorus driving us into ever closer union `whether we like it or not¿. But we do not like it, and we do not accept it.