Contemporary Politics in the Far East

Contemporary Politics in the Far East

by Stanley Kuhl Hornbeck
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally…  See more details below

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940024349076
Publisher:
D. Appleton and company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
809 KB

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CHAPTER III China: Reconstruction And Rebellion. Steps Toward A Constitution As far back as 1908 the Manchu government had issued a body of articles indicative of what it intended to make the contents of a constitution. It had then promised that a constitutional government would be established in 1917. The Provisional Assemblies and the National Assembly had immediately demanded that a constitutional regime be inaugurated at an earlier date. After prolonged controversy the Manchus had promised that the change should be effected in 1913. Still the country was not satisfied and the revolution came on as we have seen. On November 3, 1911, when the country was already in arms, and after they had made Yuan Shih-kai their prime minister, the Manchus ,i0 promulgated constitutional promise in the form of a document known as the "Nineteen Articles." In this it was provided that the powers of the Emperor should be limited by a constitution which was to be drafted by the Advisory Council; that the power of amending this constitution should be vested in parliament; that members of the Imperial House should be ineligible for seats in the cabinet; that the cabinet should be responsible to parliament; that parliament should have the control of the budget; and that action for the making good of these promises should be taken at once by the Advisory Council. These concessions came, however, too late. Although the Advisory Council at once put the articles in force and the Regent resigned, giving full control to Yuan Shih-kai as premier, the .revolution was on and the people had no longer any confidence in the promises of the government. Within a month after the outbreak of the revolution,fourteen provinces had declared themselves independent of the Manchu government. The leaders in...

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