Contemporary Youth Culture: An International Encyclopedia

Overview

Youth as a unique group is a 20th century idea. The changes wrought worldwide by World War II, propelled adolescence to a status and identity that coincided with unparalleled economic growth. While developmental psychologists refined their theories of normal growth and maturation, society and the media were at work constructing youth as consumers,thereby liberating them from traditional family controls. An increasingly smaller world impinges mightily on the culture of youth. An international and ...

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Overview

Youth as a unique group is a 20th century idea. The changes wrought worldwide by World War II, propelled adolescence to a status and identity that coincided with unparalleled economic growth. While developmental psychologists refined their theories of normal growth and maturation, society and the media were at work constructing youth as consumers,thereby liberating them from traditional family controls. An increasingly smaller world impinges mightily on the culture of youth. An international and inter-disciplinary roster of experts shed light by exploring such topics as hip hop culture; punk culture; social justice movements; video games; political activism; language and identity; post-feminism; television; rites of passage; heterosexuality and homosexuality; race and ethnicity; social class; poetry and literature; visual art; conceptions of beauty and body image; academics; sports; drugs; families; refugee youth; the Internet; youth journalism; fashion; and violence. This authoritative and reliable guide will prove accessible and fascinating to adults and adolescents.

Youth as a unique group is a 20th century idea. The changes wrought worldwide by WWII, propelled adolescence to a status and identity that coincided with unparalleled economic growth. While developmental psychologists refined their theories of normal growth and maturation, society and the media were at work constructing youth as consumers,thereby liberating them from traditional family controls. An increasingly smaller world impinges mightily on the culture of youth. An international and inter-disciplinary roster of experts shed light on today's youth culture by exploring such topics as hip hop culture; punk culture; social justice movements; video games; political activism; language and identity; post-feminism; television; rites of passage; heterosexuality and homosexuality; race and ethnicity; social class; poetry and literature; visual art; conceptions of beauty and body image; academics; sports; drugs; families; refugee youth; the Internet; youth journalism; fashion; and violence. Adults and adolescents will find this authoritative and reliable guide accessible and fascinating.

In addition to excellent essays, users will find a timeline of contemporaneous international develpments in youth culture. An introductory essay places youth in historical and contemporary contexts and underscores the notion that despite their power as consumers in a market-oriented world, youth are still seen—and see themselves—in contradictory ways. In short, this work brings new understanding to the complex and fluid phenomenon of youth culture.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Mary Arnold
Although not strictly in an alphabetic encyclopedia format, this collection of informative and thought-provoking articles, organized in subject sections, posits that it is more essential than ever for professionals working for positive youth development to stay current on recent scientific and sociological research. It offers insight into these questions: How is today's teen culture both an extension and reflection of a wider culture? Where are the areas that intersect what has come before with what is unique to today's young people and their experiences? What must twenty-first-century teens deal with as they mature-it is hoped-into successful and emotionally stable adults who can take their place in society? Pertinent poetry and song lyrics precede each section, with articles on everything from activism and media to immigration, sports, and alternative subcultures. Contributors represent international scholars and educators in a variety of academic disciplines; some articles are more academic, but all are accessible reads. Although this set is not a necessary purchase, for the price, it is worthwhile for larger libraries, universities, and youth service organizations.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780313327162
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/28/2005
  • Edition description: 2 Volume Set
  • Pages: 720
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

SHIRLEY STEINBERG is Associate Professor Head and Program Head, Graduate Literacy, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, and a member of the graduate education faculty, CUNY Graduate Center. She is known internationally for her writing on youth cuture and education.

PRIYA PARMAR is Assistant Professor, Literacy, Adolescence Program, Brooklyn College, City University of New York. She has written on hip hop and urban art and culture for Critical Thinking: An Encyclopedia (GPG 2003) and Urban Education: An Encyclopedia (GPG forthcoming).

BIRGIT RICHARD is University Professor for New Media, University of Frankfurt, Institute for Art Education, Germany. She lectures extensively in Europe and the United States.

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Table of Contents

Section One: Studying Youth Culture

Why Study Youth Culture?

"Oh Puhleeze?" Learning Youth Culture

Youth Subcultures, Postmodernism, and the Media

A Critical Geography of Youth Culture

Global Youth

Hip Hop Globalization and Youth Culture

Language and Identitiy in Youth Culture

Language and Talk

Problematizing the "Problem" Teen: Reconceptionualizing Adolescent Development

Adolescent Rites of Passage

On Youth and Psychological Investment

Stepfamilies in the United States

Blending Youth and Organizational Cultures

Section Two: Media Culture and Youth

Disney and Consumer Culture

Ageism, Stereotypes, Television

Three-Minute Clip Culture

Techno/House, Hip Hop Clubs and Video

Advertising and German MTV

Raising World Citizens: New Programming for Youth in the United States

Japanese Electronic Game Culture

Dorama; Japanese TV

Anime

Manga

Steal This Article

Online hip Hop Culture

Instant Messaging and Identity

Girl Net Culture

Jammer Girl and the WWW

Queer Youth and the Media

Cripqueers and the Land of Make-Believe

Section Three: Youth Identities and Subcultures

Girl Culture

Eating Disorders and Sexuality

Exploring the Culture of "Sluthood" Among Adolescents

Queer Punk

The Metrosexual and Youth Culture

Teddy Boys

Idols

Remix Culture

Industrial Culture

Industrial Bands

Raggae

Emo Music and Youth Culture

Discos: From Liberation to Commodification of Pleasure

Techno and House Cultures

The Elements and Eras of Hip Hop Culture

Hip Hop, Wiggahs, and Whiteness

Check Me?.....No Check YOU!

Fashion and the Commodity Society

Fashion Brands and Logos

Retro

Fashion andTechno-Style

Wearables

Piercing

Goth

Skateboarding: Between Mainstream and Punk Rock

Air & Style Snowboarding Contest

Paintball: From Marketing Trees to Sport

Public Pedagogy as Spectacle: The Case of the Professional Wrestling

Section Four; Politics and Youth Activism

Youth Mobilization-Strength in Numbers

Kids Against Capital

Guerilla Journalism

Youth Peace-Builders in Community Organizations

Youth in the Black Panther Party

Borikua Guerrero Youth Organizing

SLAM! Genre for Social Activism

Feminists' Daughters

Contemporay Punk Rock and Activism

Teaching and Learning In and Out of School

The Power of Rap as a Form of Literacy

Hip Hop and Education

Transformations Through Hip Hop

"I Write for that Shy Little Girl": Spoken Word's Power to Document

Exceptional Youth Cultures: A Framework for Instructional Strategies

Youth Led Research

A Meeting of the Minds

The Aesththetic Dimension of Youth Culture Education

Punk Rock Performances at Liberty High School

Refugee Youth: At Home, in School, In the Community

Indentity Formation and Academic Achievement "Pieced" Together

The Beauty Incident

English and U.S. Culture

French Immersion Students in Canada

Pop Fiction and Literacy

Youth Culture and Creative Literacy

Organized Youth Sport and Its Alternatives

C.H.A.O.S.

Young Organic Intellectuals in NYC

About the Editors and Contributors

Kinderculture and Marketing: From Toys to Harry Potter

Youth Culture and Video Games

Otaku

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