Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Postliberal Challenge

Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Postliberal Challenge

by Deborah J. Yashar
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521827469

ISBN-13: 9780521827461

Pub. Date: 03/07/2005

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Deborah Yashar analyzes the contemporary and uneven emergence of Latin American indigenous movements—addressing both why indigenous identities have become politically salient in the contemporary period and why they have translated into significant political organizations in some places and not others. She argues that ethnic politics can best be explained

Overview

Deborah Yashar analyzes the contemporary and uneven emergence of Latin American indigenous movements—addressing both why indigenous identities have become politically salient in the contemporary period and why they have translated into significant political organizations in some places and not others. She argues that ethnic politics can best be explained through a comparative historical approach that analyzes three factors: changing citizenship regimes, social networks, and political associational space—providing insight into the fragility and unevenness of Latin America's third wave democracies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521827461
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/07/2005
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics Series
Pages:
388
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.98(d)

Table of Contents

Part I. Theoretical Framing: 1. Questions, approaches, and cases; 2. Citizenship regimes, the state, and ethnic cleavages; 3. The argument: indigenous mobilization in Latin America; Part II. The Cases: 4. Ecuador: Latin America's strongest indigenous movement; 5. The Ecuadorian Andes and ECUARUNARI; 6. The Ecuadorian Amazon and CONFENAIE; 7. Forming the National Confederation, CONAIE; 8. Bolivia: strong regional movements; 9. The Bolivian Andes: the Kataristas and their legacy; 10. The Bolivian Amazon; 11. Peru: weak national movements and subnational variation; 12. Peru. Ecuador, and Bolivia: most similar cases; 13. No national indigenous movement: explaining the Peruvian anomaly; 14. Explaining subnational variation; 15. Conclusion: 16. Democracy and the postliberal challenge in Latin America.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >