Contesting Genres in Contemporary Asian American Fiction

Overview

This book answers recent calls in criticism and theory to examine the influence of genre on contemporary Asian American literary production. Drawing on cultural theories of representation, social theories of identity, and poststructuralist genre theory, Contesting Genres in Contemporary Asian American Fiction shows how popular prose fictions have severely constrained the development of Asian American literary aesthetics. Betsy Huang elucidates the ways in which highly structured genres such as immigrant fiction, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$92.15
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$95.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $64.73   
  • New (3) from $87.70   
  • Used (5) from $64.73   
Contesting Genres in Contemporary Asian American Fiction

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$95.00
BN.com price

Overview

This book answers recent calls in criticism and theory to examine the influence of genre on contemporary Asian American literary production. Drawing on cultural theories of representation, social theories of identity, and poststructuralist genre theory, Contesting Genres in Contemporary Asian American Fiction shows how popular prose fictions have severely constrained the development of Asian American literary aesthetics. Betsy Huang elucidates the ways in which highly structured genres such as immigrant fiction, crime fiction, and science fiction have been principal forces in the creation and maintenance of Orientalist representations in U.S. culture and argues that many contemporary Asian American writers deliberately write in these genres to counteract the limits of such representations at their constitutive sources.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The brilliance of Huang’s work is that she makes readers rethink and reconsider genres that are often interfaced with and considered in reductive ways."--Asian American Literature Fans

“Huang does a masterful job of interrogating genre’s relationship to knowledge production. In her efforts to develop a ‘transformative Asian American politics of form,’ Huang treats both established and emergent Asian American writers and through her focus on three highly structured types of genre fiction--immigrant fiction, crime fiction, and science fiction--she encourages critics to not just read familiar texts differently, but to read a variety of texts that don’t currently rest easily within the rubric of ‘Asian American literature.’ This project should cement Huang’s position as a leading scholar in the field of Asian American genre criticism.”--Tina Chen, The Pennsylvania State University and author of Double Agency: Acts of Impersonation in Asian American Literature and Culture

Contesting Genres in Contemporary Asian American Fiction broadens and invigorates critical studies of genres in Asian American literature, offering nuanced, theoretically informed analyses of generic characteristics, including those of crime fiction and science fiction. It makes a compelling argument for the necessity to understand genres as social constructs, as modes of knowledge production, and as disciplinary techniques of subject constitution.”--Zhou Xiaojing, Professor of English, University of the Pacific

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230108318
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 12/7/2010
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Betsy Huang is Associate Professor of English at Clark University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: "Generic" Asian Americans? 1

Troubling the Generic Waters 1

"Regenreing" Fictions of Asian America 4

1 Generic Sui Generis: On Asian American Immigrant Fiction 11

Genres of Assimilationism 11

le thi diem thuy and The "I" We Are All Looking For 17

Chang-rae Lee and the Counter-Gestures of Life Writing 29

2 Recriminations: On Asian American Crime Fiction 47

Criminalizing Asian America 47

The Offenses of Charlie Chan and Chinatown 51

The Difficult Case of Asian American Crime Fiction 55

Dashiell Hammett's Chinatown: "Dead Yellow Women" 59

Wayne Wang's Chinatown: Chan Is Missing 66

Ed Lin's Chinatown: This Is a Bust 72

Susan Choi's Radical Recriminations: American Woman 80

3 Reorientations: On Asian American Science Fiction 95

Alienating Asian America 95

Retooling Asian American Fiction, Regenreing Science Fiction 100

Exemplary Estrangement: Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life" 102

Mechanical Aspirations: Greg Pak's Robot Stories 113

Future Imperfect: Cynthia Kadohata's In the Heart of the Valley of Love 127

Conclusion: The Genre is the Message 141

Notes 147

Bibliography 169

Index 179

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)