Continuum Encyclopedia of Modern Criticism and Theory

Overview

The Continuum Encyclopedia of Modern Criticism and Theory offers the student and scholar of literary and cultural studies the most comprehensive, single volume guide to the history and development of modern criticism in the humanities. In a clearly organized format, this major reference work takes the reader through introductions to historically influential philosophers, literary critics, schools of thought and movements from Spinoza and Descartes to Phenomenology and Heidegger, before turning to its three ...

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Overview

The Continuum Encyclopedia of Modern Criticism and Theory offers the student and scholar of literary and cultural studies the most comprehensive, single volume guide to the history and development of modern criticism in the humanities. In a clearly organized format, this major reference work takes the reader through introductions to historically influential philosophers, literary critics, schools of thought and movements from Spinoza and Descartes to Phenomenology and Heidegger, before turning to its three principal areas of critical attention: Europe, North America and Great Britain.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This new single-volume introduction to the history of criticism in the humanities should find a welcome and useful place in most reference collections. More than 100 essays, varying in length from three to ten pages and written by experts in the various fields of criticism, are divided into three main sections. Part 1, "Critical Discourse in Europe" (the most extensive with 54 essays), begins with Descartes and Spinoza and ends with an essay by Nicholas T. Rand on French psychoanalytic literary criticism. Part 2, "Theories and Practice of Criticism in North America," begins with an excellent short essay by Kenneth Womack on Charles Sanders Peirce and semiotics and concludes with an essay by David Alderson on masculinity and cultural studies. Part 3, "Criticism, Literary and Cultural Studies in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales," deals with the history and development of criticism and literary and cultural studies in the United Kingdom from Coleridge to British poststructuralism after 1968. The brevity of the essays generally precludes real in-depth analysis and explication of the various topics covered, but that is not the purpose of this volume, which is to provide an overview of the development of humanities criticism. To this end, it succeeds exceptionally well; editor Wolfreys (English, Univ. of Florida) is to be congratulated. Recommended for all academic and public libraries. Terry Skeats, Bishop's Univ. Lib., Lennoxville, Quebec Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
A single-volume guide to the history and development of criticism in the humanities, emphasizing the theory and practice of literary and cultural criticism, but also discussing related and contextual discourses as well as critical overviews of the work and reception of major figures responsible for developing those discourses in the now-related ares of philosophy, poetics, politics, aesthetics, linguistics, and psychoanalysis. Articles introduce historically influential philosophers, literary critics, schools of thought, and movements of the modern era; and consider current debates. The focus is on continental Europe, Britain, and the US. The glossary does not indicate pronunciation. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826414144
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 4/10/2002
  • Pages: 896
  • Product dimensions: 7.06 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 1.94 (d)

Meet the Author


Julian Wolfreys is a Professor of Modern Literature and Culture with the Department of English and Drama at Loughborough University, UK. The author and editor of numerous books and articles, his most recent publications are Writing London III: Inventions of the City (Palgrave) and Transgression: Identity, Place, Time (Palgrave).
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Table of Contents

Foreword Part I Critical Discourse in Europe Rene Descartes and Baruch Spinoza: Beginnings Warren Montag, Occidental College Immanuel Kant and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Jacques Lazra, University of Wisconsin-Madison Johann Christian Friedrich Hölderlin Véronique M. Fóti, Pennsylvania State University Karl Marx Robert C. Holub, University of California, Berkeley Charles Baudelaire and Stéphane Mallarmé Elizabeth Constable, University of California, Davis Friedrich Nietzsche Robert C. Holub, University of California, Berkeley Sigmund Freud Juliet Flower MacCannell, University of California, Irvine Ferdinand de Saussure and Structural Linguistics Kenneth Womack, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Edmund Husserl Claire Colebrook, Stirling University Phenomenology Ullrich Michael Haase, Manchester Metropolitan University Gaston Bachelard and George Canguilhem: Epistemology in France Alison Ross, Monash University, and Amir Ahmadi, University of Sydney Jean Paulhan and/versus Francis Ponge Jan Baetens, Katholieke universiteit, Leuven György Lukács Mitchell R. Lewis, Oklahoma University Russian Formalism, the Moscow Linguistics Circle, and Prague Structuralism: Boris Eichenbaum, Jan Mukarovsky, Victor Shklovsky, Yuri Tynyanov, Roman Jakobson Kenneth Womack, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Ludwig Wittgenstein William Flesch, Brandeis University Martin Heidegger Claire Colebrook, Stirling University Antonio Gramsci Stephen Shapiro, University of Warwick Walter Benjamin Jeremy Tambling, Hong Kong University Reception Theory: Roman Ingarden, Hans-Georg Gadamer and the Geneva School Luke Ferretter, Wolfson College, Cambridge The Frankfurt School, the Marxist Tradition, Culture and Critical Thinking: Max Horkheimer, Herbert Marcuse, Theodor Adorno, Jürgen Habermas Kenneth Surin, Duke University Mikhail Bakhtin R. Brandon Kershner, University of Florida Georges Bataille and Maurice Blanchot Arkady Plotnitsky, Purdue University Bertolt Brecht Loren Kruger, University of Chicago Jacques Lacan Juliet Flower MacCannell, University of California, Irvine The Reception of Hegel and Heidegger in France: Alexandre Kojève, John Hyppolite, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty Jean Michel Rabaté, University of Pennsylvania Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, and Existentialism Mark Currie, Anglia Polytechnic University Emmanuel Levinas Kevin Hart, Monash University Simone de Beauvoir and French Feminism Karen Green, Monash University Claude Lévi-Strauss Boris Wiseman, Durham University Jean Genet Alain-Michel Rocheleau, Univeristy of British Columbia Paul Ricoeur Martin McQuillan, Leeds Uiveristy Roland Barthes Nick Mansfield, University of Melbourne French Structuralism: A. J. Greimas, Tzvetan Todorov and Gérard Genette Dirk de Geest, Katholieke universiteit, Leuven Louis Althusser and his Circle Warren Montag, Occidental College Reception Theory and Reader-Response (I): Hans-Robert Jauss, Wolfgang Iser, and the School of Konstanz Jeremy Lane, University of Sussex Jean-François Lyotard and Jean Baudrillard: The Suspicion of Metanarratives Garry Leonard, Univeristy of Toronto The Social and the Cultural: Michel de Certeau, Pierre Bourdieu and Louis Marin Brian Niro, De Paul University Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari Claire Colebrook, Stirling University Michel Foucault John Brannigan, Queen's University, Belfast Jacques Derrida Kevin Hart, Monash University Luce Irigaray Ewa Ziarek, Notre Dame University Christian Metz Marcia Butzel, Clark University Guy Debord and the Situationist International Lynn A. Higgins, Dartmouth College Umberto Eco SunHee Kim Gertz, Clark University Modernities: Paul Virilio, Gianni Vattimo, Giorgio Agamben David Punter, Bristol University Hélène Cixous Juliet Flower MacCannell, University of California, Irvine Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe and Jean-Luc Nancy Heesok Chang, Vassar College Julia Kristeva Joan Brandt, Claremont Colleges Slavoj Zizek Michael Walsh, University of Hartford Cahiers du Cinéma Maureen Turim, University of Florida Critical Fictions: Experiments in Writing from Le Noveau Roman to the Oulipo Jean Baetens, Katholieke universiteit, Leuven Tel Quel Jean-Michel Rabaté, University of Pennsylvania Other French Feminisms: Sarah Kofman, Monique Wittig, Michèle Le Doeuff Nicole Fluhr, University of Michigan Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism in France Nicholas T. Rand, University of Wisconsin-Madison Part II Theories and Practice of Criticism in North America Charles Sanders Peirce and Semiotics Kenneth Womack, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona The New Criticism Charles Altieri, University of California, Berkeley The Chicago School William Baker, Northern Illinois University Northrop Frye Imre Salusinszky, University of Newcastle, Australia The Encounter with Structuralism and the Invention of Poststructuralism Mark Currie, Anglia Polytechnic University Reception Theory and Reader-Response (II): Norman Holland, Stanley Fish and David Bleich Jeremy Lane, University of Sussex The Yale Critics? J. Hillis Miller, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom, Paul de Man Ortwin de Graef, Katholieke universiteit, Leuven Deconstruction of America William Flesch, Brandeis University Fredric Jameson and Marxist Literary and Cultural Criticism Carolyn Lesjak, Swarthmore College Edward W. Said John Kucich, University of Michigan American Feminisms: Images of Women and Gynocriticism Ruth Robbins, University College, Northampton Feminisms in the 1980s and 1990s: The Encounter with Poststructuralism and Gender Studies Megan Becker-Leckrone, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Psychoanalysis and Literary Criticism Megan Becker-Leckrone, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Feminists of Color Anne Donadey, San Diego State University Stephen Greenblatt and the New Historicism Virginia Mason Vaughan, Clark University Lesbian and Gay Studies/Queer Theory David Van Leer, University of California, Davis Postcolonial Studies Malini Johar Schueller, University of Florida Cultural Studies and Multiculturalism Marcel Cornis-Pope, Virginia Commonwealth University African-American Studies Yun Hsing Wu, Indiana University Chicano/a Literature Amelia Mariá de la Luz Montes, University of Nebraska, Lincoln Film Studies Toby Miller, New York University Feminist Film Studies and Film Theory Julian Wolfreys, University of Florida Ethical Criticism Kenneth Womack, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona Postmodernism Marcel Cornis-Pope, Virginia Commonwealth University The Role of Journals in Theoretical Debate Kate Flint, Linacre College, Oxford University Whiteness Studies Betsy Nies, University of North Florida Masculinity and Cultural Studies David Alderson, Manchester University Part III Criticism, Literary and Cultural Studies in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Matthew Arnold Ortwin de Graef, Katholieke universiteit, Leuven John Ruskin and Walter Pater: Aesthetics and the State Jonathan Loesberg, American University Oscar Wilde: Aesthetics and Criticism Megan Becker-Leckrone, University of Nevada, Las Vegas The Cambridge School: Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, I. A. Richards and William Empson Jeremy Tambling, Hong Kong University James Joyce: Theories of Literature Jean Michel Rabaté, University of Pennsylvania Virginia Woolf: Aesthetics Jane Goldman, University of Dundee T. S. Eliot K. M. Newton, University of Dundee After the "Cambridge School": F. R. Leavis Jeremy Tambling, Hong Kong University J. L. Austin and Speech-Act Theory William Flesch, Brandeis University Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams and the Emergence of Cultural Studies David Alderson, Manchester University Raymond Williams Andrew Milner, Monash University Stuart Hall John Brannigan, Queen's University, Belfast Terry Eagleton Moyra Haslett, Queen's University, Belfast Screen Antony Easthope, Manchester Metropolitan University Structuralism and the Structuralist Controversy Niall Lucy, Murdoch University The Spread of Literary Theory in Britain Peter Barry, University of Wayles, Aberystwyth Feminism and Poststructuralism Ashley Tauchert, Exeter University Cultural Studies Ian Baucom, Duke University Cultural Materialism John Brannigan, Queen's University, Belfast Postcolonial Studies Gail Ching-Liang Low, University of Dundee Gay/Queer and Lesbian Studies, Criticism and Theory John M. Clum, Duke University Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, and Post-Marxism Paul Bowman, Leeds University Psychoanalysis in Literary and Cultural Studies Leigh Wilson, University of Westminster Feminism, Materialism and the Debate on Postmodernism in British Universities Gillian Howie, University of Liverpool British Poststructuralism since 1968 Martin McQuillan, Leeds University Glossary Contributors Index.

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