Cooking & Baking During The War of Northern Aggression

Cooking & Baking During The War of Northern Aggression

by Robert Pelton
     
 
The Horrible Results of Lincoln’s Incredible and Unwarranted War of Northern Aggression

Approximately 620,000 people died in the War for Southern Independence. This is the equivalent of five million deaths by standardizing this figure to match the population in the United States today. This would be 100 times the number of Americans losing their

Overview

The Horrible Results of Lincoln’s Incredible and Unwarranted War of Northern Aggression

Approximately 620,000 people died in the War for Southern Independence. This is the equivalent of five million deaths by standardizing this figure to match the population in the United States today. This would be 100 times the number of Americans losing their lives in the Vietnam War—and 17 times the number of our men and women killed in World War II.

Almost one-fifth of the Americans who served, died during this war.
Approximately 600,000 American soldiers were killed (in close to four years).
This figure includes more than 258,000 Confederate troops and more than 360,000 Union troops.
The death rate in the Civil war was higher than in any other war in American history.
In fact, the death rate claimed more American lives than all of our other wars combined!
Fighting during the Revolutionary War resulted in about 4,500 American battle deaths (in about five and one-half years).
More than 116,500 Americans died in World War I!
More than 450,000 Americans were killed in World War II (in three and one-half years).
Close to 53,650 Americans died during the time the Korean War was fought (a little more than three years).
At least 58,150 Americans met their maker during the Vietnam conflict (approximately eight and one-half years).

Yes, all of this and more took place in a war that really didn’t have to happen in the first place.

Consider these astounding figures:

- One of every four Confederate boys and men aging from 14 to 40, were killed in this reprehensible war.
- Unknown numbers in the hundreds of thousands on both sides in were wounded, lost limbs, or were otherwise maimed.
- Bayard, the son of New York Times correspondent Samuel Williamson’s son, Bayard, was killed in the War on July 2, 1863. As a result of this tragedy, the boy’s father wrote this touching memorial to the memory of his only son. It pretty well sums up the horror and the hope or the entire Civil War: “My pen is heavy, O, you dead, who at Gettysburg have baptized with your blood the second birth of Freedom in America, how you are to be envied! I rise from a grave whose wet clay I have passionately kissed, and I look up and see Christ spanning the battle-field with his feet, and reaching fraternal and loving up to Heaven, His right hand opens the gates of Paradise, --with his left he sweetly beckons to these mutilated, bloody, swollen forms to ascend.”

Cooking and Baking During the War of Northern Aggression is full of delicious foods as prepared and favored by many famous people of days long past. It contains the prized recipes for those dishes cooked by, or eaten by, some of the better known as well as lesser-known figures from the Civil War era of our glorious history. Included are recipes for tastyfor tasty breads and interesting baked goods, skillet southern fried chicken and really good poultry dishes. Here you will also be treated to many taste-tempting soups, stews and stuffings – and, yes, even pickles as well as loads of other wonderful things.

You may wish to try some buttermilk or cherry pie, an array of wonderful desserts, rhubarb punch and other delightful beveragesdelightful beverages. Then make the unique corn bread with a streak of delicious custard running through it. Yes, you can now enjoy a meal exactly like that eaten by those who wore both the blue and the gray during the War Between the States – or as some unreconstructed Southerners still refer to it – the War of Northern Aggression.

Measurements for ingredients used in recipes used in the past would not be recognizable to more modern homemakers. Look at some of those called for in many of recipes from the past.

What exactly would they mean today?

When busily scurrying around the kitchen and preparing a meal, who would be able to properly measure ingredients in such things as a wineglassful?

A saltspoonful of spices?
A dram of liquid?
A pound of eggs?

Here’s a few of the more unusual measurements sometimes used by housewives and others during the Civil War period. The original is first given followed by its modern day counterpart:
Pound of eggs
9 large eggs
12 medium eggs
Pound of solid fat 1 pint
Pound of milk 1 pint
Saltspoonful ¼ teaspoon
Dessertspoonful 2 teaspoons
Wineglassful 4 tablespoons
Tumblerful ½ pint
Teacupful ¾ cup
Coffecupful 1 cup
Kitchencupful 1 cup
1 gill ½ cup
Dash pepper 1/8 teaspoon
1 fluid dram 1 teaspoon

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013509641
Publisher:
Freedom & Liberty Foundation Press
Publication date:
11/22/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Robert W. Pelton proudly claims a heritage going all the way back to well before the War for American Independence. One of Mr. Pelton’s ancestors, John Rogers, came to America on the Mayflower and was one of 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact.

John Smith was one of the founders of Jamestown. Peleg Pelton served as the fifer in the Continental Army at age 18 during the Battle of Saratoga (1777) and again in Yorktown (1781).

Captain Peter Hager was Commander of the Old Stone Fort in Schoharie, New York, in 1780. Captain Bezaleel Tyler took part in the only Revolutionary War Battle in Sullivan County, New York. He fought against Mohawk Chief Thayendeneges, who also known as Joseph Brant.

Mr. Pelton is a member of the Sons of the Revolution and Sons of the American Revolution. For a Power Point Presentation covering the Cooking and Baking During the Civil War Period contact Mr. Pelton at 865-523-9523; 865-776-6644; FAX 865-633-8398; e-mail: , Web: www.robertwpelton.com

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