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Cooking in Cajun Country
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Cooking in Cajun Country

5.0 2
by Chere' Coen, Karl Breaux
 

Travel through southern Louisiana and you’ll quickly learn that Cajun cooking is more than a heavy dose of black pepper or a splash of tangy hot sauce. With more than 100 authentic Cajun recipes from Louisiana’s Acadian parishes, now home cooks can create lip-smacking recipes such as Andouille-Stuffed Pork Loin, Butter Beans with Sausage, Grand Chenier

Overview

Travel through southern Louisiana and you’ll quickly learn that Cajun cooking is more than a heavy dose of black pepper or a splash of tangy hot sauce. With more than 100 authentic Cajun recipes from Louisiana’s Acadian parishes, now home cooks can create lip-smacking recipes such as Andouille-Stuffed Pork Loin, Butter Beans with Sausage, Grand Chenier Crawfish Jambalaya, Sweet Potato en Brochette, and Tried-and-True Pecan Pie. You will also learn a little about the history, people, and culture from which the Cajun cuisine originated. Breaux shows how a true Cajun cooks traditional meals as well as the modern methods of preparing delicious home-cooked meals.

Editorial Reviews

If, as some anthropologists maintain, every culture possesses an identifiable cuisine, Cajuns are well on their way towards fulfilling that requirement. Cajun cuisine is among America's most famous, but least understood cooking styles. This cookbook serves as a tutorial with benefits, providing not only a kitchen-centered course on Cajun culture but also more than 100 authentic Cajun recipes. And the fixings are unforgettable: for example, sample Stuffed Pork Loin, Sweet Potato en Brochette, Baked Ducks Landry, or Tried-and-True Pecan Pie. Worth a second helping.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423604877
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
08/01/2009
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Read an Excerpt

Bayou Goula Prime Rib

This makes a beautiful centerpiece for a glamorous meal-and a happy crowd as well.

1 cup Creole mustard

3/4 cup crushed garlic

8-pound rib-eye roast (do not trim fat)

1 (3.4-ounce) bottle Montreal Steak Seasoning

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Combine the mustard and garlic. Rub mixture on the roast. Sprinkle the seasoning on the roast to coat. Place on baking pan and bake 20 minutes. Turn oven to 325 degrees and cook for 1 hour and 40 minutes more. Let sit for 15 minutes before carving.

Serves 8

Meet the Author

Journalist Cheré Dastugue Coen has been covering the food scene of Louisiana for years, first in her hometown of New Orleans and now in Lafayette, the heart of Cajun Country, where she writes a weekly food column.

Karl Breaux is a French-speaking Cajun, born in Lafayette, who has received awards from the governments of France and Louisiana for his efforts to protect the French language. Karl has cooked for many years at hunting camps, family outings, and public events.

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Cooking in Cajun Country 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Published Aug. 13, 2009, in The Advocate newspaper of Baton Rouge: "Cooking in Cajun Country" by Karl Breaux with Cheré Dastugue Coen (Gibbs Smith, $16.99, paperback) deserves praise for explaining in simple language what Cajun cooking is - and isn't. It explains the nuances of the cuisine and how it has developed and evolved over the 244 years since the first Acadian settlers arrived in Louisiana 10 years after being deported from Nova Scotia by the English. The 160-page book discusses the difference between Creole and Cajun, and points out that real Cajun cuisine is flavorful, not overly seasoned with hot sauce or cayenne pepper. The book divides Cajun country, which it says covers 22 parishes from Mississippi to Texas, into seven regions, with some parishes appearing in more than one region: the Acadian Coast (what are now Ascension, Iberville, St. John the Baptist, West Baton Rouge and St. Charles parishes), The Wetlands (including Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes), Upper Prairie (St. Landry), Lower Prairie (Lafayette, Acadia and Vermilion), the Bayou Region (St. Martin, Iberia), Southwest Louisiana (Cameron, Calcasieu, Vermilion, Iberia) and Marshes and Coast. Cajun country's cuisine differs from region to region, the authors write, and they offer explanations of the sometimes subtle differences along with recipes from each region. As a consequence, the book includes six recipes for gumbo, and each chapter includes recipes for everything from side dishes to desserts. Its 100 recipes range from Belle Rose French Onion Soup to Dark Sugar Pralines.Breaux describes himself as a French-speaking Cajun born in Lafayette with his own television show, "Cajun Karl's Cook'n Adventures." He likes to fish and hunt, and the book reveals that. The recipes are the type that Louisiana men like to cook at fishing or hunting camps. While it includes no photographs, "Cooking in Cajun Country" is attractively designed and illustrated. The book does include listings for food festivals in Cajun country, along with Web sites for additional information; Cajun food Web sites; and Cajun tourism Web sites. "Cooking in Cajun Country" would be a good choice to give as an inexpensive gift to someone who wants to learn about south Louisiana and easy, home-style Cajun cooking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago