Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night

Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night

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by Sallie Ann Robinson
     
 

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Sallie Ann Robinson was born and reared on Daufuskie Island, one of the South Carolina Sea Islands well known for their Gullah culture. Although technology and development were slow in coming to Daufuskie, the island is now changing rapidly. With this book, Robinson highlights some of her favorite memories and delicious recipes from life on Daufuskie, where the

Overview

Sallie Ann Robinson was born and reared on Daufuskie Island, one of the South Carolina Sea Islands well known for their Gullah culture. Although technology and development were slow in coming to Daufuskie, the island is now changing rapidly. With this book, Robinson highlights some of her favorite memories and delicious recipes from life on Daufuskie, where the islanders traditionally ate what they grew in the soil, caught in the river, and hunted in the woods.

The unique food traditions of Gullah culture contain a blend of African, European, and Native American influences. Reflecting the rhythm of a day in the kitchen, from breakfast to dinner (and anywhere in between), this cookbook collects seventy-five recipes for easy-to-prepare, robustly flavored dishes. Robinson also includes twenty-five folk remedies, demonstrating how in the Gullah culture, in the not-so-distant past, food and medicine were closely linked and the sea and the land provided what islanders needed to survive. In her spirited introduction and chapter openings, Robinson describes how cooking the Gullah way has enriched her life, from her childhood on the island to her adulthood on the nearby mainland.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
. . . [E]ach [recipe] could be filed under one or more of the three S's: simple, soul food or seafood.
Publishers Weekly

Spend some time with [Robinson] yourself . . . and you'll feel marvelously satisfied in both your belly and your heart.
Ann Arbor News

[T]he recipes allow us all to savor Robinson's taste of Gullah culture and to recreate her world in our own.
—Jessica B. Harris, from the Foreword

Publishers Weekly

Gullah are the hardscrabble South Carolina Low Country descendants of plantation slaves, and their meals reveal African, Jamaican and Caribbean influences. Robinson was raised on Daufuskie Island, an isolated Gullah bastion near Hilton Head. She combines a memoir of growing up with her nine siblings and down-to-earth recipes to cover each meal of the day. Most of her remembrances involve chores and the fertile life of the island, though she also includes a fine chapter on "Folk Beliefs and Home Remedies," where we learn that ear cleaning should be done with a hen's feather (never a rooster's) and that a "handful of spider web" makes for an excellent bandage. As for the recipes, each could be filed under one or more of the three S's: simple, soul food or seafood. For breakfast, there is Country Fried Fish with Grits. Lunchtime sandwiches include Fried Soft-Shell Crab, which could be paired with 'Fuskie Seafood Gumbo with a stock made from fatback bacon and pig tail. Dinner entrees come stuffed, like Flounder Full of Crabmeat, which can be grilled or steamed. All the dishes can be washed down with one of her seven homemade wines, which generally involve adding five pounds of sugar to five pounds of fruit (like persimmons or peaches) and a gallon of water. (Oct.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Robinson first wrote about her life growing up on Daufuskie Island-off South Carolina and the setting for Pat Conroy's memoir The Water Is Wide-in Gullah Home Cooking the Daufuskie Way. Isolated from the mainland until fairly recently, the island was, as historian Jessica Harris writes in her foreword, a "cultural microclimate where the traditions of times past were kept alive." Along with down-home recipes ranging from Momma's Cracking Muffins to Country Fried Fish with Grits, Robinson includes more reminiscences and anecdotes about her extended family-she was one of 12 children-as well as a chapter on Gullah folk beliefs and home remedies of all sorts. For area libraries and other collections on regional American cooking.


—Judith Sutton

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807831502
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
10/01/2007
Edition description:
1
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Echoes the same reverent note as her much-praised first [book].—Charleston

Time honored recipes are generally quick and straightforward, while still full of the flavor of local ingredients.—Staten Island Advance

Through her books, [Robinson] helps keep culture alive. The unique organization of her book . . . impresses that Gullah is an entire way of life, not just a way to cook. . . . Spend some time with [Robinson] yourself . . . and you'll feel marvelously satisfied in both your belly and your heart.—Ann Arbor News

Cooking the Gullah Way follows the rhythm of a typical day on Daufuskie Island. . . . The book immerses the reader in this culture through Robinson's personal stories and family recipes.—Raleigh News & Observer

From their down-home names to their rich flavors, the recipes allow us all to savor Robinson's taste of Gullah culture and to recreate her world in our own.—Jessica B. Harris, from the Foreword

Sallie Ann Robinson cooks slow and local—and from the heart.—Damon Lee Fowler, Garden & Gun

Ties food and place together in an identity that is designed to cultivate an inclusive and progressive future.—Gastronomica

[Robinson] combines a memoir of growing up with her nine siblings [on Daufuskie Island] and down-to-earth recipes to cover each meal of the day. Most of her remembrances involve chores and the fertile life of the island, though she includes a fine chapter on 'Folk Beliefs and Home Remedies.'. . . As for the recipes, each could be filed under one or more of the three S's: simple, soul food or seafood.—Publishers Weekly

Cooking the Gullah Way is a last glimpse of a fading culture.—Gastronomica

Along with down-home recipes ranging from Momma's Cracking Muffins to Country Fried Fish with Grits, Robinson includes more reminiscences and anecdotes about her extended family as well as a chapter on Gullah folk beliefs and home remedies of all sorts.—Library Journal

Meet the Author

Sallie Ann Robinson is author of Gullah Home Cooking the Daufuskie Way. She now makes her home in Savannah, Georgia.

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Cooking the Gullah Way, Morning, Noon, and Night 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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