Cooking Under Pressure (20th Anniversary Edition)

Cooking Under Pressure (20th Anniversary Edition)

3.2 10
by Lorna J. Sass
     
 

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From the leading authority on speed cooking comes the groundbreaking cookbook that inspired a generation of cooks—now updated and revised for today's tastes and sleek, ultrasafe machines

From the elegant to the ethnic to the traditional, Cooking Under Pressure contains a wealth of flavor-packed recipes for fast, healthy, and delicious meals

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Overview

From the leading authority on speed cooking comes the groundbreaking cookbook that inspired a generation of cooks—now updated and revised for today's tastes and sleek, ultrasafe machines

From the elegant to the ethnic to the traditional, Cooking Under Pressure contains a wealth of flavor-packed recipes for fast, healthy, and delicious meals developed for the modern pressure cooker—a magical appliance that turns out foods in one-third (or less) the standard cooking time without sacrificing flavor or aroma. Lorna Sass introduces us to an eclectic array of dishes that can be prepared on a whim, including classic osso buco (18 minutes), chicken gumbo (9 minutes), and risotto (4 minutes, without stirring!). Even chocolate cheesecake and Grand Marnier bread pudding are done to perfection in short order. Plus, the dramatically shortened cooking times make it possible to prepare cholesterol-free, high-fiber ingredients such as grains and beans at the last minute. The pressure cooker is the cook's best friend!

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Editorial Reviews

Marion Nestle
“Sass makes it clear that good food can not only be delicious, but instantaneous and healthful for eaters as well as the planet… Anyone who doesn’t own a pressure cooker will want one right away.”
Peter Berley
“In her classic book, Lorna Sass dazzles us with her time- and energy-saving techniques and fabulous recipes, from soup to risotto, brisket to cheesecake. Bravo!”
SeriousEats.com
A SeriousEats.com best cookbook of 2010
Judith Barrett
The pressure cooker is the best shortcut for cooking risotto. If you follow Lorna Sass's directions, you'll have a true risotto, with just the right texture and consistency, in less than half the time of the traditional stirring method. —Risotto
Paula Wolfert
At last, the cookbook I've been waiting for, and how well it fills a major gap in my library—a cookbook with good stories, practical information, and delicious food.
Pierre Franey
For saving time and for serious cooking, I much prefer the pressure cooker to a microwave oven. I love these recipes for their variety and rich taste.
Annemarie Colbin
This book is a real treat! I'm especially delighted with all the terrific grain, bean, and vegetable recipes. I'll be using my pressure cooker a lot more often now, thanks to Lorna.
Suzanne Hamlin
Lorna Sass provides total kitchen therapy for those with a fear of pressuring. Now the pressure is on to cook these marvelous, innovative recipes. —New York Daily News
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Just when we had come to accept the microwave oven as the ultimate cooking machine, food historian Sass (Dinner with Tom Jones) has rediscovered the pressure cooker, recently reincarnated in sleek new forms for the 1990s kitchen, "where cooking under pressure has already become a way of life.'' Sass has figured out how to prepare pea soup, applesauce and pearl barley in the pressure cooker without the threat of shrapnel in the kitchen. Her recipes are seductive, ranging from the homey and familiar (Brunswick stew, nine minutes) to the slightly more mod erne (turnips with orange-mustard sauce, two minutes). Chapters on beans, rice and risotto, and grains are so enthusiastically instructional that some pressure-cooker converts may unwittingly create 12 dishes (all in less than 60 minutes) in their haste to taste Sass's creations. Vegetables are fully explored in their own chapter, and bread puddings and cheesecakes highlight the desserts section. Sass convincingly presents her case in an introductory "Pressure Cooker Primer,'' and offers helpful "cooking times at a glance'' charts throughout. Initial sauteing times, though, are misleadingly omitted. (Nov.)
Library Journal
It makes sense that the lowly pressure cooker has been rediscovered, for it is perfect for today's busy cooks. Sass's cookbook, the first one in years on the subject, is a valuable primer to this new/old kitchen tool. She tells how to get the best results from pressure cooking; provides guides to preparing all sorts of vegetables, beans, and grains; and includes a wide variety of recipes. Some are for hearty (but not heavy) soups and stews; others are for more glamorous dishes; all are full of flavor but generally uncomplicated. Strongly recommended. Better Homes & Gardens and Homestyle Book Club alternates.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061707872
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/03/2009
Edition description:
Anniversar
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
309,272
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.90(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Nutty Carrot Soup

Serves 6-8

This, soup has an autumn-orange color and a nutty try crunchy peanut butter for added texture.

5 Minutes under High Pressure

2 tablespoons sweet butter or oil
3 stalks celery, cut into 1/4-inch slices
1 pound carrots, scrubbed, trimmed, and cut into 1/4-inch slices
2 medium apples, such as McIntosh, peeled, cored, and chopped
1 large potato (about 1/2 pound), scrubbed, halved lengthwise, and cut into 1/4-inch slices
5 cups water
1/4-cup peanut, cashew, or almond butter
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
Freshly ground black pepper and grated nutmeg to taste

Heat the butter in the cooker. Add the celery, carrots, apples, and potato and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in the water.

Lock the lid in place and over high heat bring to high pressure. Adjust heat to maintain high pressure, and cook for 5 minutes

Reduce pressure with a quick-release method. Remove the lid, tilting it away from you to allow any excess steam to escape.

Puree the soup in a blender or food processor and blend in the nut butter. Return the soup to the cooker and heat thoroughly. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and nutmeg before serving.


Rock Cornish Hens Stuffed with Apricots and Prunes

Serves 2-4

Here is an easy but elegant dish to serve any time of year. For the hens to hold their shape during cooking, you'll need some kitchen string to truss them.

Depending upon your appetite and the number of accompaniments, two stuffed hens will serve either two or four people.

10-12 Minutes under High Pressure

1 tablespoon oil
2 Rock Cornish hens, about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 poundseach
12 pitted prunes
8 dried apricots
1/2 small lemon, cut into 6 thin slices
1/4 cup finely minced shallots or onions
2 stalks celery, finely minced
1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger
1 cup chicken stock or bouillon
1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste (less if using canned stock or bouillon)
1 1/2 pounds (about 4) sweet potatoes, peeled and halved
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
1/4 cup Grand Marnier

Heat the oil in the cooker. Brown the hens well on both sides. Stuff each hen with 6 prunes and 4 apricots, interspersing the lemon slices among the dried fruits. Truss the hens and set aside.

In the fat remaining in the cooker, sauté the shallots, celery and ginger for 2 minutes. Stir in the stock and salt; scrape up any browned bits that are sticking to the bottom of the pan.

Place the hens side by side in the sauce. (You may need to put one hen on its side.) Place the sweet potatoes on top.

Lock the lid in place and over high heat bring to high pressure, Adjust the heat to maintain high pressure and cook for 10 minutes. Quick-release the pressure and check for doneness by inserting a knife into the drumstick joint; if the meat is still pink, lock the lid back in place, return to high pressure, and cook for another minute or two.

Transfer the hens to a platter; remove the trussing. Reserve in a warm place. Add the orange zest and Grand Marnier and boil the sauce over high heat until the alcohol burns off and the sauce is reduced slightly, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in a sauce boat, pour over the stuffed hens.

Note: For cookers requiring a 2-cup liquid minimum to come up to pressure, add an additional cup of stock. Cook the hens in a steaming basket to raise them partially above the liquid. Before adding the orange zest and Grand Marnier, reduce the sauce by half and continue as directed.

Cooking under Pressure. Copyright © by Lorna Sass. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

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What People are saying about this

Marion Nestle
“Sass makes it clear that good food can not only be delicious, but instantaneous and healthful for eaters as well as the planet… Anyone who doesn’t own a pressure cooker will want one right away.”
Peter Berley
“In her classic book, Lorna Sass dazzles us with her time- and energy-saving techniques and fabulous recipes, from soup to risotto, brisket to cheesecake. Bravo!”

Meet the Author

Lorna Sass, Ph.D., is a culinary historian and a James Beard Award-winning author of many highly acclaimed cookbooks, including Pressure Perfect, The Pressured Cook, and Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure. She has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, Bon Appétit, Prevention, Metropolitan Home, and Woman's Day, among others. She lives in New York City.

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