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Cooking with Fire: Rediscover the Traditional Tastes of Wood-Fired Cooking, from Pork Loin on a Spit to Ash-Roasted Vegetables, Smoked Scallops, Naan in a Tannur, Seared Creme Brulee, and Other Techniques
     

Cooking with Fire: Rediscover the Traditional Tastes of Wood-Fired Cooking, from Pork Loin on a Spit to Ash-Roasted Vegetables, Smoked Scallops, Naan in a Tannur, Seared Creme Brulee, and Other Techniques

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by Paula Marcoux
 

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Revel in the fun of cooking with live fire. This hot collection from food historian and archaeologist Paula Marcoux includes more than 100 fire-cooked recipes that range from cheese on a stick to roasted rabbit and naan bread. Marcoux’s straightforward instructions and inspired musings on cooking with fire are paired with mouthwatering photographs that will

Overview

Revel in the fun of cooking with live fire. This hot collection from food historian and archaeologist Paula Marcoux includes more than 100 fire-cooked recipes that range from cheese on a stick to roasted rabbit and naan bread. Marcoux’s straightforward instructions and inspired musings on cooking with fire are paired with mouthwatering photographs that will have you building primitive bread ovens and turning pork on a homemade spit. Gather all your friends around a fire and start the feast.  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
02/17/2014
Marcoux, the food editor of Edible South Shore magazine, is an expert in the fields of food history and archaeology. Her dual interests meld nicely in this collection, which is as much about creating sources of heat as it is concocting recipes. For those who revel in primitive forms of cookery, there are plenty of adventures to explore, from the simple to the complex. The first chapter, “A Fire and a Stick,” includes instructions on toasting cheese (“impale a cube of cheese upon an implement”), while a section on spit roasting examines how to roast a leg of lamb by dangling it over a fire on a string. And there are well-photographed instructions on not only how to bake naan bread, but also on how to create a Neolithic-era oven that does the baking. Some recipes are irresistibly dangerous. For example, a cocktail called a flip calls for a red-hot poker to be immersed in a glass of rum, beer, and molasses. It’s a drink that would probably come in handy while trying the more time consuming projects such as bean-hole beans, which requires digging a hole, tending a fire within the hole for six hours to create a suitable layer of coals, then burying a pot of beans in the hole to cook for at least half a day. (May)
The Tampa Tribune

“No grill? No problem. Marcoux, a food historian, takes us back to paleo times with this outstanding book about cooking over a campground-style wood fire.”

The Virginian-Pilot

“Paula Marcoux is a connoisseur of fire. She knows how to build one and how to find its sweet spot, and has deep respect for our culinary ancestors, early humans who first took to flame. Her new cookbook, "Cooking with Fire," is a refreshing departure from the pile of grilling cookbooks on the market.”

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

"As much a DIY guide to building heat-harnessing structures as it is a food history lesson with recipes.”
From the Publisher
“No grill? No problem. Marcoux, a food historian, takes us back to paleo times with this outstanding book about cooking over a campground-style wood fire.”

“Paula Marcoux is a connoisseur of fire. She knows how to build one and how to find its sweet spot, and has deep respect for our culinary ancestors, early humans who first took to flame. Her new cookbook, "Cooking with Fire," is a refreshing departure from the pile of grilling cookbooks on the market.”

"As much a DIY guide to building heat-harnessing structures as it is a food history lesson with recipes.”

Seattle Times
“Methodical, authoritative, encyclopedic, Marcoux’s book blazes a mesmerizing trail for contemporary cooks back through the hundreds of millennia since humans first used fire to transform their food.”      

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612121581
Publisher:
Storey Books
Publication date:
05/06/2014
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
419,598
Product dimensions:
8.06(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.75(d)

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What People are Saying About This

author of The Barbecue Bible cookbook series and h Steven Raichlen

"Simply the most stimulating, thought-provoking, and hunger-inducing cookbook to cross my desk in years. Paula Marcoux has scoured the world for every imaginable manifestation of wood-fire cooking. No gas or charcoal grills needed — or allowed."

food historian and author of Savoring the Past: Barbara Ketcham Wheaton

"This fascinating book is handsome, original, a joy to read and a powerful enticement to cook food in wonderful new/old ways."

author of Virgin Territory: An Olive Oil Explo Nancy Harmon Jenkins

"A wonderful book on live-fire cooking, including kitchen fireplace, backyard barbecue pit, and masonry bake oven. It is also a delight to read and full of fascinating nuggets of advice and information."

author of Well Fed 2: More Paleo Recipes for P Melissa Joulwan

"From its fire-building basics to its luscious recipes, Cooking With Fire is a delicious reminder to get dirty, slow down, and savor the crackling warmth of a fire with good friends and good food."

author of From the Wood-Fired Oven Richard Miscovich

"Paula’s archaeologist approach, coupled with instructive photos, imparts an appreciation for traditional cooking methods that can be easily incorporated into your contemporary diet."

food writer and historian Sandy Oliver

"This is a fabulous book — gutsy, good-humored, extremely practical, very motivating, full of fascinating facts, and gorgeously illustrated with truly informative photography."

Meet the Author

Paula Marcoux is a food historian who lives in Plymouth, Massachusetts; she has worked professionally as an archaeologist, cook, and bread-oven builder. She is the food editor of Edible South Shore magazine, writes on food history topics for popular and academic audiences, and consults with museums, film producers, and publishers. She also gives regular workshops on natural leavening, historic baking, and wood-fired cooking. Her web site is www.themagnificentleaven.com.

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Cooking with Fire: Rediscover the Traditional Tastes of Wood-Fired Cooking, from Pork Loin on a Spit to Ash-Roasted Vegetables, Smoked Scallops, Naan 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
SandrasBookNook More than 1 year ago
It's been a long time since I've been so completely fascinated by a cookbook! Cooking with Fire is so much more than just a cookbook. History, information, fire-building techniques and more abound. I had to chuckle first thing in the book when it showed matches, knife, kindling and wood like you had to be shown what you need to build a fire, but it didn't stay that simple. From the basics of toasting a marshmallow, to how to build your own masonry oven (I REALLY want one of these!), this book keeps your attention and entertains as it informs you. Who knew with a rock and a basket of pine needles you could make your own amazing smoked mussels in minutes?!? Scallops wrapped in prosciutto on a flat grill over a wood fire, Twine-Roast Leg of Lamb over an open fire, an old-fashioned Lobster Bake and even Campfire Baklava, there is an amazing array not just of recipes but of a myriad of ways to cook using fire. (Hot Poker Mustard anyone?!) You don't need to spend lots of money for fancy ways to cook outside. Build your own fire pit with instructions and photos to go along with. The directions for the masonry oven cover nearly 12 pages with tons of step by step photos. Even if you don't want to actually make any of these, the history included makes for enjoyable, informative reading. I love this book and highly recommend it. I received a copy of this from Storey Publishing for my honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.