Cool Bopper's Choppers

Cool Bopper's Choppers

by Linda Oatman High, John O'Brien
     
 

Cool Bopper is a bebopper in the Snazzy Catz Jazz Club, losses his choppers in the beboppin' crowd. Like Charlie Parker, Cool Bopper bops hard below silver stars and blue moons of night. One evening, Cool Bopper puts down his saxophone and begins to scat: "A-BOP-BOP-BE-BOP, A-BOP-BOP-BOP!" And out pop his choppers! Now Cool Bopper is not the same without his

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Overview

Cool Bopper is a bebopper in the Snazzy Catz Jazz Club, losses his choppers in the beboppin' crowd. Like Charlie Parker, Cool Bopper bops hard below silver stars and blue moons of night. One evening, Cool Bopper puts down his saxophone and begins to scat: "A-BOP-BOP-BE-BOP, A-BOP-BOP-BOP!" And out pop his choppers! Now Cool Bopper is not the same without his choppers. He can't bop. He can't scat. He can't blow his horn. How will Cool Bopper regain his choppers? Linda Oatman High's jazzy story, with zany illustrations by John O'Brien, takes young beboppers on a wild adventure with rhythm and wordplay.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Saxophonist Cool Bopper pulls in the crowds at the Snazzy Catz Jazz Club—until he loses his choppers during a particularly lively scat. They land in a lady's beehive ‘do, tumble into the toilet when she visits the restroom and "go for a swim below the…dim, sleepin' city." Without his teeth Cool Bopper's song is gone, as are the club's patrons. Bopper goes off to the seaside for comfort and hopefully inspiration. Walking the shore one cold night, he hears music and discovers his teeth blowing on a seashell. His choppers restored, Bopper grabs his sax and the music is back! The text strings consonants and some rhyme into a playful, and occasionally rhythmic, celebration of sound. O'Brien's watercolor-and-ink illustrations sway with the music, with buildings and people grooving across the pages. Some buildings take on the shapes of instruments, and the toilet's innards look a bit like a French horn! Play a little Charlie Parker music before and after reading this be-boppin' book.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3 - Cool Bopper plays a jazzy sax and sings a hoppin' scat: "A-bop-bop-be-bop." But one night he bops so big and loud that he pops his dentures out of his mouth and into the extra-high beehive wig of a woman in the audience. Proudly wearing Bopper's choppers, she grooves her way into the bathroom, where she accidentally drops them "into the/hopper./Splish, splash, flush,/the choppers/swirled, whirled,/smilin' pretty as pearls,/gurglin', circlin'/down . . . ." Without his teeth, Bopper's music goes down the drain, too. He is blue and takes a trip to try to lift his spirits and get his bop back. At the beach, he hears some "groovin',/soothin'/music," and soon finds his choppers, which had washed ashore, blowing a tune through a cone-shaped shell. Without pause, he picks them up, pops them into his mouth, grabs his sax, and begins to wail. High's text has a jazzy riff that is well suited to this humorous story. O'Brien's ink-and-watercolor pointillist illustrations are perfect: filled with cool colors and jaunty motion, they look the way the music sounds. The small notes that pour from Bopper's sax bend and stretch, as do the bodies of the musicians and dancers. Suspend logic and enjoy the fun of this silly tale.-Mary Hazelton, Elementary Schools in Warren & Waldoboro, ME

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
When Cool Bopper, the saxophonist of the Snazzy Catz Jazz Club, loses his false teeth during a particularly impassioned scat, he loses his bop at the same time. Riding atop a beehive 'do to the ladies' room, they are mistakenly flushed, and with that calamity, the blues descends on Cool Bopper. High's exuberant text grooves on the musical possibilities of jazz, stringing together consonants and internal rhymes in a mellifluous celebration of sound: "Poor Cool Bopper / toted / his saxophone- / his golden bold / baritone saxophone" O'Brien's ink-and-watercolor illustrations pulse with energy, blending the curves of musical instruments into the architecture itself in a visual countermelody (an especially inspired cross-section of plumbing reveals a sewage system designed like a French horn). The resolution is sweetly satisfying: A morose Cool Bopper seeks solace by the seashore and finds his teeth blowing on a shell; a grin wider than the Hudson reveals that the bop is back. Not the weightiest tale on the shelves, but still good silly, be-boppin' fun. (Picture book. 3-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590783795
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
01/28/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.22(w) x 10.22(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
7 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Linda Oatman High is the author of number of picture books for Boyds Mills Press, including The Last Chimney of Christmas Eve, Beekepers, and Winter Shoes for Shadow Horse. She lives in Narvon, Pennsylvania.

John O'Brien has illustrated more than thirty books for children. Among his titles for Boyds Mills Press are I Know a Shy Fellow Who Swallowed a Cello by Barbara Garriel, The Twelve Days of Christmas, and The Farmer in the Dell. He lives in Delran, New Jersey.

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