Copic Coloring Guide Level 2: Nature

Copic Coloring Guide Level 2: Nature

5.0 1
by Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Containing informative and educational material for using the popular Copic markers, this guide presents card designs and instructions in an easy-to-follow format filled with tips for expanding coloring skills. The sample projects provide examples of the most current and popular card-making techniques used by paper crafters today. Ideal for card makers,…  See more details below

Overview

Containing informative and educational material for using the popular Copic markers, this guide presents card designs and instructions in an easy-to-follow format filled with tips for expanding coloring skills. The sample projects provide examples of the most current and popular card-making techniques used by paper crafters today. Ideal for card makers, coloring artists, and drawing enthusiasts, this book features advice from a Copic certified instructor on advanced blending techniques, working with digital images, and how to follow the Copic numbering system. A CD of images to color is included in the package.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596354098
Publisher:
Annie's
Publication date:
04/01/2012
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
262,032
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.20(d)

Read an Excerpt

Copic Coloring Guide

Level 2: Nature


By Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen

Annie's

Copyright © 2012 Annie's
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-59635-521-7



CHAPTER 1

Alternative Blending & Shading Groups


There are a number of ways to color images. In the Copic® Coloring Guide, we covered how to read the Copic numbering system and how to select good blending groups based on some basic rules. In the following section, we show how to break those rules and give some guidelines for picking alternative blending and shading groups.


Blending Beyond the Code

When beginning with Copic markers, you are taught to pick blending groups with the same letter (color family), same first number (saturation), and two or three digits difference in the last number (shade/value). Here is an example of an image colored following those basic rules. The following markers were used: B000, B00, B02, B04, BV000, BV00, BV02, BV04, R46.

While this is good, images can be made even more realistic by changing the saturation as well as the shade. By going one or two steps less saturated with each marker, you can create more believable contrast and shading.


Some basic things to know about shadows and shading

Shadows are not only darker in shade, but also less saturated. This means they are not as vibrant and typically have more gray in them.

• Shadows are often cooler in tone.

• Objects in the foreground are more vibrant than objects in the background.


The 10+2 Rule

B00 + 10 = B10 + 2 = B12 + 10 = B22 + 2 B24


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Tropical fish digital stamp

Markers: B000, B00, B12, B24, BV00, BV11, BV23, R46

Computer with printer


Here is an example of the 10+2 Rule:

B00 is the base color.

Step 1: Pick a beginning color. This should be a light shade in the color family you want to work with. For example, the fish is based in B00 and B000 is worked in as the light color.

B00 + 10 + 2 = B12

Step 2: Pick a medium shade marker in the same color family but with one digit less saturation. By adding 10 + 2 to the beginning marker number, you will find a usable blend. In the example, B12 is feathered into the fish

Remember — the first digit goes UP as the saturation goes DOWN.

Step 3: Following the same general rule, pick a darker shade, again with one or two digits less saturation. For example, B24 is added as final shading on fish.

This will give your shading more depth and a realistic appeal.

B12 + 10 + 2 = B24

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.

Remember, the 10+2 Rule is a guideline and can be tweaked to work for you.


Blending Outside the Color Family

To take your coloring even further, you can completely leave the rules behind and move outside the color family for blends. This allows you to create beautiful undertones and interesting color combinations.

When picking colors, forget the numbers. Shades from various color families are not always going to be similar. Don't trust that R46 is going to be a lighter shade than YR09.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Tropical fish digital stamp

Markers: R46, Y11, Y15, YR15, YR18

Computer with printer

Always test your color combinations on scratch paper and add your favorites to your sketchbook.


Here is an example of Blending Outside the Color Family:

Step 1: Base the entire image in a light color to create an undertone. The example uses Y11.

Step 2: Feather in a darker shade of the same color. The example uses Y15.

Step 3: Add a similar shade in a different color family. The example uses YR15.

Step 4: Feather in a darker shade of the same color. The example uses YR18.

Step 5: Jump to a different color family and add the darkest shade to some areas. The example uses R46 on fins and tail.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Here are a few tips to keep in mind

Colors next to each other on the color wheel are much easier to blend and look more natural together.

• While colors don't need to be the same saturation, try to keep them similar (within 3–4 digits) for a more cohesive look.


Shadow & Shading Options

Sometimes there isn't a color dark enough or desaturated enough to give eye-popping contrast in the shadows. In this situation, there are two options and the following example shows both styles.


Complementary Color Shadow & Shading

One of the "rules" for shadows is that they are less saturated, which often means that they are grayer. When two complementary colors are mixed together (red/green, blue/orange, yellow/purple), they create gray. Adding a complementary color is a perfect way to create dark shaded areas and crisp cast shadows.


Gray Shadow & Shading

Adding a touch of gray is another simple way to create those deep shadows. Remember that shadows are typically cooler, so you probably want to pull from the Cool Gray markers for this. It takes a bit of practice to find just the right shade of gray to use; too light and it will lighten your image and too dark will look unnatural. My favorite shading gray is C3, but make sure to test your own color combinations and keep them in your sketchbook.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Giraffe digital stamp

Markers: BV02, C3, E33, E50, E51, Y21, YR14, YR24, W1, W3, W5

Computer with printer


Step 1: Base entire image with E50. Feather E51 onto image for light shading.

Step 2: Add darker shading to giraffe with E33 and blend.

Notice that the basic blending and shading is completed with normal color combinations, and the complementary color, or gray, is only added as a final touch.

Step 3: Color spots with YR21, YR24 and YR14. Color hooves with W1, W3 and W5.

Step 4: Add touches of BV02 (a complementary color) to areas that would be darkest and as cast shadows.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


On the traditional 12-step color wheel, blue-violet is a complement or opposite of yellow-red.

CHAPTER 2

How to Color ...


One of the most common questions we get as instructors is, "How do I color (fill in the blank)?" While there are no hard-and-fast rules to coloring specific objects, there are some general guidelines to follow. In this section, we cover some of the most common topics we get asked about.


White

Some people leave white objects uncolored. While this is generally OK, it's not the most effective way to color white. Unlike black, you actually use different colors to represent white.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Sweet Sheep digital stamp

Markers: E30, E70, G05, G24, G40, RV66, RV91, W3, Y28, YR08, YR20

Colorless Blender (0)

Computer with printer


Tips and Tricks

Highlights in white objects often reflect the color of the light source.

• Shadows on white objects often reflect the color of the surface the object is resting on.

• Smooth and man-made objects often have cool colors for shading.

• Be careful with grays as shading for white. Grays have a tendency to make an object appear dirty or unnatural.

• You can set off a white object by coloring the background.


Step 1: Decide whether your white object will have warm or cool shading and what color any highlights will be.

Step 2: Base the shadows only with the lightest color (E30). Go further into the white area than the finished shading will actually be.

Step 3: Add more shadows with a darker tone (Y28).

Step 4: Blend using either the lighter shade or another light shade in a different tone. Y20 was used here to create a nice golden tone.

Step 5: Add a touch of complementary color to more heavily shaded areas (RV91 and E70).

Step 6: Using a juicy Colorless Blender and small circles, push the color back into the shadows.


Natural textures or living objects often have warm colors for shading.

Step 7: Add cast shadows and subtle highlights with W3.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Colorless Blender from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Black

Black is never just black. Not only are there many shades of black, there are also different tones. Black can be either warm or cool. If black is warm, it has brown undertones, and if it is cool, it typically has blue undertones. Copic grays are wonderful for coloring black. Use W grays or T grays for warm blacks and C grays for cool blacks. Of course, if you don't want either tone, remain neutral with the N grays.

Keep in mind that black is a color like any other, and you will want a variety of values to create highlights and shadows.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Little Black Bug digital stamp

Markers: C1, C3, C5, C7, C9

Computer with printer


Leave your highlights white or add them in with Opaque White pigment paint.

Step 1: Pick three to five grays in the same tones. Typically, every other shade is sufficient. This sample is colored using cool grays.

Step 2: Base the image with a light gray (C3). Leave the highlighted area uncolored.

Step 3: Add shading with a medium gray (C5) and blend.

Step 4: Add more shading with a dark gray (C7) and blend.

Step 5: Add a touch of C9 to the deepest shaded areas.

Step 6: Blend highlight out gently with a light shade of gray (C1).

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Tips and Tricks

Add cast shadows with a very dark blue (B39, B99) or dark brown (E79).

• Shiny or reflective surfaces (like patent leather) will have LOTS of contrast.

• Be careful when using the Colorless Blender. It can intensify the brown or blue tone in the color.


Foliage

Forget smooth coloring and soft blends. When coloring foliage it's important to identify details and create texture.

The techniques for adding this texture are dotting and/or scribbling.

Tips and Tricks

Do NOT blend the scribbles or dots.

• Vary the size of the dots for more interest.


Instead of creating scribbles, try adding each color by dotting with the tip of the brush nib.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Old Oak digital stamp

Markers: E13, E17, E30, G29, G82, G85, YG21, YG23, YG25

Computer with printer


Step 1: Identify the basic shape of the foliage. Is the tree or plant a circle, cylinder, cone, sphere or a combination of shapes? This tree is made up of a number of spheres.

Let each color dry completely before adding more layers.

Step 2: Color each individual shape as normal with a basic blending group. This will become your undertone (YG21, YG23, YG25).

Step 3: Pick two to three markers that are darker and/or less saturated than the base colors. No need to follow rules for blending groups here (G82, G85, G29).

Keep your wrist and fingers loose to create carefree scribbles.

Step 4: Using the lightest shade, make loose scribbles over the entire surface.

Step 5: Using the medium shade, make loose scribbles to add slight shading.

Do not cover all of the lightest color, even in the shaded areas.

Step 6: Using the darkest shade, make loose scribbles to add shadows.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Coloring Rocks

Rocks, pebbles and stones come in all shapes and sizes, and there are many different ways to color them. Here is a basic tutorial to get you started.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Solid as a Rock digital stamp

Markers: N1, N3, N5, R22, YG63, YG67

Computer with printer


Step 1: Color smaller parts of the image that might be in the foreground or in front of the rocks.

Step 2: Base the rocks with a light neutral color (N1).

Step 3: While the base coat is still wet, feather in a darker shade from the bottom by flicking toward the light source (N3).

Step 4: Using a darker shade (N5), feather more color toward the light source in an irregular pattern.

Step 5: Blend only slightly, leaving irregularities, lumps and bumps.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card and markers from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Tips and Tricks

Add dots of varying sizes and colors to the rock shadows to add texture.

• Lightly dab the rock with the Colorless Blender to create a mottled appearance.


Ground

It is important to "ground" your images (giving them something to sit or stand on) otherwise they look as if they are floating in mid-air. Here is just one way to create ground for your image. Play around with this technique and adapt it to fit your image and style.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Solid as a Rock digital stamp

Markers: BG11, BG93, E42, E43, N1, N3, N5, R22, YG63, YG67

Colorless Blender (0)

Computer with printer


Step 1: Color your image as normal.

Step 2: Pick colors that represent the type of ground the image is on and possibly some colors from the image itself.

Step 3: Feather two colors out from the base of the image. This can be done roughly and blending isn't necessary (N3, E42).

Step 4: With a juicy Colorless Blender, start in the white area and push the color back toward the image. Do not over blend; remove the streaks from the edges only.

Step 5: Let the ground dry completely. Add irregular-sized dots of two or three coordinating colors (E43, N3, BG93).

Step 6: Let dry completely. Add dots with the Colorless Blender.

Step 7: Add darker cast shadows near the bottom of the image and add a background if wanted.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Colorless Blender from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Fur

Loveable, huggable, fuzzy little friends deserve special treatment! While you can use the scribbling or dotting technique to create the look of fur, here are two more techniques to create that fuzzy fleece.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Masking material (optional)

Koala Hugs digital stamp

Markers: E17, E21, E34, E47, G24, G28, N0, N2, N4, N6, YG21

Colorless Blender (0)

Sponge

Computer with printer


Sponging

Sponging creates darker fur than other techniques.

Mask off any area you don't want inked.

Step 1: Color the fur as normal (N0, N2, N4). Create mask for tree and mask tree if needed.

Step 2: Scribble ink onto a sponge or piece of cloth (N6).

Use a variety of shades when sponging for maximum contrast.

Step 3: Quickly dab the sponge onto colored image using lighter shades as you move toward the highlights.

Step 4: Repeat steps 2 and 3 as necessary.

Step 5: Remove masks and color the rest of the image as normal.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Colorless Blender from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


Colorless Blender Fur

Using a Colorless Blender creates lighter fur than other techniques.

Step 1: Color the fur as normal. This needs to be done first (N0, N2, N4).

Step 2: Dampen a cloth with Colorless Blender refill.

Do not over soak the cloth or the texture will be muddled.

Step 3: Place dampened cloth over colored image and hold for a few seconds. Do not press or squeeze.

Step 4: Remove cloth to reveal texture.

Step 5: Color the rest of the image as normal.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Colorless Blender refill from Imagination International Inc.; digital stamp by Marianne Walker.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Copic Coloring Guide by Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen. Copyright © 2012 Annie's. Excerpted by permission of Annie's.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More

Meet the Author

Colleen Schaan is a regional Copic certification instructor and team member of the Fine Art Education program for the southeast coast. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Marianne Walker is the product director for Imagination International, Inc., where she develops product publications and certification manuals. She lives in Springfield, Oregon. They are the coauthors of Copic Coloring Guide.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Copic Coloring Guide Level 2: Nature 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
vicksand More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed the second installment of Copic Coloring Guide. A great addition to Copic Coloring Guide Level 1. Thanks Marianne and Collen for writing Level 2 and the CD is a great bonus, wish one had been included with your first book too.