Copic Coloring Guide Level 4: Fine Details

Copic Coloring Guide Level 4: Fine Details

by Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker
     
 

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The important finishing details that will complete an image and give it a polished, professional look are highlighted in this fourth installment of the Copic Coloring Guide series. The crafting handbook discusses light source in-depth, from highlights to shadows and shading, and provides step-by-step tutorials for adding details with the Multiliner pen and creating

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Overview

The important finishing details that will complete an image and give it a polished, professional look are highlighted in this fourth installment of the Copic Coloring Guide series. The crafting handbook discusses light source in-depth, from highlights to shadows and shading, and provides step-by-step tutorials for adding details with the Multiliner pen and creating backgrounds with the Airbrush System. It also teaches techniques for no-line stamping, faux watercoloring, and using Copics with other coloring mediums. A final tutorial section pulls all of the learned skills together with helpful tips and suggestions that include coloring detailed images, keeping coloring consistent throughout an image, and marker control. All of the hand-drawn images from the book are included on the accompanying CD-ROM, and the images from the tutorials can be printed so crafters can apply the lessons from the book to the image before them, in addition to extra sample projects from artists to further inspire and instruct crafters.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596355750
Publisher:
Annie's
Publication date:
09/01/2013
Series:
Copic Coloring Guide
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
250,796
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.30(d)

Read an Excerpt

Copic Coloring Guide

Level 4: Fine Details


By Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen

Annie's

Copyright © 2013 Annie's
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-59635-576-7



CHAPTER 1

Let There Be Light


In this final book of the Copic Coloring Guide series, we want to take you to the artist level, thinking about and coloring images in a realistic and true to nature way. To do this, we need to tackle the topic of light. Talking about light source and creating highlights and shadows can be daunting, so we want to start with some basic terminology. Often, using and understanding the same language can break down barriers of frustration and uncertainty.


Basic Terminology

While there are many more terms than what we will cover here and much more detailed descriptions of these terms, we want to keep this section simple and present just the basic, essential information. The definitions here should be enough to make you comfortable tackling the coloring of any of your stamped or digital images.

Light Source: The direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement directs the eye and will affect every aspect of the image. The light source visually tells where to add light values and dark values.

Value: Different shades of gray from white to black.

Shading: Gradient blending from light value to dark value.

Highlight: The area(s) where light hits the object first and fullest. Illustrated by the very lightest value.

Mid-Tone: The area(s) not in direct light or direct shadow.

Form Shadow: The area(s) on an object that receive little to no light. Often called core shadow.

Cast Shadow: The area(s) on the adjacent surface where the light is blocked by the object. Cast shadows also vary in tone and value.

Contrast: The difference between light and dark values.

Low Contrast: An image having only light and middle values. The image will tend to look soft and flat.

High Contrast: An image having a variation of light to dark values. The image will look more visually appealing and 3-D.


Checking Images for Contrast

Here are some ways to check an image for contrast:


Squint

By squinting, the details lose focus and the value becomes more visible.


Hold Image at Arm's Length

By holding the image further away, the details lose focus and the value becomes more visible.


Hold Image Upside Down or in a Mirror

The image itself loses shape and the value becomes more visible.


Turn Image to Black & White

The color is removed and the value becomes the main focus.


The Importance of Value

Value visually defines an object and gives it depth and dimension. Without a variety of light and dark values, an object appears as flat as the paper it is illustrated on.


Here is an activity to help train your eye to see value:

Remove all color and replace it with shades of gray. When an image is colored, we tend to focus on the hue instead of the value. By removing the color and using different shades of gray, we can see the value without the distraction of color. This is called a grayscale or a value study.

Now let's look at the same apple image with all color removed.

It's even more helpful to go one step further and create a modified grayscale to show value.

We will be using this type of value study throughout the remainder of the book. We strongly suggest that you begin playing with images and creating your own value studies for them.


Light Source

We hope this next section gives you a "light bulb" moment. We can't stress enough the importance of light in your images. It is vital that you identify your light source and plan the placements of highlights and shadows before you pick up a marker.

Using the same simple apple image, let's take a look at how the light in an image changes with movement of the light source.


First Value Study: Light Directly From Front

In this first value study, the light source is coming from directly in front of the image. Note how the top of the highlight follows the shape of the apple as it curves away from the viewer. Notice too how there is a darker shadow near the stem where the apple curves down into itself. Also observe how the underside of the leaf is brightly lit while the top of the leaf is a mid-tone and shadow.


Second Value Study: Light Directly From Upper-Left

Let's change up the light source and see how it affects the image. Here is a value study with the light coming from the upper-left. Notice how a large portion of the left side of the apple is highlighted and that the shape of the highlight (and shadow) follows the curve of the apple. Study how the leaf blocks the light from hitting the apple and creates a crisp, dark, cast shadow on the top of the apple. Notice that the cast shadow of the apple is the same basic shape of the apple. (More on this later.) Note too how the top of the leaf is fully highlighted and the underside is in shadow.


Third Value Study: Light Directly From Upper-Right

Let's move the light to the other side. This value study has the light coming from the upper-right. Notice how the highlight hits the top of the apple and wraps around the curved shape while the shadow fills in the space around the stem and along the left-hand side of the apple.

So, which is the best light source? Well, that's for you to decide.


The Color of Light

Did you know that light has color? To realistically illustrate light, we need to take the color of the object and the color of the light into consideration.

Most often, we ignore the color of the light and only focus on the color of the object. We illustrate light by coloring the highlights on an object a very light shade of the mid-tone color or the color of the object itself as is demonstrated by the light purple highlights on this zinnia.

In reality, the color of the light source affects the color of the highlights on an object. Here is that same zinnia image colored with a slight yellow hue added to the highlight as if the container were sitting outside in the sun.


Shadows

Me & My Shadow

While light plays the leading role, the award for best supporting actor has to go to the shadow. Whether form shadows or cast shadows, shadows help give depth and dimension to an object.

Let's begin with an image without any variations in value. Notice how flat and boring the image is. It's dull and without any real character or distinction because it has no highlights or shadows.

Here is the same image in modified grayscales showing two different light sources. The first shows a light source from the upper-left.

The second shows a light source from the upper-right. Notice that the images have both form shadows and cast shadows.


Form & Cast Shadows

Here we have the finished image with shading and form shadows added. Notice the crisp shading on the apple and the bright highlight. This implies the surface is smooth and very shiny. Observe the softer shadow on the belt holding the books together. This confirms the belt is a soft leather and isn't reflective at all. The books have a slight highlight at the top and shadow on the bottom, because the light source is coming from the upper-right.

Let's take the image one step further by adding cast shadows.

Notice the shadow that the apple casts across the book cover. Look closely to see the shadow cast on the side of the pages by the bookmark and the belt, and notice the shadow cast on the surface the books rest on by the end of the belt and the books themselves.


Shading With Undertones

Most of the time, shadows are added at the end of the coloring process. While there is nothing wrong with this, there is another technique that can be used to create interesting depth and color tone. One of the techniques painters often use is underpainting, or blocking in highlights and shadows at the beginning of the painting process. This process is similar to creating a value study. Because Copic marker ink is translucent, we can take advantage of this same technique to help build glowing highlights and rich shadows. Follow this step-by-step tutorial for underpainting an image:

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Apple Blossom digital image

Markers: B41, R24, R81, V95, Y11, YG03, YG17, YR14

Colorless Blender (0)

Computer with printer


Step 1: Choose a light source. Add light yellow (Y11) or orange-yellow to areas having the brightest highlights. Flick toward the mid tone for easier blending.

Step 2: Add a mid-shade gray or a de-saturated blue, green or violet (V95) to the areas that will be in shadow.

Step 3: Base leaves with YG03. Add shading with YG17 and blend gently.

Step 4: Add R81 to flower petals and fade to white with Colorless Blender at edges.

Step 5: Leaving the yellow highlight visible, add YR14 and R24 to the apple and blend gently.

Step 6: Add sky with B41 and fade to white with Colorless Blender.

Remember that shading is the gradient blend from light to dark, and shadows are any dark areas in an image and are either form shadows or cast shadows.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Colorless Blender from Imagination International Inc.; digital image by Marianne Walker.


Highlights, Textures & Surfaces

Besides giving us clues as to the setting and light source type, highlights can also tell us a lot about the surface and the texture of an object. Soft surfaces that absorb the light tend to have soft highlights and shadows and have a smooth gradient blend between the two. Hard, smooth surfaces that reflect light will have crisp highlights and shadows and hard lines with little-to-no blending between the two.


Soft Textures

Notice the soft blends between the highlights and the shadows on the clothing of the couple in this image. The viewer knows the clothing is a soft fabric (like cotton) and not stiff or shiny (like leather) because of the smooth blending and soft highlights.


Hard Textures & Reflective Surfaces

On the other hand, we know the scooter is made from metal or hard plastic and will have a smooth, reflective surface. It's important to know how to create highlights to illustrate this.

The most common way to show a highly reflective surface is to leave the highlight white. This will create the most visible contrast.

Follow this step-by-step tutorial to create reflective highlights:


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Vespa digital image

Markers: B91, B95, B99, C3, C4, E000, E11, R29, R42, R59, Y00, Y21

Opaque White pigment

Paintbrush

Computer with printer


Step 1: Study the partially colored image and orient yourself with the current light source. Here, the light is coming from the upper-left.

Step 2: Decide where the highlights are going to be on the scooter and outline them with a mid-tone color.

Step 3: Fill in the rest of the scooter with the mid-tone color. Make sure to avoid the white highlight areas.

Step 4: Add dark values to the shadow area and blend toward the highlight. Make sure to leave the highlight white with sharp edges.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Opaque White pigment from Imagination International Inc.; digital image by Marianne Walker.

CHAPTER 2

Mixing It Up!


By this point in the series, all of the basics have been covered — color choice, blending, lighting. But don't think we're going to stop there. In this chapter, we will share tips and tutorials on how to get unique and interesting looks beyond your basic Copic coloring. Step up your images by adding details with Multiliners, creating engaging backgrounds, mixing coloring mediums, using light outlines, and producing painterly effects with watercoloring.


Mixing Custom Colors

This technique is used for making lighter versions of your favorite hues. When creating custom colors, make sure to keep track of the amounts of ink and Colorless Blender solution added for future reference.


Materials

White smooth cardstock scrap

Ink refill in desired color

Colorless Blender refill (0)

Empty marker

Empty Various Ink bottle

Cotton swab


Step 1: Take the cap and pouring tip off of an empty Various Ink bottle.

Step 2: Add five cc's of Colorless Blender solution.

Step 3: Add two-three drops of desired color. Keep track of the amounts added.

Step 4: Mix gently.

Step 5: Test the color on cardstock using a cotton swab dipped into the new color.

Step 6: Add two–three more drops of ink to darken or one–two cc's of Colorless Blender solution to lighten. Keep track of the amounts added.

Step 7: Continue adding ink or Colorless Blender solution in the above increments until desired color is achieved.

Step 8: Fill the remaining bottle with the same ratio of Colorless Blender solution to drops of ink. Label it as a custom color as desired.

Step 9: Fill an empty marker with custom color and label it as a custom color as desired.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, ink refill, Colorless Blender refill, empty marker and empty Various Ink bottle from Imagination International Inc.


Enhancing With Multiliners

Did you know that you could enhance an image by adding a few simple lines, dots or shapes? It's fun and easy and can really change the way your artwork looks.


Adding Patterns

Take a simple image and step it up by adding a few simple lines.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Heart digital image

Markers: B12, B28, B52, B97, BG11, BG23, BG49, BV11, BV13, BV17, R81, R83, R85, R89

Colorless Blender (0)

Black Multiliners: .05mm, .1mm, .3mm, .5mm, .7mm

Computer with printer


Step 1: Print a basic shape onto cardstock.

Step 2: Pencil in various patterns and lines to create a patchwork-like look. Don't be worried about perfection. Use a variety of straight lines and curved lines mixed with interesting shapes and patterns.

Step 3: Trace over the pencil lines with a Multiliner.

Step 4: Vary the line width by using a number of different size Multiliners for a more interesting look.

Step 5: Let the ink dry completely; erase any stray pencil lines and add color with Copic markers.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers, Colorless Blender and Multiliners from Imagination International Inc.; digital image by Colleen Schaan.


Adding Shading & Texture

Create subtle shading and texture by adding hatch marks and stippling to an image.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Feather digital image

Markers: B41, C1, C3, C5, E42, E44

Black (.05mm) Multiliner

Computer with printer


Step 1: Print image onto cardstock.

Step 2: Decide where highlights and shadows will be placed. Create a value study if necessary.

Step 3: Add slight shading to the image by adding hatch marks, crosshatching or stippling to the image with a Multiliner.

Step 4: Let ink dry and color as normal.

Sources: White smooth X-Press It Blending Card, markers and Multiliners from Imagination International Inc.; digital image by Marianne Walker.


Creating Backgrounds

Have you ever noticed how some images just seem to stand out or look more "finished" than others? Often this is because they are given a "setting" to rest in and become part of a scene. No matter your drawing or coloring skills, it's easy to create a simple setting for your stamped images with a variety of Copic tools and products.


Materials

White smooth cardstock

Scrap paper

Bride digital image

Markers: B34, BV17, C00, C1, C3, C5, C7, C9, E00, E04, E08, E21, E23, E53, E97, G17, V04, YG13, YR21

Airbrush system

Repositionable tape

Computer with printer


Creating a Background With the Airbrush

Use the airbrush system to cover larger areas and create special effects in your backgrounds.

Step 1: Print image onto cardstock.

Step 2: Print image onto scratch paper and cut out.

Step 3: Using cut image as a mask, attach it to the main image with repositionable tape.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Copic Coloring Guide by Colleen Schaan, Marianne Walker, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen. Copyright © 2013 Annie's. Excerpted by permission of Annie's.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Colleen Schaan is a regional Copic certification instructor and team member of the Fine Art Education program for the southeast coast. She is the author of numerous Copic technique articles for CardMaker magazine. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Marianne Walker is the product director for Imagination International, Inc., where she develops product publications and certification manuals. She is the author of A Beginner’s Guide to Lighting and Shadows & Shading. She lives in Springfield, Oregon. They are the coauthors of Copic Coloring Guide, Copic Coloring Guide Level 2: Nature, and Copic Coloring Guide Level 3: People.

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