Coping with Physical Loss and Disability: A Workbook

Coping with Physical Loss and Disability: A Workbook

by Rick Ritter
     
 

This workbook provides more than 50 questions and exercises designed to empower those with physical loss and disability to better understand and accept their ongoing processes of loss and recovery. The exercises in Coping with Physical Loss and Disability were distilled from ten years of clinical social work experience with clients suffering from quadriplegia,…  See more details below

Overview

This workbook provides more than 50 questions and exercises designed to empower those with physical loss and disability to better understand and accept their ongoing processes of loss and recovery. The exercises in Coping with Physical Loss and Disability were distilled from ten years of clinical social work experience with clients suffering from quadriplegia, paraplegia, amputation, cancer, severe burns, HIV/AIDs, and neuro-muscular disorders arising from accidents, injury, and disease.

"Rick Ritter captures the depth of the emotional pain in the aftermath of physical loss and disability." -- Rev. James W. Clifton, Ph.D., LCSW

"The examples given by the author are very relevant and will help the sufferer relate to similar situations." -- S.V. Swamy, Holistic Healer and editor of Homeopathy For Everyone

It helped me identify feelings I was unaware of, like anger, and I put on paper how lonely i am. -- J.B., a reader who has used this book to change her life.

This workbook is a very good stimulus for focusing on issues crucial for better coping with loss and disability. -- Beni R. Jakob, Ph.D, Israeli Arthritis Foundation (INBAR)

Series Info
Coping with Physical Loss and Disability: A Workbook is the second book in the New Horizons in Therapy Series. This series is specifically designed to empower clients to work on their own in a therapeutic setting. As many therapists will state, it's often what the client does outside the session that can make the biggest difference in recovery.

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Editorial Reviews

Rebecca's Reads - Rebecca Brown
Rebeccasreads highly recommends COPING WITH PHYSICAL LOSS AND DISABILITY as a much-needed primer in this time of War against Global Terrorism, as more & more of our beloved Warriors return home from the battlefields injured & maimed.

It behooves us, one & all, to learn what physical loss means to them & their families. COPING WITH PHYSICAL LOSS AND DISABILITY, with quotations from world famous people who live with life-altering losses & diseases, is an easily read workbook with stories,
Rich - Bob Rich
When your body no longer works the way it is supposed to, you lose far more than physical function. While some people can focus on what they have left and get on with life, for most of us physical loss involves grieving, changes in how we value ourselves, even disgust and shame.

This is why Rick Ritter's workbook will be invaluable for anyone who has been damaged in any of a very wide range of ways: surgery, accident, violence, disease, even aging itself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013168039
Publisher:
Loving Healing Press
Publication date:
08/06/2011
Series:
New Horizons in Therapy , #1
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
104
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Until I was in the Marine Corps (in 1969) and injured my knee on the obstacle course at Officer Candidate School (OCS) as an enlisted man, I had never had any particular injuries. I had never needed corrective surgery for anything except appendix and tonsils in my short lifetime. However, being operated on in a military hospital and then recuperating as a resident in a 55-bed ward with primarily medevac cases directly returning from Viet Nam was a bit of an adjustment. I was an inpatient there for
about 5 months and was operated on several times. I also did my primary rehab there. Even though I didn’t recognize it at the time, this period turned out to be the biggest turning point in my life. That first injury and series of operations led to 13 knee operations and subsequent rehabs, mostly on one leg, but eventually the other knee had to be operated on as well in 1991.

Due to the damage and pain levels that existed with the first knee, it was finally fused in 1977 and surgically stiff for 20 years. This helped in some ways and created problems in others. Eventually, this led in 1997 to surgically unfusing the joint and implanting a prosthetic knee. I worked on rehab for a year and a half, three times a week to get it to function reasonably well and in a stable condition. There have been other affiliated problems with the leg, such as permanent nerve damage caused by medical negligence
at one point, circulation problems and the periodic breakdown of the skin in areas affected by poorer circulation.

Overall, it was one of the best things that has ever happened to me, since it kept me from being shipped out to Viet Nam (I was issued six different sets of orders). Eventually, of course, it led me to the helping professions and making a difference in the lives of those suffering with the effects of physical and mental trauma. It has allowed me to meet people all over the world who have become special friends. In
the end this has encouraged me even more—for example, if I am having a tough day, I think back to the triple-amputee Mongolian fireman I met who outrode even able-bodied riders each and every day. He did this for several weeks over hundreds of miles and I never saw a frown or a scowl on his face.

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