Copyright Exceptions: The Digital Impact

Copyright Exceptions: The Digital Impact

by Robert Burrell, Allison Coleman
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0521123445

ISBN-13: 9780521123440

Pub. Date: 11/19/2009

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This book was first published in 2005. Copyright 'exceptions' or 'users' rights' have become a highly controversial aspect of copyright law. Most recently, Member States of the European Union have been forced to amend their systems of exceptions so as to comply with the Information Society Directive. Taking the newly amended UK legislation as a case study, this

Overview

This book was first published in 2005. Copyright 'exceptions' or 'users' rights' have become a highly controversial aspect of copyright law. Most recently, Member States of the European Union have been forced to amend their systems of exceptions so as to comply with the Information Society Directive. Taking the newly amended UK legislation as a case study, this book examines why copyright exceptions are necessary and the forces that have shaped the present legislative regime in the UK. It seeks to further our understanding of the exceptions by combining detailed doctrinal analysis with insights gained from a range of other sources. The principal argument of the book is that the UK's current system of 'permitted acts' is much too restrictive and hence is in urgent need of reform, but that paradoxically the Information Society Directive points the way towards a much more satisfactory approach.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521123440
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
11/19/2009
Series:
Cambridge Intellectual Property and Information Law Series, #6
Pages:
460
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Preface     xi
List of abbreviations     xiii
Table of cases     xvii
Table of statutes     xxiii
Introduction     1
The exceptions in focus     1
The functions of the exceptions     4
The plan of this work and our argument in outline     6
A note on language     10
Where we are
Copyright and freedom of expression     15
Recognising the problem     16
The idea/expression dichotomy and judicial reaction     20
Recognising the conflict     24
Resolving the conflict     35
Conclusion     41
Fair dealing for the purposes of criticism, review and news reporting and related exceptions     42
Fair dealing for the purposes of criticism, review and the reporting of current events: introduction     43
Does the exception apply to the work in question?     44
Is the use for an approved purpose?     48
Is the use fair?     57
Attribution of the work     60
Summary     61
Miscellaneous provisions relating to the communication of information     62
Miscellaneous provisions relating to the creation of derivative works     64
Other obstaclesfaced by users     67
Conclusion     78
The public interest defence     80
The public interest defence in its early form     81
The recent authorities     91
Can the same result be achieved by other means?     94
The objections of principle to a public interest defence     102
Is a public interest defence legitimate?     103
Is a public interest defence appropriate?     108
Is a public interest defence necessary?     109
Is a public interest defence workable?     111
Conclusion     111
Exceptions applying to education, research and private study     113
Fair dealing for the purposes of research or private study     115
The education exceptions: overview     120
Things done for the purposes of instruction or examination     120
Anthologies for educational use     124
Performing, playing and showing works in educational establishments     124
Lending of copies by educational establishments     126
The licensing provisions     126
Case study: copyright licensing in higher education     130
Conclusion     135
The library and archive provisions and related exceptions      136
Overview of the existing exceptions     137
Defining libraries, archives, museums and galleries and the role of such institutions     138
Divisions within the 1988 Act     142
Wider coverage under the directive     143
The existing library exceptions     145
Miscellaneous exceptions     160
Conclusion     162
How we got here
Markets and metaphors     167
Exceptions, licences and market failure     168
Copyright as a form of property     180
Copyright law and notions of balance     187
Conclusion     191
Copyright in supranational fora     193
The logic of harmonisation     194
The Commission's understanding of copyright I: market failure, the copyright balance and property rights     197
The Commission's understanding of copyright II: harmonisation and the copyright families     201
Opportunities for participation     208
The Information Society Directive and the importance of official inertia     213
Summation     215
The international forum     215
Conclusion     219
Copyright in the domestic arena     220
Understandings of copyright     221
The DTI's mandate     226
Draftsmanship and the inevitable accident     230
Implementing directives: the method of transposition     235
European legislation and the erosion of parliamentary control     236
The role of the judiciary     238
Conclusion     245
Where we go from here
The fair use panacea     249
The evolution of the fair use defence and its abolition by the judiciary     253
Protecting parodies     264
The fair use defence: current practice and future developments     267
Conclusion     274
A model for reform     276
A flexible system     276
A workable system     277
A law of users' rights     279
The importance of public participation     280
Working with the Directive: criticism, review and news reporting     282
Supplementing the Directive: the public interest defence     287
Working with the Directive: private study and research, education, libraries and archives     288
Summation     297
The three-step test     298
Other types of users' rights     299
Making harmonisation a reality     303
Changing attitudes      304
Contractual exclusion and technological measures of protection     306
Conclusion     310
Appendices
Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, Part I, Chapter III: 'Permitted Acts'     313
Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, s. 296ZE and Schedule 5A     352
Directive 2001/29/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 May 2001 on the harmonisation of certain aspects of copyright and related rights in the information society     355
United States Copyright Act 1976, 17 USC, s. 107     375
Bibliography     376
Index     412

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >