Copyright Law And The Distance Education Classroom

Overview

As technology and the idea of distance education is rapidly changing, so too must the law that protects copyrighted material. In 2003 U.S. copyright law was amended with the legislation now known as TEACH (Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization). Tomas Lipinski discusses these changes to copyright law and how they may ultimately affect traditional distance classrooms. Providing a step-by-step explanation of the law and how it impacts these pedagogical issues, Lipinski discusses instructor ownership ...

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Overview

As technology and the idea of distance education is rapidly changing, so too must the law that protects copyrighted material. In 2003 U.S. copyright law was amended with the legislation now known as TEACH (Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization). Tomas Lipinski discusses these changes to copyright law and how they may ultimately affect traditional distance classrooms. Providing a step-by-step explanation of the law and how it impacts these pedagogical issues, Lipinski discusses instructor ownership issues, a general application of "fair use," and other issues that will inevitably arise when technology, intellectual property, and education all intersect. Tomas Lipinski is a lawyer, and he approaches these volatile (and very new) issues from a legal perspective. This book, however, is written in intermediate terms that will make it accessible (as well as necessary) to the distance educator and administrator. As the framework for distance education and technology (particularly copyright) law is now set in place, this book will prove an invaluable resource for years to come.

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Editorial Reviews

American Libraries
Librarians involved in distance education will want to read Tomas A. Lipinski's Copyright Law and the Distance Education Classroom. Lipinski, a lawyer and educator, explains how the 2003 legislation known as the TEACH (Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization) Act amended U.S. copyright law and how it will affect distance education. He discusses instructor ownership issues, fair use, excluded materials, new responsibilities for institutions, and the impact of changing technology as it relates to intellectual property.
Reference and Research Book News
Lipinski (information law and policy, U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) provides distance educators and administrators with a step-by-step explanation of the Technology Education and Copyright Harmonization (TEACH) legislation from 2003, which amended copyright law and provided significant changes in the way educators must act in the distance education environment. By its nature, the material is of an intermediate to advanced level, but the author has written it in as straightforward a style as possible, with the intent that it also be accessible to novice copyright readers. He also provides a "TEACH Q&A" in an appendix and recommended texts in the bibliography for those needing a basic understanding of copyright law concepts.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Tomas A. Lipinski is Co-Director and Associate Professor at the Center for Information Policy Research School of Library and Information Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

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Table of Contents

Part 1 List of Tables Part 2 Foreword Part 3 Part I: Understanding the Limitations on Exclusive Rights for Educators Chapter 4 1 Performance and Display Rights in the Live Classroom and the Remote Classroom: The Need for Reform Part 5 Part II: Understanding the New TEACH Distance Education Law Chapter 6 2 The Scope of the Privilege for Educators: Excluded Materials Chapter 7 3 New Rights and Limitations Regarding Use of Copyrighted Material: Section 110(2) and Subsections (A), (B), and (C) Chapter 8 4 New Responsibilites for the Institution: Section 110(2)(D) Chapter 9 5 Summary of Part II: The Section 110(2) Requirements in a Nutshell Part 10 Part III: Completing the TEACH Puzzle Chapter 11 6 The Ephemeral Recording Privilege in Distance Education: The Old and the New Chapter 12 7 Fair Use of Copyrighted Material in the Distance Education Classroom Part 13 Appendix A: A TEACH Q&A Compliance Audit Part 14 Appendix B: Model Distance Education Copyright Policy Part 15 Appendix C: Copyright Statute Selections (Selected) Part 16 Selected Bibliography Part 17 Case Index Part 18 Subject Index Part 19 About the Author

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