Coraline 10th Anniversary Edition (Enhanced Edition) [NOOK Book]

Coraline 10th Anniversary Edition (Enhanced Edition)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062202796
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/24/2012
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 146,524
  • Age range: 8 years
  • File size: 134 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Neil Gaiman
Novelist Neil Gaiman has sent a British businessman tumbling into a fantastic underworld and had a devil and angel comically conspiring to thwart the Apocalypse. He found his biggest success, though, in Death, Dreams and Destruction -- and the four other similarly named siblings who controlled the reins of the human race's emotional impulses in his graphic-novel series The Sandman, a wholesale rejuvenation of graphic fiction that had everyone from Tori Amos to Norman Mailer spinning with, yes, Delirium.

Biography

Neil Gaiman thought he wrote comic books. But a newspaper editor, of course, set him straight.

Back when he was riding the diabolical headwinds of his popular series of graphic novels, The Sandman, the author attended a party where he introduced himself as a comic-book writer to a newspaper's literary editor. But when the editor quickly realized who this actually was -- and the glaze melted from his eyes -- he offered Gaiman a correction tinged with astonishment: "My God, man, you don't write comics, you write graphic novels." Relating the story to theLos Angeles Times in 1995, Gaiman said, "I suddenly felt like someone who had been informed that she wasn't a hooker, that in fact she was a lady of the evening."

Gaiman's done much more, of course, than simply write graphic novels, having coauthored, with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, a comic novel about the Apocalypse; adapted into hardcover the BBC miniseries Neverwhere about the dark underworld beneath the streets of London; and, inspired by his young daughter, put a horrifying spin on C.S. Lewis' wardrobe doors for Coraline, a children's book about a passageway into a magical, yet malevolent, land.

But it is The Sandman that is Gaiman's magnum opus.

Though he had told a career counselor in high school that he wanted to pen comic books, he had a career as a freelance journalist before his first graphic novel, Violent Cases, was published in England in 1987. DC Comics discovered him and The Sandman was born. Or reborn, actually. The comic debuted back in 1939 with a regular-Joe crime fighter in the lead. But in Gaiman's hands the tale had a more otherworldly spin, slowing introducing readers to the seven siblings Endless: Dream, Death, Desire, Destiny, Destruction, Despair and Delirium (once Delight). They all have their roles in shaping the fates of man. In fact, when Death was imprisoned for decades, the results were devastating. Richard Nixon reached The White House and Michael Jackson the Billboard charts.

Direction from newspaper editors notwithstanding, to Gaiman, these stories are still comic books. The man who shuttled back and forth between comics and classics in his formative years and can pepper his writing with references to Norse mythology as well as the vaudevillian rock group Queen, never cottoned to such highbrow/lowbrow distinctions. Comparing notes on a yachting excursion with members of the Irish rock band U2, the writer who looks like a rock star and Delirium and the rock stars who gave themselves comic-worthy names such as Bono and The Edge came to a realization: Whether the medium is pop music or comic books, not being taken seriously can be a plus. "It's safer to be in the gutter," he told The Washington Post in 1995.

In 1995, Gaiman brought The Sandman to a close and began spending more time on his nongraphic fiction, including a couple of short-story collections. A few years later he released Stardust, an adult fairy tale that has young Tristan Thorn searching for a fallen star to woo the lovely but cold Victoria Forester. In 2001, he placed an ex-con named Shadow in the middle of a war between the ancient and modern dieties in American Gods. Coming in October 2002 is another departure: an audio recording of Two Plays for Voices, which stars Bebe Neuwirth as a wise queen doing battle with a bloodthirsty child and Brian Dennehy as the Angel of Vengeance investigating the first crime in history in heaven's City of Angels.

Gaiman need not worry about defining his artistic relevance, since so many other seem to do it for him. Stephen King, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison are among those who have contributed introductions to his works. William Gibson, the man who coined the term "cyberspace," called him a "a writer of rare perception and endless imagination" as well as "an American treasure." (Even though he's, technically, a British treasure transplanted to the American Midwest.) Even Norman Mailer has weighed in: "Along with all else, Sandman is a comic strip for intellectuals, and I say it's about time."

The gushiest praise, however, may come from Frank McConnell, who barely contained himself in the pages of the political and artistic journal Commonweal. Saying Gaiman "may just be the most gifted and important storyteller in English," McConnell crowned Sandman as the most important act of fiction of the day. "And that, not just because of the brilliance and intricacy of its storytelling -- and I know few stories, outside the best of Joyce, Faulkner, and Pynchon, that are more intricate," he wrote in October 1995, " but also because it tells its wonderful and humanizing tale in a medium, comic books, still largely considered demimonde by the tenured zombies of the academic establishment."

"If Sandman is a 'comic,'" he concluded, "then The Magic Flute is a 'musical' and A Midsummer Night's Dream is a skit. Read the damn thing: it's important."

Good To Know

Some fascinating factoids from our interview with Gaiman:

"One of the most enjoyable bits of writing Sandman was getting authors whose work I love to write the introductions for the collected graphic novels -- people like Steve Erickson, Gene Wolfe, Harlan Ellison, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, Mikal Gilmore, and Samuel R. Delany."

"I have a big old Addams Family house, with -- in the summertime -- a vegetable garden, and I love growing exotic pumpkins. As a boy in England I used to dream about Ray Bradbury Hallowe'ens, and am thrilled that I get them these days. Unless I'm on the road signing people's books, of course."

"According to my daughters, my most irritating habit is asking for cups of tea."

"I love radio -- and love the availability of things like the Jack Benny radio shows in MP3 format. I'm addicted to BBC radio 7, and keep buying boxed CD sets of old UK radio programs, things like Round the Horne and Hancock's Half Hour. Every now and again I'll write a radio play."

"I love thunderstorms, old houses, and dreams."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Minneapolis, Minnesota
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 10, 1960
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portchester, England
    1. Education:
      Attended Ardingly College Junior School, 1970-74, and Whitgift School, 1974-77
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 764 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(444)

4 Star

(215)

3 Star

(70)

2 Star

(18)

1 Star

(17)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 765 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A lovely book

    This lovely book has been through check-in many times at the library, and every time,one of my coworkers--a real Neil Gaiman fan--would tell me to read it. I'm so glad I finally did.

    Coraline and her family move to a new flat that is part of a larger house, which is appropriately big and creepy. While exploring her new home, Coraline discovers a large door in the drawing room. Her mother unlocks it (with an appropriately large, old looking black key, of course) to reveal a brick wall. When Coraline opens the door by herself, though, the brick wall is gone! She goes through a strange corridor and finds a flat exactly like hers, complete with copies of her neighbors and her "other" parents--all with shiny black buttons for eyes (I still don't understand the buttons, but they are rather creepy). Soon, Coraline realizes that her other mother is up to no good.

    One of the best things about Coraline is that it's funny. Coraline tells it like it is. My favorite deadpan of hers occurs in a conversation with her neighbors, the delightfully named Misses Spink and Forcible:

    "How are your dear mother and father?" asked Miss Spink.

    "Missing," said Coraline. "I haven't seen either of them since yesterday. I'm on my own. I think I've probably become a single child family."

    Ha! That still gets me. I thoroughly enjoyed Coraline's talkative feline ally, as well.

    In the end, though, Coraline is more than just scary and funny at twists and turns. The quote at the beginning of the book--

    Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten. --G.K. Chesterton

    --fits Coraline's story very well.

    This book was written for children, but I believe that people of any age group can enjoy it. I know I did!

    70 out of 83 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2008

    Quirky, a little bizarre, fascinating!

    This is an excellent book for younger but mature readers (4th through 7th grade), but it could be somewhat scary for anyone younger. It's fast paced, very Tim-Burtonish, a really quick read. I couldn't put it down!

    45 out of 54 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Reccomended

    Coraline is probably the scariest, freakiest, most original book ever! This book is about a girl named Coraline who moves into a new house and discovers a door...

    My favorite part was when the hand was running around the house - that was scary!
    I recommend this book for ages 8 and up and for people who like scary stories and have some imagination :)

    Want to find out more about the book? Read it and you won't be sorry! :)

    35 out of 45 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Coraline

    This book keeps u on the edge of ur seat!!! I love books like this, and im guessing its hard for u not to like books like this either! And once u have read the book, WATCH THE MOVIE!!!!!!! Its just as good as the book!

    22 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Just relax and open a brand new world!!!

    Coraline is about a girl who finds another world. When she finds the other world she finds another mother and another father but just when she thinks this is great, a little problem comes along. My connection to this book is that Coraline has another mother and so do I. I recommend this book to people who like nerve raking stories. This is a fantastic book and I give it 4 thumbs up!!!

    19 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Always loved this book.

    This is a great book! Great for all ages and it will capture your heart. (: i dont have to bring coraline in my bag no longer, i'll have my nook!! I Hope everyone enjoyed this as much as i. (':

    14 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Really good

    This book is really great but the movie was super scary!!!!

    12 out of 23 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2012

    True hearted

    I have seen the movie and it was one of my top ten movies . When i found out there was a book i started freaking out and got my hands on it the first chance i got . Being 16 and reading the reviews , i was expecting a short easy read ... thats exactly what i got . But this easy read took me to another world and i found a few parts scary ( im not one for anything remotely scary) but all in all , i would highly recomend .

    12 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2012

    Coraline

    Coraline sends chills down your spine with every word. From the "other" mother to the lost souls of stolen children, you might want to sleep with the lights on tonight.

    11 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Freaky

    Coraline was one of those books you read where at first it seems like a perfectly normal book but as you read it if you are a true reader who likes to really think about the book it is a bit unsetttling. The book is ok in some ways but on the whole the book is a little freaky. If you like books that freak you out then this book is for you but if you are like most sane people steer clear of this book. But if you are one of those people who like that kind of thing read the book then watch the movie.

    11 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Captivatingly creepy

    Overall I really enjoyed the book. It was a very quick read and I did wish that it had another hundred pages to it where it could have gone into more depth about some of the trials Coraline faced, or perhaps introduce some new elements. It also felt like it took perhaps a little long to get started, but that back story really helped, so I probably wouldn't remove it except for the fact that younger readers might get bored before getting into the meat of the tale.

    My main curiosity is as to the target demographic. This definitely seemed a bit more scary than the Goosebumps books my son has been reading. I don't necessarily think it's too scary for him but I am still nervous about handing it to him to read on a school night (for fear of a nightmare filled sleepless night). It's definitely a dark read.

    Maybe I'm making kids out to be more wussy than they are but this seemed like too much for younger kids...and yet teenagers may be put off by how young the protagonist is and how simplistic the events are.

    This is a lot of fun and I can recommend it to older readers with a penchant for the creepy but am hesitant to recommend it to kids under ~10. I'm definitely interested to see how the movie plays out...from the previews I've seen, it looks more entertaining/whimsical than the book (the preview shows numerous "fun" elements that aren't in the book)...which means it might be more accessible to younger kids. If anybody's seen the movie, let me know what you think.

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2009

    This book is fun and not so light-hearted

    Coraline was an endearing childrens book with an edge. I absolutely loved it and highly recommend it.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Coraline

    Very well detailed. Its even better detailed than the movie! If you trying to decide between Coraline and another book, Pick this one! Be ready to take a ride in Coraline! Hope this review helped!!!!!

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Find out more by going in the little door.....

    Coraline is a fabulous book because it has really interesting drawings. It also has terrific details. Coraline is about a girl that found a door and when she went inside it she went in to a world that looked exactly about the one she left. One thing was different everyone had button eyes and she had a so called "other mother and father." They did everything for her but are they really as nice as they seem? Read Coraline to find out. One of my favourite parts in this book was when Coraline was in the theatre because Miss Spink and forcible flew Coraline around in a trapeze. I would recommend book to anyone who likes a few thrills and a bit of mystery.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

    Fun

    Fun read, very whimsical, and had some nice passages.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2009

    Daughter chose book to compare/contrast with the movie version...

    My daughter chose this book to read so that we could compare it to the movie version. It was just as creepy as the movie, but well written. It was fun to read this book together and discuss the differences and similarities.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2009

    thrilling

    I thought that the book was very interseting and exciting. coraline is always having her name said wrong. Every time it is frustrating for her she hollors at them that there name is coraline not caraline. overall the book had things that should not have been in there. this is all my opinion so dont take it personal.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    Great

    Wonderful but i do have to agree its a bit freaky.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 2, 2010

    A Lively Journey to the Unknown

    Fantastic book if you do not mind the creepiest corners of the imagination. Coraline is a lesson in perseverance, imagination, and humor. The darkest parts of the story are creepy, if not terrifying, and make for a great and easy read. I would not recommend this for the younger reader who may struggle with the concepts of realism vs. magic. Definitely a great ghost story.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2012

    Coraline Review

    This is a chilling book but I love it. The movie was not very different and as soon as it came out, I bought it. My sister is afraid of this book and movie, but she has no imagination. I think the story is interesting and very unique. I like to write but I could never have made a story like this. Well done, I could give it ten stars!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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