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Core PHP Programming (Prentice Hall Ptr Core Series) / Edition 3

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Overview

Core PHP Programming, Third Edition is the authoritative guide to the new PHP 5 for experienced developers. Top PHP developer Leon Atkinson and PHP 5 contributor/Zend Engine 2 co-creator Zeev Suraski cover every facet of real-world PHP 5 development, from basic syntax to advanced object-oriented development -- even design patterns! It’s all here: networking, data structures, regular expressions, math, configuration, graphics, MySQL/PostgreSQL support, XML, algorithms, debugging, optimization…and 650 downloadable code examples, with a Foreword by PHP 5 contributor and Zend Engine 2 co-creator Andi Gutmans!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Back when PHP was new, programmers searching for practical information invariably found their way to Leon Atkinson’s Core PHP Programming. Well, PHP isn’t new anymore. It’s matured into an exceptionally powerful language, complete with a new object model and its own design patterns. Core PHP Programming, Third Edition covers all those enhancements with the depth they deserve. It also contains all the practical code experienced developers need to do just about anything: 650+ examples, most of them fairly sizable.

For this edition, Atkinson brought on a new coauthor and a new technical reviewer. Who are they? Arguably the world’s two leading PHP experts.

New coauthor Zeev Suraski and technical reviewer Andi Gutmans were largely responsible for the PHP 3 rewrite that helped the language take off as a robust, reliable, high-performance web platform. As cofounders of Zend, they created the Zend Engine at the heart of PHP 4, and recently wrapped up the major Zend Engine 2.0 upgrade. They’re personally responsible for crucial PHP features such as the abstracted web server API, thread safety, MySQL support, and output buffering. It’s hard to imagine a more capable author team.

The book is exhaustive -- but never exhausting. No matter how advanced the discussion, the authors always come back to real working code. And the coverage does range far and wide.

If you’re an experienced developer moving to PHP for the first time, the authors’ clear and concise language introduction will build on the experience you already have. Part I reviews all the basics: variables, operators, and expressions; control statements; functions; arrays; classes and objects; disk access, and more.

Part II moves on to the meat-and-potatoes techniques every serious PHP programmer needs to master: managing browser and network I/O; working with the underlying operating system; manipulating data; handling math; configuration; images and graphics; and parsing XML.

There’s extensive coverage of database integration using PHP’s legendary MySQL and PostgreSQL support -- and, of course, you’ll learn how to make the most of the new Zend 2.0 engine.

Then, it’s on to algorithms for building more efficient and optimized applications -- and here, the authors’ exceptional “insider” experience really begins to pay off. You’ll learn how to use PHP to sort, search, and generate random numbers; how to parse and evaluate strings; how to build HTML tables from SQL queries; even how to generate “on-the-fly” graphics.

Part IV contains software engineering coverage at a level and depth we’ve never seen in a PHP book. After a full chapter on HTML integration, the authors present best practices for PHP application design, followed by detailed techniques for optimizing application performance and efficiently debugging code.

The book wraps up by introducing newly identified PHP design patterns for building even more robust software -- including the invaluable Singleton, Factory, and Observer patterns.

Whether you’re a PHP beginner or you’ve been scripting with the language “forever,” this book will grow with you for years to come. You’ll find it indispensable. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

Library Journal
These three guides cover the popular open-source programming language for creating dynamic web sites (see also Computer Media, LJ 3/1/02); libraries owning first editions should update. Essentials addresses topics from installing PHP to working with database systems. Advanced techniques cover working with images and XML, and appendixes include a language reference and recommended online resources. A useful and stripped-down introduction, appropriate for all libraries.Web Development, appropriate for larger libraries and intermediate programmers, focuses on the use of PHP with the equally popular MySQL. Part 1 explains using the language, while Part 2 adds extra value with thorough explanations of real-world projects such as user authentication, shopping carts, and online forums. Appendixes cover installing PHP, Apache, and MySQL under both UNIX and Windows and recommended resources; the CD contains source code, software, and the entire title in PDF format. A good crash course in building dynamic web sites with the two technologies; buy in conjunction with more basic guides. Core relates to intermediate to advanced programmers, tackling the new features and useful functions of the yet-to-be-released PHP v.5. Sample code is provided; the authors ask readers to extend functionality on their own. Appendixes include escape sequences, ASCII codes, operators, tags, configuration, online resources, and a style guide. For libraries serving large programming communities. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130463463
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/8/2003
  • Series: Core Series
  • Edition description: Third Edition, Fully Revised for PHP 5
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 1104
  • Sales rank: 983,533
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.40 (d)

Meet the Author

LEON ATKINSON is a freelance Web developer and architect who has been working with PHP since 1997. He formerly served as chief technologist for Clear Ink in Walnut Creek, CA, where he specialized in designing and implementing complex, PHP-based Web applications that automate business processes. He is author of Core MySQL.

ZEEV SURASKI is co-creator of PHP 5’s Zend Engine 2. He also wrote many of PHP’s core features, including its abstracted Web server API, thread safety, MySQL support, and output buffering. He co-founded Zend Technologies and currently serves as its chief technology officer.

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Read an Excerpt

Forward

When I wrote the Foreword for Leon's second edition, PHP 4 had just started making it big, taking over the market share from PHP 3. The new version made great promises, and looking back it met all of its promises and more. We can see that at present PHP 4 has no doubt not only replaced almost all PHP 3 installations, but has conquered the Web application development market with its millions of installations and use in enterprise companies.

Today, we are again facing exciting times. PHP 5 is about to be released, promising major improvements to the growing PHP community. As with previous versions, the major improvements are at the language level. Zeev and I redesigned the object model—at last dumping the problematic model, which originated from our work in PHP 3. Some of the other changes we made include:

  • Treating objects as handles and not native types, allowing for other new features and fixing some odd behavior.
  • Allowing for private, public, and protected access restrictions on members and methods.
  • Introducing exception handling a la C++'s try/catch.
  • Providing interfaces similar to the ones found in Java giving.
  • And lots more...

PHP 5 is also expected to feature improvements and additions in other areas, including better all-around

In the 3rd edition of Core PHP Programming, Leon has invited my partner Zeev Suraski to cover the PHP 5 language changes. No doubt that Leon's experience in writing PHP books and Zeev's superior knowledge of PHP 5 and its internals have led to a must-buy book for PHP developers.

I hope you enjoy this book and that it accompanies you during the adoption phase of PHP 5.

Andi Gutmans Herzelyia, Israel

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

I. PROGRAMMING WITH PHP.

1. An Introduction to PHP.

The Origins of PHP. PHP Is Better Than Its Alternatives. Interfaces to External Systems. How PHP Works with the Web Server. Hardware and Software Requirements. What a PHP Script Looks Like. Saving Data for Later. Receiving User Input. Choosing Between Alternatives. Repeating Code.

2. Variables, Operators, and Expressions.

A Top-Down View. Data Types. Variables. Constants. Operators. Building Expressions.

3. Control Statements.

The if Statement. The ? Operator. The switch Statement. Loops. exit, die, and return. Exceptions. Declare.

4. Functions.

Declaring a Function. The return Statement. Scope. Static Variables. Arguments. Recursion. Dynamic Function Calls.

5. Arrays.

Single-Dimensional Arrays. Indexing Arrays. Initializing Arrays. Multidimensional Arrays. Casting Arrays. The + Operator. Referencing Arrays Inside Strings.

6. Classes and Objects.

Object-Oriented Programming. The PHP 5 Object Model. Defining a Class. Constructors and Destructors. Cloning. Accessing Properties and Methods. Static Class Members. Access Types. Binding. Abstract Methods and Abstract Classes. User-Level Overloading. Class Autoloading. Object Serialization. Namespaces. The Evolution of the Zend Engine.

7. I/O and Disk Access.

HTTP Connections. Writing to the Browser. Output Buffering. Environment Variables. Getting Input from Forms. Passing Arrays in Forms. Cookies. File Uploads. Reading and Writing to Files. Sessions. The include and require Functions. Don't Trust User Input.

II. FUNCTIONAL REFERENCE.

8. Browser I/O.

Pregenerated Variables. Pregenerated Constants. Sending Text to the Browser. Output Buffering. Session Handling. HTTP Headers.

9. Operating System.

Files. Compressed File Functions. Direct I/O. Debugging. POSIX. Shell Commands. Process Control.

10. Network I/O.

General Network I/O. Sockets. FTP. Curl. SNMP.

11. Data.

Data Types, Constants, and Variables. Arrays. Objects and Classes. User Defined Functions.

12. Encoding and Decoding.

Strings. String Comparison. Encoding and Decoding. Compression. Encryption. Hashing. Spell Checking. Regular Expressions. Character Set Encoding.

13. Math.

Common Math. Random Numbers. Arbitrary-Precision Numbers.

14. Time and Date.

Time and Date. Alternative Calendars.

15. Configuration.

Configuration Directives. Configuration.

16. Images and Graphics.

Analyzing Images. Creating Images.

17. Database.

DBM-Style Database Abstraction. DBX. LDAP. MySQL. ODBC. Oracle. Postgres. Sybase and Microsoft SQL Server.

18. Object Layers.

COM. CORBA. Java.

19. Miscellaneous.

Apache. IMAP. MnoGoSearch. OpenSSL. System V Messages. System V Semaphores. System V Shared Memory.

20. XML.

DOM XML. Expat XML. WDDX.

III. ALGORITHMS.

21. Sorting, Searching, and Random Numbers.

Sorting. Built-In Sorting Functions. Sorting with a Comparison Function. Searching. Indexing. Random Numbers. Random Identifiers. Choosing Banner Ads.

22. Parsing and String Evaluation.

Tokenizing. Regular Expressions. Defining Regular Expressions. Using Regular Expressions in PHP Scripts.

23. Database Integration.

Building HTML Tables from SQL Queries. Tracking Visitors with Session Identifiers. Storing Content in a Database. Database Abstraction Layers.

24. Networks.

HTTP Authentication. Controlling the Browser's Cache. Setting Document Type. Email with Attachments. HTML Email. Verifying an Email Address.

25. Generating Graphics.

Dynamic Buttons. Generating Graphs on the Fly. Bar Graphs. Pie Charts. Stretching Single-Pixel Images.

IV. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING.

26. Integration with HTML.

Sprinkling PHP within an HTML Document. Using PHP to Output All HTML. Separating HTML from PHP. Generating HTML with PHP.

27. Design.

Writing Requirements Specifications. Writing Design Documents. Change Management. Modularization Using include. FreeEnergy. Templates. Application Frameworks. PEAR. URLs Friendly to Search Engines.

28. Efficiency and Debugging.

Optimization. Measuring Performance. Optimize the Slowest Parts. When to Store Content in a Database. Debugging Strategies. Simulating HTTP Connections. Output Buffering. Output Compression. Avoiding eval. Don't Load Extensions Dynamically. Improving Performance of MySQL Queries. Optimizing Disk-Based Sessions. Don't Pass by Reference (or, Don't Trust Your Instincts). Avoid Concatenation of Large Strings. Avoid Serving Large Files with PHP-Enabled Apache. Understanding Persistent Database Connections. Avoid Using exec, Backticks, and system If Possible. Use php.ini-recommended. Don't Use Regular Expressions Unless You Must. Optimizing Loops. IIS Configuration.

29. Design Patterns.

Patterns Defined. Singleton. Factory. Observer. Strategy.

A. Escape Sequences.

B. ASCII Codes.

C. Operators.

D. PHP Tags.

E. PHP Compile-Time Configuration.

F. Internet Resources.

G. PHP Style Guide.

INDEX.

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Preface

Forward

When I wrote the Foreword for Leon's second edition, PHP 4 had just started making it big, taking over the market share from PHP 3. The new version made great promises, and looking back it met all of its promises and more. We can see that at present PHP 4 has no doubt not only replaced almost all PHP 3 installations, but has conquered the Web application development market with its millions of installations and use in enterprise companies.

Today, we are again facing exciting times. PHP 5 is about to be released, promising major improvements to the growing PHP community. As with previous versions, the major improvements are at the language level. Zeev and I redesigned the object model--at last dumping the problematic model, which originated from our work in PHP 3. Some of the other changes we made include:

  • Treating objects as handles and not native types, allowing for other new features and fixing some odd behavior.
  • Allowing for private, public, and protected access restrictions on members and methods.
  • Introducing exception handling a la C++'s try/catch.
  • Providing interfaces similar to the ones found in Java giving.
  • And lots more...

PHP 5 is also expected to feature improvements and additions in other areas, including better all-around XML support, improved streams support, and more.

In the 3rd edition of Core PHP Programming, Leon has invited my partner Zeev Suraski to cover the PHP 5 language changes. No doubt that Leon's experience in writing PHP books and Zeev's superior knowledge of PHP 5 and its internals have led to a must-buy book for PHP developers.

I hope you enjoy this book and that it accompanies you during the adoption phase of PHP 5.

Andi Gutmans Herzelyia, Israel

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2003

    Describes a Very Mature Language

    n what seems like a dazzingly short time, PHP has grown from a simple little language that dynamically generates web pages to a fully fledged object oriented language. Now available in its fifth major revision, PHP code looks so much like C, with the added benefit of being OO. PHP is still very specialised, confined to essentially web server applications. While it is true that PHP is no longer strictly confined to this, the de facto reality is that the vast majority of applications, and the concomitant employment prospects, are in the context of web servers. Clearly, if you are a web programmer, knowing PHP is a big plus. A hardcore way of doing this is to use the online documentation scattered throughout the web, and learn by downloading and analysing code examples. PHP veterans, including maybe the authors, probably did this. Nothing better at the time. While it works for some, this approach is awkward to many, and is quite ad hoc. The danger is in learning quick kludges as opposed to methodically designing and coding, with a full appreciation of the language's extent. Luckily, as PHP has matured, you can turn to this book for a logical pedagogy. The treatment is exhaustive and shows starkly how far PHP has come. For example, you can use all the major encryption algorithms (Rijndael, Serpent, DES...) as extensively and easily as though you were coding in C. On another tack, the image analysis routines now handle all the important image formats (GIF, JPEG, TIFF...). The book displays the breadth of such computing topics now available, and the wealth of library routines in each topic describes the depth of the treatment. Are you familiar with Fortran and the IMSL mathematical package so often associated with it? Or with C++ and its standard template library? Or C and the Numerical Recipes routines? If so, this book lets you appreciate that intellectually, PHP now ranks with those luminaries.

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