CorelDRAW 9 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guide

CorelDRAW 9 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guide

by Phyllis Davis, Steve Schwartz
     
 

Popular among home and business users alike, CorelDRAW is a complete set of tools for creating drawings, illustrations, and multipage documents. With version 9's powerful new features and redesigned interface, you can produce anything from birthday cards to design plans to Web sites. Whether you've depended on CorelDRAW for years or have never used an art program

Overview

Popular among home and business users alike, CorelDRAW is a complete set of tools for creating drawings, illustrations, and multipage documents. With version 9's powerful new features and redesigned interface, you can produce anything from birthday cards to design plans to Web sites. Whether you've depended on CorelDRAW for years or have never used an art program before, you'll find exactly what you need to get right to work in CorelDRAW 9 for Windows: Visual QuickStart Guide.

The book is divided into concise, clearly tabbed sections, each of which builds on previously discussed topics. Thanks to its step-by-step instructions and bountiful screenshots, newcomers to the program will be up and drawing right away. And CorelDRAW veterans will find CorelDRAW 9: VQS a handy reference guide to learning the latest features and discovering new techniques for creating amazing effects.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Presents easy, step-by-step directions with illustrations to take the mystery out of graphic design with CorelDraw 9. Coverage progresses from basics and startup to special effects and printing. For new and experienced users familiar with the Windows environment. Includes b&w screen shots and examples on every page, plus projects. The author is a writer, graphics designer, instructor, and software developer. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780201354515
Publisher:
Peachpit Press
Publication date:
06/04/1999
Series:
Visual QuickStart Guide Series
Pages:
322
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Although CorelDRAW was originally designed with desktop publishing in mind, it has evolved along with the rest of the design community to support the World Wide Web. In versions 7 and 8, you can publish your graphics at the appropriate resolution and color depth and with HTML links established.

CorelDRAW is not only a great resource for generating web graphics, but also a good tool for organization. You can use it as a sketch pad to create a þowchart, mapping out your design and roughing out pages. You can also work out your navigation strategy and icons. Because of the object-oriented nature of CorelDRAW, you can later Þne-tune your roughs to make your Þnal graphics.

Preparing Artwork For The Web
When you prepare art for the web, you want it to look good and download fast. You want the colors to be accurate and predictable - you want your graphics to look the same to web visitors as they look on your own computer. At the same time, you don't want visitors to give up and move on to another site because your graphics take too long to download. Although we can't provide a complete treatise on balancing color Þdelity with transfer speed, here are some general tips.

Keeping Files Small
Make the elements as small as you can and still create the impression you want.
If you use Fountain Þlls, orient the color gradient top-to-bottom rather than side-to-side or diagonally. Because of the compression scheme used in GIF Þles, vertical color gradients compress much smaller than the others.
Use web page backgrounds made of small repeating tiles. The small tile has to be downloaded only once to Þll the entire background, which is a lot faster than downloading a large background image.File FormatsThere are two Þle formats that CorelDRAW can produce that are compact and commonly used for preparing web graphics:
Use JPEG (.jpg) for continuous-tone art such as photos or paintings - art that involves many subtle color or texture differences.
Use Compuserve GIF (.gif) for þat-color, object-oriented artwork. If you're using a version of CorelDRAW that supports the GIF89a format, you may want to use GIF for continuous-tone images that aren't rectangular, because you can designate part of the image as transparent, which makes it easy to silhouette it against a background.

In CorelDRAW 8 the JPEG and GIF export dialog boxes give you a great deal of control over image size and quality, including on-screen previews that let you see in advance how your choices will affect your image. (These dialogs are also available in PHOTO-PAINT 8).

Resolution

Compared to CorelDRAW 8, earlier versions create fairly chunky bitmap graphics, especially at actual size for use on a web site (using the 75 dpi Resolution setting). One way to avoid this problem is to export it at twice actual size (150 dpi), and then use the Image, Resample command in PHOTO-PAINT, or choose Image, Image Size in Photoshop to reduce the resolution down to the 72 dpi used for web graphics. Photoshop and PHOTO-PAINT do a much better job of anti-aliasing bitmaps than the pre-8 CorelDRAW File, Export function. Color

If you're creating web graphics using CorelDRAW 3, 4, 5, or 6, you'll need to use a utility such as Debabelizer to ensure that the color in your artwork is browser-safe - that is, to keep your graphics from changing color when viewed on various computers and to reduce the number of colors in your image to the ones you need, discarding any additional colors in the palette and thus shedding Þl e size.

In CorelDRAW 7 and 8 you can start with a browser-speciÞc palette, such as the Netscape or Internet Explorer palette, to ensure that you don't build your graphics with colors outside of the browser's capability (choose a palette from the View, Color Palette þyout). And the GIF 89a export function automatically reduces the number of colors to those used in your graphic.

Choosing Good Alternatives

There are some web graphics jobs that you can do in CorelDRAW but you probably shouldn't. CorelDRAW provides the capabilities you need to generate most web graphics, but it's better to use a web-page-speciÞc application such as Microsoft's Front Page, Adobe PageMill, Net Objects Fusion, Macromedia Dreamweaver, or Adobe GoLive to assemble the actual web site.

Meet the Author

Phyllis Davis, a principal of Evolution Software, Inc., is a writer, instructor, graphic designer, and software developer. Among her author credits is Peter Norton's Guide to Visual Basic 4 for Windows 95 (Sams). She has numerous design credits for books, fine art posters, and advertisements.

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