×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Corker's Freedom
     

Corker's Freedom

by John Berger
 

See All Formats & Editions

First published thirty years ago, John Berger's tender and bittersweet novel is a book of dreams: dreams of freedom and romance, dreams that intoxicate and redeem, dreams that have the power to exalt their dreamers or dash them against hard truth.
It is the unforgettable, often comical portrait of a dreamer, one William Corker, the genteel proprietor of a London

Overview

First published thirty years ago, John Berger's tender and bittersweet novel is a book of dreams: dreams of freedom and romance, dreams that intoxicate and redeem, dreams that have the power to exalt their dreamers or dash them against hard truth.
It is the unforgettable, often comical portrait of a dreamer, one William Corker, the genteel proprietor of a London employment agency, who, in his sixty-third year, has just moved out of the house he shared with his overbearing sister. As Corker takes his first steps into a life of passions, Berger creates a character of astonishing depth and liveliness—a man whose fantasies and ambitions are at once splendid and tragic.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Berger's first novel, originally published in 1964, depicts a turbulent day in the life of a 63-year-old London man. (Feb.)
Library Journal
By interspersing interior monologs with elaborate accounts of office routine, Berger ( Keeping a Rendezvous , Random, 1992) reveals a day in the life of William Corker, the aging proprietor of a small employment agency in Clapham. Having just fled the house where he had been living with his invalid sister, Corker seeks freedom by moving into rooms above his office and abandoning himself to romantic dreams much like those of J. Alfred Prufrock. In a lecture on the glories of Vienna, Corker gradually speaks what he feels rather than what is expected of him. Soon after this illusory moment of liberation, however, he finds himself penniless and implicated in a criminal conspiracy. Action in Berger's novel is limited, but scrutiny of character is as intense as that found in Proust or Henry James. Minute details are telling and may require patient attention from some readers.-- Albert E. Wilhelm, Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307794321
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/13/2011
Series:
Vintage International
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

John Berger was born in London in 1926. He is well known for his novels and stories as well as for his works of nonfiction, including several volumes of art criticism. His first novel, A Painter of Our Time, was published in 1958, and since then his books have included Ways of Seeing, the fiction trilogy Into Their Labours, and the novel G., which won the Booker Prize in 1972. In 1962 he left Britain permanently, and lived in a small village in the French Alps. He died in 2017.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews