Corporate Communication / Edition 5

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Overview

Master Communcation Strategies and Tools from the Leader!
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780073377735
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
  • Publication date: 12/5/2008
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide
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Table of Contents

Preface to the Fifth Edition

A Note on the Case Method

Chapter 1 The Changing Environment for Business 1

Attitudes toward American Business Through the Years 1

Hollywood: A window on Main Street and Wall Street 6

The Global Village 7

How to Compete in a Changing Environment 10

Recognize the Changing Environment 11

Adapt to the Environment without Compromising Priniciples 12

Don't Assume Problems Will Magically Disappear 12

Keep Corporate Communication Connected to Strategy 14

Conclusion 15

Case: Google Inc. 16

Chapter 2 Communicating Strategically 27

Communication Theory 27

Developing Corporate Communication Strategies 29

Setling and Effective Organization Strategy 29

Analyzing Constituencies 33

Delinering Messages Appropriately 37

Constituency Responses 40

Conclusion: The Corporate Communication Connection to Vision 41

Case: Carson Container Corporation 43

Chapter 3 An Overview of the Corporate Communication Function 45

From "PR" to "CorpComm" 45

The First Spin Doclors 46

A New Function Emerges 47

To Centralize or Decentralize Communications 48

Where Should the Function Report? 50

The Subfunctions within the Function 53

Identity and Image 53

Corporate Advertising and Advocacy 55

Corporate Responsibility 57

Media Relations 58

Marketing Communications 59

Internal Communications 60

Investor Relations 60

Government Relations 61

Crisis Management 61

Conclusion 62

Case: The Hewlett-Packard Company 63

Chapter 4 Identity, Image, Reputation, and Corporate Advertising 67

What Are Identity and Image? 68

Differentiating Organizations through Identity and Image 70

Shaping Identity 70

A VisionThat Inspires 71

Names and Logos 71

Putting It All Together Consistency Is key 75

Identity Management in Action 76

Step 1 Conduct a Identity Audit 76

Step 2 Set Identity Objectives 77

Step 3 Develop Designs and Names 78

Step 4 Develop Protolypes 79

Step 5 Lanuch and Communicate 79

Step 6 Implement the Program 81

Image: In the Eye of the Beholder 81

Building a Solid Reputation 83

Why Reputation Matters 83

Measuring and Managing Reputation 85

Corporate Philanthropy and Social Responsibility 86

What Is Corporate Advertising? 85

Advertising to Reinforce Identity or Enhance Image 88

Advertising to Attract Investment 90

Advertising to Influence Opinions 91

Who Uses Corporate Advertising and Why? 93

Increase Sales 93

Create a Stronger Reputation 95

Recruit and Retain Employes 97

Conclusion 98

Case: JetBlue Airways: Regaining Altitude 99

Chapter 5 Corporate Responsbility 105

What Is Corporate Responsibility? 106

The New Millennium's CR Surge 108

The Upside of CR 111

CR and Corporate Reputation 113

Consumer Values and Expectations: Taking Matters into Their Own Hands 114

Investor Pressures: The Growth of Socially Responsible Investing 116

Responsibility Inside and Out: Employee Involvement in CR 117

Strategic Engagement: The Continued Influence of NGOs 121

Being Green: The Corporation's Responsibility to the Environment 123

Communicating About Corporate Responsibility 126

A Two-Way Street: Creating an Ongoing Dialogue 127

The Dangers of Empty Boasting 127

The Transparency Imperative 129

Getting It Measured and Done: CR Reporting 129

Conclusion 131

Case: Starbucks Coffee Company 134

Chapter 6 Media Relations 155

The News Media 155

The Growth of Business Coverage in the Media 156

Building Better Relations with the Media 158

Conducting Research for Targeting Media 160

Responding to Media Calls 161

Preparing for Media Interviews 162

Gauging Success 164

Maintaining Ongoing Relationships 165

Building a Successful Media Relations Program 166

Involve Media Relations Personnel in Strategy 167

Develop In-House Capabilities 167

Use Outside Counsel Sparingly 167

Developing an Online Media Strategy 168

Extend Your Media Relations Strategy to the Blogosphere 170

Hardle Negative News Effacently 171

Condlusion 172

Case: Adolph Coors Company 173

Chapter 7 Internal Communications 183

Internal Communications and the Changing Environment 183

Organizing the Internal Communication Effort 185

Gools for Effective Internal Commounications 186

Where Should Internal Communications Report? 186

Implementing an Effective Internal Communications Program 188

Communicate Up and Down 188

Make Time for Face-to-Face Meetings 190

Communicate Online 191

Create Employee-Oriented Publications 193

Communicate Visually 195

Focus on Internal Branding 196

Consider the Company Grapevine 197

Management's Role in Internal Communications 198

Conclusion 199

Case: Westwood Publishing 200

Chapter 8 Investor Relations 203

Investor Relations Overview 203

The Evolution of Investor Relations 204

A Framework for Managing Investor Relations 206

The Objectives of Investor Relations 206

Types of Investors 207

Intermediaries 210

Developing an Investor Relations Program 216

How (and Where) Does IR Fit into the Organization? 216

Using IR to Add Vulue 218

Investor Relations and the Changing Environment 220

Conclusion 222

Case: Steelcase, Inc. 223

Chapter 9 Government Relations 229

Government Begins to Manage Business: The Rise of Regulation 230

The Reach of the Regulatory Agencies 231

How Business "Manages" Government: The Rise of Government Relations 232

The Government Relations Function Takes Shape 233

The Ways and Means of Managing Washington 236

Coalition Building 236

CEO Involvement in Government Relations 237

Lobbying on an Individual Busis 237

Political Action Committees 239

Conclusion 240

Case: Disney's America Theme Park: The Third Battle of Bull Run 242

Chapter 10 Crisis Communication 257

What Is a Crisis? 257

Crisis Characteristics 259

Crises From the Past 25 Years 260

1982: Johnson & Johnson's Tylenol Recall 260

1990: The Perrier Benzene Scare 262

1993: Pepsi-Cola's Syringe Crisis 263

The New Millennium: The Online Face of Crises-Data Theft and Beyond 265

How to Prepare for Crises 272

Assess the Risk for Your Organization 273

Set Communication Objectives for Potential Crises 275

Analyze Channel Choice 275

Assign a Different Team to Each Crisis 277

Plan for Centralization 277

What to Include in Formal Plan 278

Communicating During the Crisis 279

Step 1 Get Control of the Situation 280

Step 2 Gather as Much Information as Possible 280

Step 3 Set Up a Centralized Crisis Management Center 280

Step 4 Communicate Early and Often 281

Step 5 Understand the Media's Mission in a Crisis 281

Step 6 Communicate Directly with Affected Constituents 282

Step 7 Remember that Business Must Continue 282

Step 8 Make Plans to Avoid Another Crisis Immediately 282

Conclusion 283

Case: Coca-Cola India 284

Bibliography 301

Index 305

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