The Corvette in the Barn: More Great Stories of Automotive Archaeology
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The Corvette in the Barn: More Great Stories of Automotive Archaeology

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by Tom Cotter
     
 

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If half-open garage doors, canvas-covered cars buried in bushes, or bits of fender tucked behind an old gas station entice you to stop and see if the car of your dreams is rusting away, abandoned, this book for you. Since The Cobra in the Barn first appeared on bookshelves in 2005, author Tom Cotter has been uncovering four-wheeled fairy tales in which collectors

Overview

If half-open garage doors, canvas-covered cars buried in bushes, or bits of fender tucked behind an old gas station entice you to stop and see if the car of your dreams is rusting away, abandoned, this book for you. Since The Cobra in the Barn first appeared on bookshelves in 2005, author Tom Cotter has been uncovering four-wheeled fairy tales in which collectors find dream cars tucked away in barns, bedrooms, and foreign countries. In The Cobra in the Barn, the third in Tom Cotter's automotive barn-find series, the author brings 40 incredible discoveries to light, including a one-of-a-kind stolen Corvette Z06 convertible with only 7,500 miles on the clock stashed in warehouse in Detroit and a man reconnecting with the Hemi Cuda he drove as teenager, complete with the package of Rolaids he left on the dash 30 years earlier. A hog farmer hordes a Corvette racer, an English car lover tracks down a prototype built by a priest determined to create the world's safest car, and several sleuthing enthusiasts uncover the stranger-than-fiction true story behind the infamous Portuguese barn-find hoax. Turn the pages and enter a place where the old lady next door really does have a split-window 'Vette tucked away in the shed. And, yes, Virginia, it's for sale.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760337974
Publisher:
Motorbooks
Publication date:
09/12/2010
Series:
In the Barn Series
Edition description:
First
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
701,917
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Tom Cotter had been involved in nearly every end of the automotive and racing industries before writing his first book. From working as a mechanic and auto salesman to heading the public relations department at Charlotte Motor Speedway, Cotter then formed his own racing and automotive PR agency, Cotter Group. The agency represented some of the largest clients in NASCAR, IndyCar/CART, drag racing, and road racing. He has written biographies of the legendary Holman-Moody race team, Tommy Ivo, and Dean Jeffries, but is best known for his series of barn find books, such as Cobra in the Barn, 50 Shades of Rust, and Barn Find Road Trip. Cotter appears in the Barn Find Hunter series on YouTube, which is distributed by Hagerty Insurance. He teaches public relations at Belmont Abbey College, sits on the advisory board of McPherson College's Auto Restoration program, and is a member of the Road Racing Driver's Club (RRDC). He is married to Pat, and has one son, Brian, and lives in Davidson, North Carolina.

Keith Martin (Portland, Oregon) has been involved with the collector car hobby for more than 30 years. As a writer, publisher, television commentator, and enthusiast, he is constantly on the go, meeting collectors throughout the world. Keith founded the Sports Car Market magazine 20 years ago, and it has developed into the authoritative, informed voice of the collector car hobby.
 
Official Website: www.sportscarmarket.com

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The Corvette in the Barn: More Great Stories of Automotive Archaeology 1.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
neko1962 More than 1 year ago
A disappointment When I bought this book I was very excited to get home and start reading it. Being a huge classic and antique care fan, I could not wait to read the various stories about automotive archeology. About twenty pages into the book I realized that this book is less about automotive archeology and more concerning flipping cars for a profit. These stories all have a similar theme, research or chance upon someone's old car, do anything you can to acquire it, and then resell it for a profit. Some of these guys make ambulance chasing attorneys sound like respectable professions. My point is these old automobiles were owned and stored by guys who loved their cars. They linked romance with their cars. When these owners getup in their years, and the medical bills start piling up, so-called automotive archeologists hound them until they either die or sell them their cars. What kind of premise for a book is that? It certainly is not about the love of old cars, or archeology, it is about greed. The self-indulgent need to acquire something others have and make money from it. Perhaps the romance of aged auto hunting is old school, but those are the kind of folks that stored the cars in the first place. Save your money.