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Corvus
     

Corvus

by Anselm Hollo
 

A new collection from the respected poet and translator.

Overview

A new collection from the respected poet and translator.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ironic in-jokey, post-beat hipster and quietly beautiful lyricist, avant-gardist Hollo (Outlying Districts) graciously draws readers to his work in these poems through both the copious notes supplied with many of them and the gently funny, probing tone assumed throughout. The opening poem ``1991,'' an elegy to his sister, moves in a moment from dark reflection, ``At the rites we think of the old days when belief/ made words reach the dead/ a resonance / gone,'' to light, ``OK Sis/ now of no fixed address in the kingdom of Dis/ Miz Ubi Sunt,'' never failing to carry us along. Hollo often quotes, invokes or directly addresses the poets of his waning generation (Ed Sanders, Robert Creeley, the late Ted Berrigan) or plays himself off poets of all ages and languages, many of whom (Yevtushenko, Brecht, Allen Ginsberg) he has translated into English or Finnish. His preoccupations with literature are woven into reflections in which we spot our more articulate selves; never trite or off-balance, these are poems that sustain. (Dec.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781566890397
Publisher:
Coffee House Press
Publication date:
11/01/1995
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Anselm Hollo is the author of more than forty books and an award-winning translator. Born in Helsinki, Finland, Hollo has lived in the United States for thirty-seven years and now teaches at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. His most recent collection of poems, Notes on the Possibilities and Attractions of Existence, received the San Francisco Poetry Center Award.

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