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Cositas Buenas
     

Cositas Buenas

5.0 1
by Paco de Lucía
 
You wouldn't expect a flamenco guitarist, especially one as jazz-influenced as Paco de Lucía, to bother with samples and studio trickery. But there he is, the most revered guitarist of his generation, playing along to the ghostly voice of departed flamenco god Camarón de la Isla. The result is not nearly as creepy, as, say, Natalie

Overview

You wouldn't expect a flamenco guitarist, especially one as jazz-influenced as Paco de Lucía, to bother with samples and studio trickery. But there he is, the most revered guitarist of his generation, playing along to the ghostly voice of departed flamenco god Camarón de la Isla. The result is not nearly as creepy, as, say, Natalie Cole's duet with her dead father, for a couple of reasons. One, de Lucia's playing is as fluid and multicolored as ever; two, the point of Cositas Buenas, his first studio album in five years, is this interplay of voice and guitar. Six of the eight tracks feature vocalists, two of them de Lucía himself, and the Camarón number, "Que Venga el Alba," is instructive. Unlike a dance track, where a sampled singer would provide the color to the rhythm track, it's the whiskey-shredded voice that guides the song, with de Lucía and Camarón's longtime partner, José Fernández Torres ("Tomatito"), accenting with guitar. The dissolution of his touring ensemble is a hint of de Lucía's new direction: The colors here are almost all his, from the guitar and voice to bouzouki, mandolin, and lute. It makes for an intimate performance, but by no means a moody one - the rumba "El Dengue" bounces along, full of light, and on "Antonia," the guitarist's young daughter contributes some innocent vocalizing. The guest singers are predominately women, giving a suppleness to the proceedings, often in airy choruses -- a typical nuevo flamenco touch. De Lucía's technique is dazzling in its breadth, quoting song styles from tropical to Mediterranean to jazz. The closer, featuring guests Jerry Gonzalez (the trumpeter has been living in Spain for a few years), pop star Alejandro Sanz (not singing but instead playing trés), and bassist Alain Pérez, brings a jazzy close to a refreshing album from the maestro.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Thom Jurek
On his first outing in five years, and the first of the new century, flamenco guitarist Paco De Lucia has given us one of the most sublime recordings in his long career. This collection of "Good Little Things" (Cositas Buenas) is a step away from Nuevo flamenco, and back to the grain of the source music itself. It is a record full of handclapped rhythms, organic spare percussion, and burning, passionate songwriting and singing. The various singers -- including Paco himself -- wail, chant, moan, and ecstatically intone his new songs to the sheer rough-hewn grace of his playing. Most tracks are done in the canonical style of guitar, and voice with handclap accompaniment, but there are two -- the smoking, burning black soul of "El Dengue" and "Que Venga el Alba," on which he is accompanied by another guitarist. On the album's final cut, "Cassa Bernardo," a rumba, Jerry Gonzalez adds his mariachi trumpet to the proceedings. Cositas Buenas is an album that careens across the history of flamenco. While rooted in antiquity, it nonetheless points the way to a new music, one that extrapolates rhythm and harmony and adds syncopation, texture, depth, and multi-layered harmonics to the original framework. It is transcendentally beautiful if overwhelming in its passion and the sheer joy of performance. Indeed, Cositas Buenas sets a new standard for modern flamenco music and acts as the true bridge between the ancient and the future. No one but a master who cares nothing for his laurels could have articulated such a work.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/27/2004
Label:
Blue Thumb
UPC:
0602498660669
catalogNumber:
000193902
Rank:
277852

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Cositas Buenas 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Paco's new cd sounds really great. The choice of palos is kinda narrow but that makes for a lean rhythmic album with a good flow. Eight songs in 38 minutes. Not sure what the B&N reviewer Mark Schwartz is talking about where he mentions "9 of 11 songs". There's only eight. Cigala, Potito, and La Tana all sound good. The piece with Camaron's vopice is a little eerie but powerful. I must also mention that Thom Jurek's AMG review is ridiculous, he mentions "another guitarist", well Thom in fact it's Tomatito. Also, Jerry Gonzalez's trumpet playing is not mariachi, he's a Nuyorican and his playing is from the Afro-Cuban Jazz tradition. Attn AMG: get better reviewers.