Cosmic

( 44 )

Overview

Liam has always had trouble keeping his feet on the ground. Being 239,000 miles from earth doesn't make it any easier.

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Cosmic

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Overview

Liam has always had trouble keeping his feet on the ground. Being 239,000 miles from earth doesn't make it any easier.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booklist (starred review)
In his latest extravagantly imaginative and marvelously good-natured novel, [Frank Cottrell Boyce has] written one that is bound to win readers’ hearts...This is not only a story about big lads, but also about dads and dadliness!
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
A story of human possibility with a lot of adventure, or an adventure with full credit given to human possibility? Either way, it’s a fantastic, funny, and moving novel....Celebrates not only the spirit of exploration but the human connectedness that allows it to flower.
Washington Post
Hilariously inventive. Frank Cottrell Boyce makes you laugh and think about parents and growing up, about the goodness of gravity and the infinite stars.
New York Times Book Review
With echoes of Roald Dahl . . . the novel ends with an elegant punch line, and a touching endorsement of filial love.
The Guardian
His third novel, and his best yet. Hugely funny and utterly gripping.
London Times
Cottrell Boyce has a gift for suspending disbelief, for laugh-out-loud comedy. “Cosmic” is Liam’s favorite term of approval. It applies to this book.
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)
“Stunningly original…the concept is immediately booktalkable and the telling is riveting; a book of such wealth—of any kind—is valuable indeed.” — The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review of Millions
Mary Quattlebaum
…hilariously inventive…As with his acclaimed Millions, author Frank Cottrell Boyce makes you laugh and think about parents and growing up, about the goodness of gravity and the infinite stars.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
The hero of Boyce’s enchanting third novel has grown a bit over the summer. “Seven inches is not a spurt,” his father says. “Seven inches is a mutation.” Having facial hair and the height of an adult is a nuisance for 12-year-old Liam, until he realizes he can pass for a grownup. The charade escalates into danger when Liam passes himself off as his own father and wins a trip to a new theme park in China with his friend Florida, where they will be the first to experience an out-of-this-world new thrill ride. “The Rocket” turns out to be a real rocket, and the novel opens with Liam and four other kids literally lost in space. What follows is a hilarious and heartfelt examination of “dadliness” in all its forms, including idiotic competitiveness and sports chatter, but also genuine care and concern. Luckily for the errant space cadets, Liam possesses skills honed playing World of Warcraft online—yes, here is a novel, finally, that confirms that playing computer games can be good for you. A can’t-miss offering from an author whose latest novel may be his best yet. Ages 8–12. (Jan.)
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Although Liam Digby is a typical kid who loves World of Warcraft video games and theme-park rides, his physical appearance is closer to age 30 than 12. Looking like an adult is challenging, but it can be useful. He learns about an experimental project to create the ultimate thrill ride—sending a select group of kids into space. He figures that he has no chance to be one of the chosen youngsters, so he decides to apply as the in-flight father chaperone. After recruiting his friend Florida to pose as his daughter, Liam has to compete with three other candidates to get the job. Although he has brushed up on his "dad skills," it isn't always easy to stay in character. The men are pompous, boring—and not above cheating to get ahead. Meanwhile, Florida has very firm notions of how her "dad" ought to behave and she isn't sure that Liam measures up. Eventually, the project director selects Liam for the space flight, precisely because of his "childlike quality," and the project kids start to look to him as a father figure—even Florida. Then, when an accident sends the rocket out of control, Liam has to assume the adult responsibility of getting them all back safely. Beneath the entertaining science-fiction adventure is a strong theme of individual maturity. While the real grown-ups are self-centered and childish, Liam takes charge with surprisingly mature courage. Readers will appreciate the sharp, realistic, and very funny dialogue as well as Liam's technique of solving real-world problems using his role-playing-game expertise.—Elaine E. Knight, Lincoln Elementary Schools, IL
Kirkus Reviews
Twelve-year-old Liam Digby is Completely Doomed. He's lost in outer space, incommunicado, in a Chinese spacecraft called Infinite Possibility. To further complicate matters, he's an imposter: a tall-for-his-age kid with premature facial hair pretending to be a dad so he could participate in the secret civilian space flight in the first place-a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-style contest in which the winning children get to go on the ultimate thrill ride, an actual rocket. The good news is, the view is amazing: "When you're in it, space looks like the biggest firework display ever-except it's on pause . . . . Even if you're Completely Doomed, you've got to be impressed." On the heels of the Carnegie Medal-winning Millions (2004) and Framed (2006), Cottrell Boyce has created a riveting, affecting, sometimes snortingly funny "what-if" scenario that illuminates the realities of space travel as it thoughtfully examines the nature of adulthood. Liam's musings on what it takes to be a good, responsible father are dryly comical but also charmingly earnest. A high-levity zero-gravity romp. (Science fiction. 10-14)
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
A story of human possibility with a lot of adventure, or an adventure with full credit given to human possibility? Either way, it’s a fantastic, funny, and moving novel....Celebrates not only the spirit of exploration but the human connectedness that allows it to flower.
Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)
This superb humorous and inventive “cosmic” adventure celebrated space travel, friendships, and dads.
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Twelve-year-old Liam looks like an adult, complete with facial hair, in Frank Cottrell Boyce's novel (Walden Pond Press, 2010). The story evolves slowly, emphasizing Liam's early misadventures and the problems that result based on adults' assumptions and his own immaturity. Kirby Heyborne's first person narration captures both Liam's innocence and delight in the "opportunities" afforded him, and his regret at the later consequences. He also gives realistic performances as Liam's parents, other adults, and children Liam encounters in what becomes, briefly, an outer space adventure when he poses as a Dad and takes a group of kids on the greatest ride ever—a trip to outer space in a rocket ship. When the voyage goes awry, Liam is forced to be "the grown up." Liam's efforts to sound like an adult are mingled with his reflections on computer game strategy (complete with lingo). Liam's views on what makes a good Dad are thoughtfully expressed and memorable. A humorous, moving novel.—Edith Ching, University of Maryland, College Park
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Stunningly original…the concept is immediately booktalkable and the telling is riveting; a book of such wealth—of any kind—is valuable indeed.” — The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, starred review of Millions
Booklist
In his latest extravagantly imaginative and marvelously good-natured novel, [Frank Cottrell Boyce has] written one that is bound to win readers’ hearts...This is not only a story about big lads, but also about dads and dadliness!
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Stunningly original…the concept is immediately booktalkable and the telling is riveting; a book of such wealth—of any kind—is valuable indeed." — The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, starred review of Millions
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
From screenwriter and Carnegie Medal-winner Frank Boyce comes this beguiling tale of twelve-year-old Liam Digby who is so tall he is often mistaken for an adult, frustrating for both him and his parents. After some mad adventures pretending to be schoolmate Florida's father, Liam wins a special theme-park trip for fathers and children; he and Florida elude their parents and take off for China. The other winners are three controlling fathers, each stealing his son's childhood in pursuit of money, success, or fame. Liam can only model himself on his own earnest taxi-driver father—neither rich nor successful—and study his dad's self-help manual, Talk to Your Teen. When the prize turns out to be a rocket trip into space for kids only, Liam manages to get aboard as the "responsible adult" and finds himself desperately trying to be "dadly," while helping the other boys reclaim their childhoods and saving their lives. Florida has her own dad issues, but the novel is about boys and men; women are strictly marginal, from Liam's cautious, adventure-quashing mother to brilliant but ruthless Dr. Drax, a theme-park developer who cloned her own perfect, robot-like daughter. This touching, often-funny tale offers much to ponder, much to discuss—including parallels to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—and much to savor such as its engaging hero, his sense of wonder at the universe, an exciting, even harrowing space adventure, and the steady, caring, real father whose gravity draws Liam home. Cosmic! Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
VOYA - Hilary Crew
Liam, almost thirteen, is tall enough to be mistaken for a grown-up, especially when he sprouts facial hair. His ability to pass for much older leads to some hilarious episodes, some with his friend Florida who poses as his "princess" daughter. Their relationship—as they switch from friends to impersonating father and teenage daughter—is beautifully captured by Boyce. But when Liam receives a text message that he has been selected as a dad for the "Biggest Thrill Ride in the History of the World," he faces his biggest challenge yet. Taking Florida with him, he flies to China where he meets the other contestants—three ambitious fathers and their talented sons. Liam proves that he has the qualities to accompany the children on the "Rocket" into space despite being scorned by the other dads as "childish." He has, he is told, the right attitude because he is ready to learn. Boyce brilliantly captures Liam's voice as he switches from a teen delighting, for example, in the sheer fun of being weightless (he feels like a "Power Ranger") to being the "Responsible Adult." Liam uses skills gained from playing Warcraft and Orbiter IV to guide the rocket back to earth when things go awry. His sense of awe and danger when he spacewalks and his crew's joyride to the moon on a solar-powered ship that looks like an "ice-cream van" are paralleled with fascinating facts about astronauts and the science of space travel. This superb humorous and inventive "cosmic" adventure celebrates space travel, friendships, and dads. Reviewer: Hilary Crew
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Twelve-year-old Liam looks like an adult, complete with facial hair, in Frank Cottrell Boyce's novel (Walden Pond Press, 2010). The story evolves slowly, emphasizing Liam's early misadventures and the problems that result based on adults' assumptions and his own immaturity. Kirby Heyborne's first person narration captures both Liam's innocence and delight in the "opportunities" afforded him, and his regret at the later consequences. He also gives realistic performances as Liam's parents, other adults, and children Liam encounters in what becomes, briefly, an outer space adventure when he poses as a Dad and takes a group of kids on the greatest ride ever—a trip to outer space in a rocket ship. When the voyage goes awry, Liam is forced to be "the grown up." Liam's efforts to sound like an adult are mingled with his reflections on computer game strategy (complete with lingo). Liam's views on what makes a good Dad are thoughtfully expressed and memorable. A humorous, moving novel.—Edith Ching, University of Maryland, College Park
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061836886
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/14/2011
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 266,725
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank Cottrell Boyce is the author of two other books for children: Framed and Millions, which was made into a movie by Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle. He lives in England with his family.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 44 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(28)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 44 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Cosmic

    I have read a few of his books, but Cosmic , by far was the best. A little too easy offa read for my age (12) but it was very easy to relate to. Im not a freakishly tall boy, nor do I live in England but this book was AH- MAZING!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2008

    A reviewer

    Frank Cottrell Boyce's new book Cosmic can be appreciated on many different levels, which means both children and adults will enjoy reading it. Twelve-year-old Liam is constantly being treated as though he's much older, simply because he's tall and mature-looking for his age. Boyce sprinkles in many keen life insights beginning on the very first page when Liam says, ¿everyone lies about their age. Adults pretend to be younger. Teenagers pretend to be older. Children wish they were grown-ups. Grown-ups wish they were children.¿ When Liam pretends to be a dad with a daughter who is actually his classmate just so he can win a contest, he finds himself off on an adventure he could have never imagined. He keeps his cool, learning how to be ¿dadly¿ by watching other dads and drawing upon lessons he learned playing World of Warcraft. Liam's innocent observations on human behavior are very funny and perceptive, and you'll keep turning the pages to see where they lead to next. At it's heart, Cosmic is a love story about dads¿what it means to be one as well as what it means to have one. Highly recommended.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    Cosmic is a story that can be enjoyed by any age group. If you e

    Cosmic is a story that can be enjoyed by any age group. If you enjoy comedy and excitement then this is the book for you. The plot is so good that it makes you want to keep turning the pages until you get to the end. The writer’s style is great. I like how the story is so free flowing and how everything is just pieced together perfectly. And on top of that he always seems to hit you with something unexpected. The level of suspense doesn’t hit the peak as it does in a mystery or horror novel, but the suspense is there. He ends the chapter in such a way where you have to continue onto the next chapter
    Liam is a twelve year old boy who lives in Waterloo, England. He goes to school like every normal kid his age; but he has a problem, he is very tall and big so everyone mistakes him for an adult. He always gets made fun of and really only has one friend, named Florida. She is a girl in his grade that is obsessed with anything that has to do with Hollywood. Sometimes they go places and act as if Liam is a dad and Florida is his daughter. Liam looks so old that people actually believe it. One their father-daughter schemes go a little too far and they end up in china waiting to go in rocket which is going up to space. This story is the sequence of events of how they got there and what happens after they get there. It also is about how Liam learns about himself and how to deal with being taller than everyone else and being able to realize it is not a disadvantage.
    There is really a protagonist and antagonist characters in this book but there is a rivalry between Liam and some other characters later on in the story. The characters and the events they go through are both very believable. The author did a good job of making this fiction novel seem as if it could actually take place at this present time. I have never really read any other books like this one. The plot is very good and it is one of the best books I have ever read. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes an adventure novel that is tied in with a little bit of comedy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 10, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Review title: Cosmic Confusion & Chaos? Out of this world fu

    Review title: Cosmic Confusion & Chaos?
    Out of this world fun. A well developed storyline along with an engaging protagonist are sure to keep your attention, when you read "Cosmic". Grab your space gear and prepare for a special surprise as you ride with Liam beyond the Earth's atmosphere for a once-in-his-lifetime thrill ride. Kind of makes you think of "Willy Wonka and His Chocolate Factory" yet with an out in space backdrop.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2011

    SPACE

    Liam is a twelve year old old kid who pretends to be an adult. He looks and acts like and adult. But his spaaceship. roles out of orbit. LIam is trapped in a space ship. Through out the whole book he is talking into a recorder. It talkes about when he was a kid pretending to be an adult. He even pretens he has a daughter,and he test drives a car. It starts out he is on a ride called cosmic. It is said to have changed every wgo goes on it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 17, 2014

    Thoroughly enjoyable read for pre-teens and older!

    Well-researched and humorous exploration of outer space. Protagonist is an 11-year-old boy who is so tall that he is taken for an adult. The author's compassionate stance toward young people AND their parents is refreshing and authentic. The characters are three-dimensional and the plot keeps the reader interested from beginning to end. As an adult, I read this book in little more than one sitting and enjoyed every moment of it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2013

    Great

    This is a great book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2013

    Galaxy

    She walks in, almost regretting her decision of leaving Sun. She sighed and looked up at the stars. She trotted along the forest floor. "Matter....Ozone......please....." The old fox dipped her head to drink from a river. "River-Dog.......Tell me Ozone is with you."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2013

    To all WATCH

    &hearts &clubs &spades &diamonds &star &omega &beta

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2013

    An old favorite!

    I read this book about a year ago. Probably one of the best books i have read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    My name is Pickle

    I have't read any of it, but is good:D

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Dbdhsjdj

    Poopy

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    Amazing

    This book was amazing. Also did you know that this book was an evook and you could get it for free? I got this book for free and it was amazing. You should read this ook if you are bored or have nothing to do at home. Read it a park, maybe under a tree.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    The sample was great

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Cosmic rocks!!!!!!!

    Best book ever! Really humorous. Loved it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2012

    Really!?!

    People! You are old nough to know to spell the words right in your reviews!!! If you spell things wrong, people can't understand you! It is like saying 2+2 is 5!!!!! It is really stupid when you don't spell your words right. Double check your review before hitting post! PLEASE!!!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    By anonymous on february 29 2012

    This book was great and i think it is very ironic because i am in fifth grade and i have a friend who is a boy and is like 5 ft.8 and he kinda has facial hair.. anyway i would highly recommend this book! It was a very entertaining story!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2012

    Best book ever

    Im only elevwn and rrad bigger books than this but it was a realy good book. But now im wondering why he would do that if your wonding wat im talking about then you will just have to purchase the book and find out

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  • Posted October 14, 2011

    Cosmic is cosmic

    This book is about a 12 year old boy who pretends to be a 30 year old man.One day his mom and dad send him off to Little Stars Drama Acting Class, he meets Florida Kirbyftg

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2011

    This sounds so cool

    No text was provided for this review.

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