Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View by Richard Tarnas | Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View

Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View

4.3 9
by Richard Tarnas
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

In Cosmos and Psyche, distinguished philosopher and cultural historian Richard Tarnas demonstrates the existence of an astonishingly consistent correspondence between planetary alignments and the archetypal patterns of human history and biography. Based on thirty years of meticulous research, this brilliant book points to a radical change in our understanding of the

Overview

In Cosmos and Psyche, distinguished philosopher and cultural historian Richard Tarnas demonstrates the existence of an astonishingly consistent correspondence between planetary alignments and the archetypal patterns of human history and biography. Based on thirty years of meticulous research, this brilliant book points to a radical change in our understanding of the cosmos, shining new light on the drama of history and on our own critical age. It opens up a new cosmic horizon that reunites science and religion, intellect and soul, modern reason and ancient wisdom.

Editorial Reviews

Thirty years in the making, Richard Tarnas's Cosmos and Psyche defies easy categorization. In this major work, Tarnas, a Harvard-educated historian and professor of philosophy and psychology, proposes a consistent correspondence between planetary cycles and the unfolding of history. With fascinating evidence that would brighten the day of any cosmologist, he argues that our present era is most comparable to the tumultuous, creative epoch of the High Renaissance.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670032921
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/19/2006
Pages:
592
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.86(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

author of Between Two Ages: The 21st Century a William Van Dusen Wishard
Majestic, sweeping, and profound... This will be a book for the ages. (William Van Dusen Wishard, author of Between Two Ages: The 21st Century and the Crisis of Meaning)
professor of philosophy and religious studies Youngstown State Un Christopher Bache
Breathtaking in the scope and scale of its vision, this extraordinary book shatters our cosmological assumptions ... Spellbinding, eloquent, compelling. (Christopher Bache, professor of philosophy and religious studies, Youngstown State University)
From the Publisher
Breathtaking in the scope and scale of its vision, this extraordinary book shatters our cosmological assumptions . . . Spellbinding, eloquent, compelling. (Christopher Bache, professor of philosophy and religious studies, Youngstown State University)

Majestic, sweeping, and profoundà This will be a book for the ages. (William Van Dusen Wishard, author of Between Two Ages: The 21st Century and the Crisis of Meaning)

Meet the Author

Richard Tarnas is a Harvard-educated historian and professor of philosophy and psychology, and the author of The Passion of the Western Mind. He is the founding director of the Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness graduate studies program at the California Institute of Integral Studies, and also teaches on the faculty of Pacifica Graduate Institute.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With its open-minded spirit of hypothesis, empirical observation, and ongoing theoretical refinement, this book is a scientific triumph, scientific in the highest sense of the word: Here is the evidence, and here is a possible theory to explain the evidence. Most importantly, the correlations in Tarnas' methodology are replicable. Anyone with a knowledge of the basic tools of this method of analysis, which he carefully introduces, can investigate the patterning of archetypal principles in his or her own life. To preemptively criticize this body of research without actually investigating it, to refuse to look through the telescope for oneself, might, I believe, be symptomatic of a vested emotional position rather than a genuinely scientific attitude toward the evolution of knowledge. Tarnas recognizes and even celebrates the virtue of skepticism, as Santayana did when he referred to skepticism as 'the chastity of the intellect.' Yet Tarnas goes further, reminding us that while 'the mind that seeks the deepest intellectual fulfillment does not give itself up to every passing idea,' what is sometimes forgotten is that the purpose of skepticism is not to be an end in itself but to prepare us to be ready when a new and deeper truth finally arrives.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If an eminent scholar and acclaimed cultural historian were to publish a major study of human history insightfully analyzing and interpreting various notable epochs and their formative figures, then the intellectual community would be entirely open to, and interested in, what this person had to say. If this person were at the same time to present a variety of parallel phenomena -- geographic, political, biological etc. -- demonstrating correlations between these two lines of phenomena, then the intellectual community would be moved to seriously consider and engage this new knowledge. But what if, most boldly, the phenomena being demonstrated as parallel with the mozaic of cultural history were to be the major alignments of the outermost planets -- what then? Richard Tarnas, author of the acclaimed cultural history, 'Passion of the Western Mind', has presented us with just such a paradigmatically challenging and mind-expanding account of a human-cosmic connection. With 'Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New World View', he has produced a penetrating analysis of the complex thematic character of a number of generally recognized significant historical moments and epochs, revealing how the peaks and valleys of the earthly course of human unfolding demonstrate a rhythmic concordance with the peaks and valleys of the outer-planetary dance. As the church fathers were invited to look through Galileo's telescope we are invited to examine certain newly discovered phenomena. Are we to cling to our old dogma and refuse to look, or are we to open our minds -- indeed without putting aside our critical faculties -- to see what this obviously credible historian and new paradigmatic thinker has to say? By revealing the very architecture of the evolving collective psyche in resonance with a 're-enchanted' cosmos, Cosmos and Psyche points us toward a greater coherence beyond postmodern fragmentation. Rather than our universe being solely dead matter and rocks banging around according to the laws of physics, as Tarnas explains, it is the confirmation of the cosmological dimension as meaningful that provides the missing dimension of all new paradigm strategies which, especially after Jung, deal very well with psyche but leave cosmos out of the picture. Tarnas's opus does not require a previous knowledge of astrology or even a general prior acceptance of it. The astrological configurations that Tarnas engages in his account are necessarily basic both in order to be accessible for the non-astrological public and also to provide clear and verifiable evidence rather than esoteric complexification. In full accordance with astrological consensus, the author provides a lucid yet profound introduction to the archetypal meanings of the relevant astrological principles. In order to attempt in good faith to refute this book, one would need the scholarship necessary to argue extensively against the characterization of the essentials of a certain period or event, against the interpretations of various works of art, or against the significance of numerous discoveries. One would have to be able to demonstrate convincingly -- with many counter examples -- either how there are in fact no real historical peaks, or that the peaks which Tarnas identifies are questionably chosen simply to fit the theory, or that in each specified period in which relevant works and events are cited that there are just as many events and works of the same essential quality that can be found equally distributed across other times bearing no astro-archetypal resonance to them. A rejection based on anything less than such a meticulous scholarly counter-argument would be cavalier and intellectually disingenuous. But intellectually honest critique and interpretative differences promoting constructive dialogue in the field are entirely appropriate and even required by a work of this magnitude.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended. Very interesting. Well written.Plan to buy his earlier book today.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Composed in a lithe, ethereal pen that is as effortlessly read as it is elegantly written, Cosmos and Psyche presents nothing less than the strongest statistical corroboration of the astrological hypothesis ever written. The sheer volume of coincidences between planetary alignments and historical events is breathtaking. That the coincidences do, in fact, exist is beyond the contumely of l'sceptique. Yet I do have my reservations, foremost of which arise from Tarnas' gaunt display of counterfactual data, or of a means to falsify the paradigm he proposes to account for the coincidences with, albeit broad or precise. It was only in light of this that, after experiencing Cosmos & Psyche, I was left with the profoundest sense of the question: Ceteris Paribus, is this evidence of a cosmic conspiracy of worlds - or simply one man manipulating his conclusions to comform with his premises?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Buoyed up by the very positive reviews given to this book, I was very looking forward to what I had been told was a great book. In many ways it is a great book, but astrologers might find it to be a case of `been there ¿ done that¿. I would recommend it, and Tarnas has a great way of expressing himself, but there is a lot of data to be ploughed through and some parts of this book made for heavy reading. At the end I¿m not sure how enlightened I felt as a result.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the most important book about astrology in decades (maybe centuries). It's no exaggeration to describe this as a breakthrough that will surely heighten awareness of humanity's connection with the cosmos. Richard Tarnas' protean intellect and lucid prose rewards the reader on every page. This is a shot across the bow of academics who have failed to include astrology in their understanding of our culture.