Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power

Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power

4.5 2
by Gene Dattel
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1566637473

ISBN-13: 9781566637473

Pub. Date: 09/16/2009

Publisher: Dee, Ivan R. Publisher

Since the earliest days of colonial America, the relationship between cotton and the African-American experience has been central to the history of the republic. America's most serious social tragedy, slavery and its legacy, spread only where cotton could be grown. Both before and after the Civil War, blacks were assigned to the cotton fields while a pervasive

Overview

Since the earliest days of colonial America, the relationship between cotton and the African-American experience has been central to the history of the republic. America's most serious social tragedy, slavery and its legacy, spread only where cotton could be grown. Both before and after the Civil War, blacks were assigned to the cotton fields while a pervasive racial animosity and fear of a black migratory invasion caused white Northerners to contain blacks in the South.

Gene Dattel's pioneering study explores the historical roots of these most central social issues. In telling detail Mr. Dattel shows why the vastly underappreciated story of cotton is a key to understanding America's rise to economic power. When cotton production exploded to satiate the nineteenth-century textile industry's enormous appetite, it became the first truly complex global business and thereby a major driving force in U.S. territorial expansion and sectional economic integration. It propelled New York City to commercial preeminence and fostered independent trade between Europe and the United States, providing export capital for the new nation to gain its financial "sea legs" in the world economy. Without slave-produced cotton, the South could never have initiated the Civil War, America's bloodiest conflict at home.

Mr. Dattel's skillful historical analysis identifies the commercial forces that cotton unleashed and the pervasive nature of racial antipathy it produced. This is a story that has never been told in quite the same way before, related here with the authority of a historian with a profound knowledge of the history of international finance. With 23 black-and-white illustrations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781566637473
Publisher:
Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
Publication date:
09/16/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.50(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

Preface....................ix
Acknowledgments....................xiii
1 The Silent Issue at the Constitutional Convention....................5
2 Birth of an Obsession....................27
3 Land Expansion and White Migration to the Old Southwest....................39
4 The Movement of Slaves to the Cotton States....................50
5 The Business of Cotton....................61
6 The Roots of War....................85
7 Being Free and Black in the North....................107
8 The Colonial North....................111
9 Race Moves West....................134
10 Tocqueville on Slavery, Race, and Money in America....................154
11 Cultivating a Crop, Cultivating a Strategy....................163
12 Great Britain and the Civil War....................177
13 Cotton and Confederate Finance....................184
14 Procuring Arms....................193
15 Cotton Trading in the United States....................201
16 Cotton and the Freedmen....................209
17 New Era, Old Problems....................221
18 Ruling the Freedmen in the Cotton Fields....................243
19 Reconstruction Meets Reality....................253
20 The Black Hand on the Cotton Boll....................266
21 From Cotton Field to Urban Ghetto: The Chicago Experience....................283
22 King Cotton Expands....................293
23 The Controlling Laws of Cotton Finance....................302
24 The Delta Plantation: Labor and Land....................313
25 The Planter Experience in the Twentieth Century....................348
26 TheLong-Awaited Mechanical Cotton Picker....................352
27 The Abdication of King Cotton....................358
Appendix....................367
Notes....................373
Index....................399

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Cotton and Race in the Making of America: The Human Costs of Economic Power 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic book, very informative, it supported what I have always taught to be a fact about the African American influence on America's history and its economic rise to power.