Could John Stuart Mill Have Saved Our Schools?

Could John Stuart Mill Have Saved Our Schools?

by Siegfried Engelmann, Douglas Carnine
     
 
Coauthors Siegfried Engelmann and Douglas Carnine are foundational 20th and 21st century thinkers on the subject of instructional best practices. Engelmann shaped and codified Direct Instruction, the most effective method of teaching reading, math, and other subjects, as validated by more than 100 experimental studies. The authors' contention is that if the details of

Overview

Coauthors Siegfried Engelmann and Douglas Carnine are foundational 20th and 21st century thinkers on the subject of instructional best practices. Engelmann shaped and codified Direct Instruction, the most effective method of teaching reading, math, and other subjects, as validated by more than 100 experimental studies. The authors' contention is that if the details of instruction are in place (well designed sets of examples and adequate practice), student learning can be accelerated far beyond what is currently being achieved in schools. Their ideas, as presented in this book, are in tune with John Stuart Mill's System of Logic. Engelmann and Carnine look at Mill's 1843 publication, which describes four major templates for organizing examples so they support only one interpretation. Mill applied these templates to science. He contended that although his methods could be used to instruct others, his system of logic did not apply to education. Engelmann and Carnine apply them to instruction and present arguments that the methods fit instruction better than they fit science. Engelmann and Carnine speculate as to the impact Mill's methods could have had on education in the early 20th century, and how these changes would have greatly changed the way we teach today. The authors apply Mill's rules to their own work on Direct Instruction and show how well it aligns with them. They also show the importance of combining the logical analysis with empirical data that confirm what learners learn. With many examples and interesting historical asides, this book postulates an instructional methodology that could have been ours a century ago had Mill included education as a science and not an art. More importantly, it shows that if today's educators adopt instruction that is consistent with Mill's methods, education could still become a science resulting in our schools improving dramatically.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013666795
Publisher:
Attainment Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/17/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
182
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Siegfried Engleman is a professor of education at the University of Oregon and is the originator of Direct Instruction (DI) as an approach to teaching. / Douglas Carnine is a Professor or Education at the University of Oregon and is Director of the National Center to Improve the Tools of Educators.

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