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Couldn't Stand the Weather
     

Couldn't Stand the Weather

4.0 3
by Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble
 

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Stevie Ray Vaughan's second album, Couldn't Stand the Weather, pretty much did everything a second album should do: it confirmed that the acclaimed debut was no fluke, while matching, if not bettering, the sales of its predecessor, thereby cementing Vaughan's status as a giant of modern blues. So why does it feel like a letdown? Perhaps because it simply offers

Overview

Stevie Ray Vaughan's second album, Couldn't Stand the Weather, pretty much did everything a second album should do: it confirmed that the acclaimed debut was no fluke, while matching, if not bettering, the sales of its predecessor, thereby cementing Vaughan's status as a giant of modern blues. So why does it feel like a letdown? Perhaps because it simply offers more of the same, all the while relying heavily on covers. Of the eight songs, half are covers, while two of his four originals are instrumentals -- not necessarily a bad thing, but it gives the impression that Vaughan threw the album together in a rush, even if he didn't. Nevertheless, Couldn't Stand the Weather feels a bit like a holding pattern, since there's no elaboration on Double Trouble's core sound and no great strides forward, whether it's in Vaughan's songwriting or musicianship. Still, as holding patterns go, it's a pretty enjoyable one, since Vaughan and Double Trouble play spiritedly throughout the record. With its swaggering, stuttering riff, the title track ranks as one of Vaughan's classics, and thanks to a nuanced vocal, he makes W.C. Clark's "Cold Shot" his own. The instrumentals -- the breakneck Lonnie Mack-styled "Scuttle Buttin'" and "Stang's Swang," another effective demonstration of Vaughan's jazz inclinations -- work well, even if the original shuffle "Honey Bee" fails to make much of an impression and the cover of "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)" is too reminiscent of Jimi Hendrix's original. So, there aren't many weaknesses on the record, aside from the suspicion that Vaughan didn't really push himself as hard as he could have, and the feeling that if he had, he would have come up with something a bit stronger.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/23/1999
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074646587126
catalogNumber:
65871

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble   Primary Artist,Track Performer
Fran Christina   Drums
Stan Harrison   Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone
Chris Layton   Drums,Group Member
Tommy Shannon   Bass,Group Member
Jimmie Vaughan   Guitar
Stevie Ray Vaughan   Guitar,Vocals,Track Performer,Interviewee,Group Member

Technical Credits

John Hammond   Executive Producer
Earl King   Composer
Hound Dog Taylor   Composer
John Hammond   Producer,Executive Producer
W.C. Clark   Composer
Jimi Hendrix   Composer
Amy Herot   Producer
Michael Kindred   Composer
Chris Layton   Producer
Richard Mullen   Producer,Engineer
Tommy Shannon   Producer
Stevie Ray Vaughan   Producer
Bill Milkowski   Liner Notes
Tim White   Producer,Interviewer
Bob Irwin   Engineer,Reissue Producer
Vic Anesini   Producer
Josh Cheuse   Artwork,Art Direction
Tony Martell   Executive Producer
Holland MacDonald   Cover Design
Kevin Boutate   Engineer
Jim Capfer   Producer
Andy Denemark   Producer
Norm Pattiz   Executive Producer
John F. Hammond   Executive Producer
Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones   Composer

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Couldn't Stand the Weather 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Out of all of SRV's records "Couldn't Stand the Weather" is by far my favorite. Stevie Ray Vaughan is nothing but better on this album, if that is possible. Scuttle Buttin' is an amazing blues solo that you can just imagine him playing on stage with the guitar behind his back. Couldn't Stand the Weather is by far my favorite song he ever wrote. The song fades in with short blues lines before you get hit with a heavy, slightly distorted electric guitar, which he leads into an awesome rhythm that just flows. It's like he was jamming, playing around on his guitar and it came out. Tin Pan Alley, though a lengthy song, doesn't feel long, it's a slow blues tune with great licks. Honey Bee, an original piece, definately borrows from the song Hide Away, however I must admit the blues riff of Hide Away is one of my favorite blues riffs, the Texas Shuffle, of any song. The last track Stang's Swang shows Stevie Ray Vaughan leading into some jazz, which his brother said Stevie enjoyed listening too. This album is nothing less than outstanding with great extras like "Hide Away" by F. King, Look at Little Sister, Come On (Pt. III) and Give Me Back My Wig by Hound Dog Taylor. I have yet to get tired of this album with the variety it gives, plus it's just fun to listen too. I highly recommend this CD!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an album that has a lot going for it. Mostly, it was yet another example of the six-string genius that was SRV. Overall, one will probably enjoy "The Things that I Used to do" more than any other track, except for the title. The cover of "Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)" is a nice touch, but that was a song that belonged on stage during a live show, and seems like filler when put to record. As for the rest, "Scuttle Buttin'", "Cold Shot" are as good as it is going to get. Considering they recorded this album in six weeks, it is a small miracle that it turned out this good.