Count Us In: Growing Up with Down Syndrome
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Count Us In: Growing Up with Down Syndrome

4.8 4
by Jason Kingsley, Mitchell Levitz
     
 

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At ages nineteen and twenty-two, respectively, Jason Kingsley and Mitchell Levitz shared their innermost thoughts, feelings, hopes, and dreams, their lifelong friendship—and their experiences growing up with Down syndrome. Their frank discussion of what mattered most in their lives—careers, friendships, school, sex, marriage, finances, politics, and

Overview


At ages nineteen and twenty-two, respectively, Jason Kingsley and Mitchell Levitz shared their innermost thoughts, feelings, hopes, and dreams, their lifelong friendship—and their experiences growing up with Down syndrome. Their frank discussion of what mattered most in their lives—careers, friendships, school, sex, marriage, finances, politics, and independence—earned Count Us In numerous national awards, including the EDI Award from the National Easter Seal Society. More important, their wit, intelligence, candor, and charm made a powerful and inspirational statement about the full potential of people with developmental disabilities, challenging prevailing stereotypes.

Now, thirteen years later, the authors discuss their lives since then—milestones and challenges, developments expected and unexpected—in a new afterword.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

PRAISE FOR COUNT US IN

"Their parents were told to expect nothing. But Jason Kingsley and Mitchell Levitz were lucky, because their parents didn’t listen. They gave their sons that chance to show how far they could go—and they’ve astounded everyone! Count Us In tells their story."—JANE PAULEY

In 1994, Jason Kingsley and Mitchell Levitz, two resourceful young men with Down syndrome, wrote a book about their condition, their situation, and their aspirations. At the time, the mere publication of Count Us In was regarded as extraordinary; many people had never imagined that individuals with Down syndrome could be so perceptive and articulate. Since that time, public awareness has progressed. And so, too, have coauthors Kingsley and Levitz, making it only natural that they update their candid, insightful book. An inclusionary message relevant to us all.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156031950
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/05/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
776,156
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x (d)
Lexile:
830L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

JASON KINGSLEY graduated from high school in 1994 and in 1997 from Maplebrook School, a postsecondary transitional program. He has received the Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation Families Award, among many others recognizing his contribution toward better understanding and acceptance of people with developmental disabilities. He lives in Hartsdale, New York.

MITCHELL LEVITZ graduated from high school in 1991 and is now a consumer issues specialist at the Westchester Institute for Human Development. He also serves on the board of directors of the National Down Syndrome Society. In 2004 Mitchell received the Daniel Piper Self-Advocacy Award. He lives in Cortlandt Manor, New York.

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Count Us In: Growing Up with Down Syndrome 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book for class and I enjoyed it very much. The stories of the authors will make you laugh. Great read to learn about two different perspectives about down syndrome and how they dealt with having a developmental disability.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I know a person who used to be in my class and everyone was mean to her but there was one girl who was nice to her. I guess it was because she was sweet and hugged everyone. Now ihave a friend and her little brother has downs and it breaks my heart that we were mean. Everyone who has interactes with children with downs should read this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MarVee More than 1 year ago
I gave this book to my Sister-in-law, mother of my 19 year old twin nephews who have Downs, and she really hasn't said anything about it, but my nephew Jamie loved it and I would certainly recommend it for any teenager with Downs, who can read and if they have been mainstreamed their classmates would also find it helpful