Count Zero

( 62 )

Overview

Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties—some of whom aren't remotely human.

Bobby Newmark is entirely human: a rustbelt ...

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Count Zero

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Overview

Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties—some of whom aren't remotely human.

Bobby Newmark is entirely human: a rustbelt data-hustler totally unprepared for what comes his way when the defection triggers war in cyberspace. With voodoo on the Net and a price on his head, Newmark thinks he's only trying to get out alive. Until he meets the angel.

A stylish, streetsmart, frighteningly probable parable of the future.

Enter the world of a terrifying high-tech future gone awry, a world where computer chips are implanted directly into the brain of a child, where artists hide underground like hunted prey, and where a new force has invaded Earth's Computer Matrix--a force that's playing for keeps . . . Count Zero Interrupt. Count Zero is the sequel to the award-winning novel, Neuromancer.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer, was greeted with hosannas and showered with awards. This second book, set in the same universe, again offers a faddish, glitzy surface not unlike that of Miami Vice. Gibson's central image is the shadow boxes constructed by the artist Joseph Cornell, collections of seemingly unrelated objects whose juxtaposition creates a new impression. In the same fashion, the novel has three protagonists, each of whom is putting together jigsaw clues in pursuit of his separate goal. The corporate headhunter, the art dealer and the computer hacker all find themselves being manipulatedjust as the author contrives to have their paths converge. This book is less appealing and less verbally skillful than Gibson's first novel, dense and dour as that was, but readers who liked that one will want to see this as well. (March 26)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780441117734
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/28/1987
  • Series: Sprawl Trilogy Series , #2
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 167,497
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Williams Gibson was the first author to win the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick award also known as the “triple crown” of Science Fiction, on his debut novel Neuromancer. He lives in Canada and continues to write award winning critically acclaimed science fiction.

Biography

Science fiction owes an enormous debt to William Gibson, the cyberpunk pioneer who revolutionized the genre with his startling stories of tough, alienated loners adrift in a world of sinister high technology.

Gibson was born in Conway, South Carolina, and spent much of his youth in Virginia with his widowed mother. He grew up shy and bookish, discovering science fiction and the literature of the beats at a precociously early age. When he was 15, he was sent away to private school in Arizona, but he left without graduating when his mother died suddenly. He fled to Canada to avoid the draft and immersed himself in '60s counterculture. He married, moved to British Columbia, and enrolled in college, graduating in 1977 with a degree in English. Around this time he began to write in earnest, combining his lifelong love of science fiction and his newfound passion for the punk music evolving in New York and London.

In the early 1980s, Gibson met writer and punk musician John Shirley and sci-fi authors Lewis Shiner and Bruce Sterling. All three were blown away by the power and originality of Gibson's stories, and together the four men went on to forge a radical new literary movement called cyberpunk. In 1984, Gibson's groundbreaking first novel, Neuromancer, was published. Daring and revolutionary, it envisioned such techno-marvels as AI, virtual reality, genetic engineering, and multinational capitalism years before they became realities. Although it was not an immediate sensation, Neuromancer struck a chord with hardcore sci-fi fans who turned it into a word-of-mouth hit. Then it won the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards (the Triple Crown of Science Fiction), catapulting Gibson into superstardom overnight.

Even if he had never written another word, Gibson's impact would be clearly seen in the works of such cutting-edge contemporary authors as Neal Stephenson, Pat Cadigan, and Paul DiFilippo. But, as it is, Neuromancer was just the beginning -- the first book in an inspired trilogy that has come to be considered a benchmark in the history of the genre; and since then, Gibson has gone on to create even more visionary science fiction, including The Difference Engine, a steampunk classic co-authored with Bruce Sterling, and such imaginative post-9/11 cyber thrillers as Pattern Recognition and Spook Country .

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    1. Also Known As:
      William Ford Gibson (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 17, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Conway, South Carolina
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of British Columbia, 1977

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    Short answer review.

    Another word twisting Gibson story that is at times hard to follow. Told in a 3 part perspective, be ready to jump around from character to character. Good story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2004

    Worthy follow-up to Neuromancer

    I first read Count Zero 15+ years ago when it first came out, and at the time I thought it might have been the best sci-fi novel ever written. After recently catching up on Gibson's latest work, I decided to go back and re-read the Sprawl Trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive). Count Zero isn't quite as good as I remembered, but it is still a great novel, and the elapsed time has shown not only how much Gibson has influenced the genre, but pop culture and society in general. The Matrix movies, for example, were stolen from, er...influenced by the Sprawl novels, with their hipper-than-thou cyber-cool attitude mirroring the world evoked by Gibson's poetic prose. Three intertwining tales merge at the end of Count Zero to form a larger picture about the thin line between artificial intelligence and life itself. This is well-written science fiction, one of Gibson's best.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    true cyberpunk

    Technically the second book in a trology, but written in a way that it really takes place in the same universe. You don't have to have read Neuromancer to follow CZs story here. It's excellent, and gets down to the raw elements of 80s Cyberpunk, rampant technology, getting away from the creators and users even as they harness it for every purpose imagineable.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Fast & Charged

    Gibson keeps this one snapping along just like he did with Neuromancer, bouncing seamlessly between characters and scenes, weaving them together in the end. Behind everything, it's a heist story, and a good one at that.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Count Zero by William Gibson - the second volume of the Sprawl t

    Count Zero by William Gibson - the second volume of the Sprawl trilogy

    The quote is: "On receiving an interrupt, decrement the counter to zero."

    Thus the second installment of Gibson's Sprawl trilogy. After the two artificial intelligence beings,Neuromancer and Wintermute, were joined together in book one of the trilogy - Neuromancer, strange things begin to happen in the Matrix, leading to the proliferation of what appear to be voodoo gods such as Ougou Feray and Danbala.

    Josef Virek, an ultra-rich, reclusive being who wants his immortality and unlimited power, hires a small gallery owner in Paris, Marly Krushkova, to search a mysterious series of futuristic Joseph Cornell style boxes.

    In Arizona, a mercenary by the name of Turner is hired by Conroy - another mercenary - to aid a brilliant researcher and biohacker, Christopher Mitchell, switch companies. The staging goes awfully wrong because Conroy sabotages the mission, and Turner escapes with Mitchell's daughter, Angela (Angie) Mitchell Her commits suicide to allow the safe passage of his daughter, after altering her nervous system so that Angie can access the Cyberspace Matrix directly, without a "deck" (a computer with an interface directly into the user's brain).

    In Barrytown, New York a young amateur computer hacker, Bobby Newmark, self-named "Count Zero", is given a piece of black market software by some criminal associates "to test". When he plugs himself into the matrix and runs the program, it almost kills him. The only thing that saves his life is a sudden image of a girl made of light who interferes and unhooks him from the software just before he flatlines. This event leads to his working with his associates' backers to investigate similar strange recent occurrences on the Net.

    After meeting Virek, Marly becomes very suspicious of her boss' intentions and decides to betray him. She goes to "the Kingdom," a place where cowboy Wigan Ludgate - the Wig - has been creating the famous cube works that Vireck is after and with the help of Bobby and Angie they kill Virek.

    This is a very poorly written book. Narrated from the third person point of view, the author has trouble conveying who "she" or "he" are. All of the changes in the point of view are confusing, making it very hard to follow the story. The plot itself is confusing and very hard to follow - I recommend you read Wikipedia's information on the book before read it. Otherwise you will be so frustrated you'll probably not finish the work.

    Really disappointed by Gibson's work....

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2013

    Good read

    Surprisingly accurate and interesting view of the future

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2007

    Industrial Samurai

    This novel moves quickly at a kinetic pace,good charater developement with tight concise prose. A early winner from Gibson.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2002

    AWESOME!

    This is great, not only because it's the sequel to Neuromancer, but IT'S STILL REALLY REALLY GOOD! I know, I know, I'm rambling. Gibson is a great novelist, and SOME OTHER PEOPLE NEED TO WRITE REVIEWS!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 3, 2011

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    Posted November 18, 2010

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