Count Zero

Count Zero

4.2 62
by William Gibson
     
 

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Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme

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Overview

Turner, corporate mercenary, wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: Maas-Neotek's chief of R&D is defecting. Turner is the one assigned to get him out intact, along with the biochip he's perfected. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties—some of whom aren't remotely human.

Bobby Newmark is entirely human: a rustbelt data-hustler totally unprepared for what comes his way when the defection triggers war in cyberspace. With voodoo on the Net and a price on his head, Newmark thinks he's only trying to get out alive. Until he meets the angel.

A stylish, streetsmart, frighteningly probable parable of the future.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Potent and heady.” —Philadelphia Daily News

“An intriguing cast of characters and a tough, glitzy image of computer consciousness and the future of mankind.” —Richmond Times-Dispatch

Count Zero shares with Neuromancer that novel’s stunning use of language, breakneck pacing, technological innovation, and gritty brand-name realism.” —Fantasy Review

“William Gibson’s prose, astonishing in its clarity and skill, becomes high-tech electric poetry.” —Bruce Sterling

“Suspense, action…a lively story…a sophisticated version of the sentient computer, a long way from the old models that were simply out to Rule the World.” —Locus

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer, was greeted with hosannas and showered with awards. This second book, set in the same universe, again offers a faddish, glitzy surface not unlike that of Miami Vice. Gibson's central image is the shadow boxes constructed by the artist Joseph Cornell, collections of seemingly unrelated objects whose juxtaposition creates a new impression. In the same fashion, the novel has three protagonists, each of whom is putting together jigsaw clues in pursuit of his separate goal. The corporate headhunter, the art dealer and the computer hacker all find themselves being manipulatedjust as the author contrives to have their paths converge. This book is less appealing and less verbally skillful than Gibson's first novel, dense and dour as that was, but readers who liked that one will want to see this as well. (March 26)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780441117734
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1987
Series:
Sprawl Trilogy Series, #2
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
129,917
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Williams Gibson was the first author to win the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick award also known as the “triple crown” of Science Fiction, on his debut novel Neuromancer. He lives in Canada and continues to write award winning critically acclaimed science fiction.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Date of Birth:
March 17, 1948
Place of Birth:
Conway, South Carolina
Education:
B.A., University of British Columbia, 1977

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Count Zero 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 62 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another word twisting Gibson story that is at times hard to follow. Told in a 3 part perspective, be ready to jump around from character to character. Good story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A decent but short read. Unfortunately the spread between the three characters would be fine except that the opening chapters cycle quickly, without much happening in each. Very little action familiar to readers of Neuromancer appears until the final few chapters. I enjoyed the angle on Marly, the art collector. I would have appreciated it if there was more explanation in the final pages.
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