Country Living New Country Kitchens

Country Living New Country Kitchens

by Country Living, Country Living Editors, Rebecca Sayer-Faye
     
 

Through 250 photographs, take an in-depth look at the finest kitchens Country Living has ever profiled, and explore the elements, from cabinets to appliances, that form their foundation. These beautifully designed rooms come from American farmhouses, suburban homes, and even city apartments. See how to sort through the many available options, while considering your…  See more details below

Overview

Through 250 photographs, take an in-depth look at the finest kitchens Country Living has ever profiled, and explore the elements, from cabinets to appliances, that form their foundation. These beautifully designed rooms come from American farmhouses, suburban homes, and even city apartments. See how to sort through the many available options, while considering your own needs and budget.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688125868
Publisher:
Hearst
Publication date:
10/01/1995
Series:
Country Living Series
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
9.36(w) x 10.82(h) x 0.80(d)

Read an Excerpt

WoodenwareAmongthe earliest types of kitchenware used in he colonies, wares made of treen (an old English dialect term for "wooden") served the American cook in the days before the Revolution, when most pottery had to be imported.The forests of the New World provided plenty of wood; carvers used hardwoods such as maple and birch for trenchers and mixing bowls,and softer pine for spoons and boxes.Scoops and bowls were also shaped out of burls - rounded growths on the trunks and branches of otherwise healthy trees.The beautiful grains of elm, ash, and maple burls were especially prized.

Favorite woodenware collectibles include the rectangular boxes that once held candles, pipes, and personal documents, as well as oval and round pantry boxes, covered buckets (sometimes called firkins), rolling pins ,maple-sugar molds, and springerle boards, the decoratively carved mold used for making German cookies flavored with anise.

Because cleaning can be harmful, antique woodenware should not be used for serving food.With their simple designs and beautiful patinas, however, wooden collectibles stand on their own as display pieces, offering warmth and a sense of history.

Copyright©1995 by the Hearst Corporation

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >